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A Lesson in War

Not one to romanticize war I simply write my impressions and conclusions, like this poem: A Lesson of War

No one wins in war.
Aside from the stories, legend and lore
The only gain
From war
Is an unremovable stain:
Death.
After war, some who fought
May boast that they served in battle.
I don’t think I ever will.
The lesson I learned in war is
That it is not who you fight
But who you kill.

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My story about jumping into foxholes

The date was Feb 67. I was on my way back after a 30 day free leave for extending 6 months. Flew in to DaNang with a E-7 sitting next to me asking a billion questions. Now at that time transit was in hardbacks near the airfield, no Hilton yet. It is night and I am BSing with a team from 26 Marines. They there for rabies shots. All the sudden we hear a “freight trains” going over our heads. Then loud explosions on other side of airfield. Well this same E-7 runs in yelling about getting into the trenches. So being good Marines we get up go out and proceed to watch the FNG’s jump into a trench 1/2 full of water and mudd. We did not say a thing, just walked back to the hootch a went to sleep. Funny, never saw that Gunny agian. Semper Fi

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Lori ivy

While in artillary stationed in ICorps I got very sick. I was med evaced to a hospital in Danang. While I was hospitalized I got a dear JOHN letter from my girl at home. There was a list at the hospital of girls who would write to service personnel in Vietnam. I began writing to Lori Ivy. When I was released from the hospital I was still weak from my illness. I was sent home. I lost Lori’s address. I never could thank her. I couldn’t tell her what her letters meant to this young Marine sick on the other side of the world. I couldn’t even tell her I was sent home. To this day I think of her and hope somehow she will know how important she was to someone she never met. Semper-Fi Lori Ivy. 🇺🇸

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No Rose Garden Coming Home during Vietnam War

In your newsletter one person in a a comment went to Thailand after the War- my best friend is there too- wound up in Pattaya Beach- ( hope it is spelled correct) – fed up with bullshit here in the states- and a big ex-pat community there- also- one group is in the Philipines too- sorry to say that I can feel for those who found it tough to exist here. I stayed like many others and faced and still face some assholes who still are arm chair quarterbacks as to expounding information – and naturally all wrong it seems. The world is not what it used to be- and now with ISIS and the nut job in North Korea- a President who is a new experience for us- who wants radical changes ( good and bad ) for us. I have no answers– but I would enlist again in a heartbeat if I was younger and faced with the same decision parameters as I was against in 1963- I am proud of Old Glory and the U S of A – and still get riled about the wanna-bees who abuse our Country for silly rhetoric- and thank you Sgt Grit for a place to rave and rant about a chance to voice our opinions- we do not always agree- but enjoy the present- look forward to the future- and remember the past.

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Okinawa Invasion Battle Flag

While doing some research on a now deceased 6th Division Marine, I came across a fascinating memento from the Okinawa Invasion which this Marine, Robert G. Sproul, Wilmington, DE, had participated in. Among his souvenirs was a Japanese battle flag taken from a dead Japanese soldier during the battle. These battle flags, popular with many Japanes soldiers, were signed by family and friends with exhortations of good luck. The silk or cotton flags adorned with Japanese writings around the large red sun were worn around the soldier’s abdomen before going into battle. This particular flag has faded blood stains and what appear to be bullet holes. A poignant personal reminder of the Marine’s war in the Pacific during WWII.

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Then Tell Me What You Have To Say

Then Tell Me What You Have To Say

Somehow I got the feeling
That when I returned to the World
I should be ashamed.
I didn’t know why
But finally realized that I was being
blamed for the death and dying in
Viet Nam.
In war there is death.
How anyone who has not been in war
Knows what war is really doesn’t know.
If you think you know, you ought to go
And confirm that knowledge and insight.
Engage in a firefight.
Have someone shoot at you,
Be next to a man who is blown away.
Then, come back and tell me what you’ve learned.
Then tell me what you have to say.

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“Who Replaced You?”

I’ve been writing poems ever since I returned from VN. Why? Beats me. They just show up in my head and I write. Some were written after I had a drink or two and I am sure I will never with the Nobel prize for literature and I almost never share them, I still write though rarely drink now. I thought I’d drop one off here. I suppose my poems are a way for me to express many things I’ve thought and felt about being in the U.S. Marine Corps and having spent ~13 months in VN; also, some poems described my experiences when I returned. Semper Fi! Who Replaced You?

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PFC Dan Bullock

PFC Dan Bullock was born in Goldsboro ,NC His mother died when he was eleven years old and,he was sent to Brooklyn NY to live with his father.He always wanted to be a pilot,policeman or a Marine.He did not like New York so,when he was 14 he altered the birthdate on his birth certificate and enlisted in the Marine Corps.On Sept 18 1968 at 14 he was on his way to Parris Island He was a member of Plt.3039;Some of you reading this may have trained with him.On May 18 1969, at the age of 15, he arrived in Vietnam.He was assigned to Fox 2/5 and,on June 7 1969 he was KIA at or near An-Hoa. At 15 he became the youngest Serviceman killed in Vietnam .If anyone out there knew him please post a comment. SEMPER FI and RIP PFC BULLOCK. Harry

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No Welcome Home!

When sent to Vietnam I lacked two months being 18. When leaving I was a man at the age of 20. Having the experience of Combat, Trusting another with your daily life, & having the ” power ” of life & death in Your Trigger Finger; with all that hostility & meanness inside of you; nothing can ” top ” that “. Being given 3 choices of Duty Stations when leaving Nam—one of which was returning Stateside, I had better since . Choosing to go to Pearl Harbor as an M.P. for nine months was a fabulous decision because there I was locked up for 6 out of the 9 months. By the time returning home, all that ” stuff ” was able to be tolerated as well as those things still within. Being able to, I’d join the CORPS again in a heartbeat. Three things in life have really helped me to grow up & be a man: The MARINES, Married Life, & Prison Life, though I do not recommend the last 2 to anyone. SEMPER FIDELIS BROTHERS ” Stew ”

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Marines, Taking Care of Their own

Alzheimer’s is a terrible thing. My father-in-law lost the battle with Alzheimer’s and we cared for him for almost two years. It can be devastating. You might have seen in the news where a guy checked his wife out of a memory care facility for the day. He took her around back and shot her, killing her instantly. Married for forty years, she no longer recognized him. That guy was Master Sergeant Stephen Kruspe. He was the Operations Chief when I was the Commanding Officer of 4th ANGLICO. Top Kruspe was a very professional Marine – the kind of Marine you would want in your foxhole in a firefight. He has an attorney who will try to get the charge reduced from first degree murder. And though the attorney does not expect to get paid, the expert witnesses he will need to call to testify on Top Kruspe’s behalf will. If you want to help, send a check payable to “Attorney Jonathan Kaplan” and mail it to me at 5460 Old Mystic Court, Jupiter FL 33458-3470. When I get a pile of checks, I’ll send them together to the attorney. Marines always say “Marines take care of their own.” Let’s take care of Top Kruspe. Col Paul Loschiavo USMCR (Ret), former SALT Officer, 2nd ANGLICO, and former Commanding Officer, 4th ANGLICO.

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