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The Beer Run

This incident took place after an all-nighter around the spring of “68” We had set in around a small bridge north east of the village of Dia Loc and hill 37 about 20 miles southwest of Da Nang. We stayed there for a couple of hours then started trekking through the rice paddles heading south. Around daybreak we headed back toward the road we started from a little east of the bridge so we could meet up with some trucks to take us back to the hill. Continue reading “The Beer Run”

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Former Korea Marine Finally Gets Dress Blues

This was in one of the local papers today. I have known Mr. Lancing for years. Steadfast servant to the community, and just an all around nice guy who will take care of you the best that he knows how. And the new breed of Marines stepped up and took care of him. Continue reading “Former Korea Marine Finally Gets Dress Blues”

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USMC 1955 Uniforms

I thought you might enjoy seeing the USMC uniforms we wore in 1955 including summer “khakis”; winter “greens”; “dress blues”; and our olive drab combat uniform (that’s an M1 Garand over my right shoulder and a BAR in my left hand). The young lady in a couple of the pictures is my bride of 60 years. Semper Fi.

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Boot Camp

Two boot camp stories : (1) Around the first or second week of boot camp I learned not to let the D.I.finish chow before any recruit. There were about half dozen of us that that were late to formation after chow. the plt.was ready to march back to the barracks when the DI shouted “well well well there are our lost sheep ! Sheep fall in behind the platoon on all four just like sheep and make that sound that sheep make BAAA..BAAAAA.We marched back on hands and knees saying BAAA BAAA just like sheep all the way to the barracks and down the middle of the squad bay until the DI got his fill.Lesson learned!! (2) To many dirty rifles so the DI had us bury our rifles in the sand behind the barracks ,run a few laps and then go find your rifle and clean clean clean.If the DI found one grain of sand we would have to do it all over Parris Island PLT.3056 Oct -Dec 1967

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My Marine Corps experience

The Marine Corps was the greatest decision of my life. I signed up in my Senior year of High School in 1980 and was put on the Delayed Entry Program and left for Parris island in October of that year. I had a little bit of culture shock, but I was determined to make something of myself. After Basic, I shipped out to 29 Palms for Comm. School and graduated in June of 1981. I was sent to MCAS El Toro to my permanent duty station. Was with the Third Marine Airwing, MACG-38, MWCS-38. I enjoyed my years in the Corps and would do it again.

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My first time at sea!

I sailed to Hawaii from San Francisco, in 1959, aboard the “Mitchell,'” which, I was told, had been a “Liberty Ship” during War Two. To say the ship was overloaded is a gross understatement. There were several thousand troops, all services, jammed aboard. As we departed Treasure Island, approaching the Golden Gate Bridge, there were a lot of troops alongside, port and starboard, and I guessed the views from those points must be spectacular. As i headed toward starboard, a Chief told me, “Don’t go over there, Marine, all those people alongside are puking!” OMG, the sea was calm, the weather clear, and those people, Army and Air Force I was told, were already sick! We were packed so tightly that sack time was in shifts. Hammocks were stacked six high, and despite my head being directly under very hot pipes, I took the same Chief’s advice and selected a top berth. I would generally get some sleep after those under me stopped puking. Lines for chow, any meal, were endless. Generally, one entered the chow line an hour or two prior to the meal; once served the meal, all eating was don standing—there were no seats, we were encouraged to eat quickly and get out! Happily, I was stationed at Kaneohe for nearly two years. (And, my outfit, VMF-232, saw Nam LONG before anyone in the States knew Nam existed),

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NAS Memphis Millington Tennessee

One morning, instead of going to “A” school, I went to sickbay from the barracks instead of going to class first, then being sent to sick bay. In the tradition of shoot first, and ask questions later, I was written up UA. I was called to the first shirts office before doing the dance on the CO’s carpet. I explained to the first shirt the circumstances behind my being written up UA. Upon completion of my story, he asked me my name again. I replied “Pvt. Gibson” The first shirt said “oh, we’re looking for Pvt Carson, get the hell out of my office” This was about the only time it counted to have two last names.

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When Times are Trying, Just a Little Humor

Around the winter, spring of “68” the TET offensive was in full swing. I was a ammo tech H&S Co 3/7 around a little village called Dia Lac at the four corners. When most Marines called it a day they would leave their radios on after Armed Forces Radio went off the air. That way it would come back on in the morning without having to turn it back on and you know it was around 0600 hr. This particular morning around o545 hrs we started catching incoming and, of course, there was a scramble to get your stuff to a hole or bunker. Continue reading “When Times are Trying, Just a Little Humor”

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