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MARINE OF THE WEEK // SELFLESS SACRIFICE

Sgt. Rafael Peralta
1st Battalion, 3rd Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7, 1st Marine Division
Fallujah, Iraq, November 15 2004
Award: Navy Cross (Posthumously)
Clearing scores of houses in the previous three days, Sergeant Peralta asked to join an under-strength squad and volunteered to stand post the night of 14 November, allowing fellow Marines more time to rest. The following morning, during search and attack operations, while clearing the seventh house of the day, the point man opened a door to a back room and immediately came under intense, close-range automatic weapons fire from multiple insurgents. The squad returned fire, wounding one insurgent. While attempting to maneuver out of the line of fire, Sergeant Peralta was shot and fell mortally wounded. After the initial exchange of gunfire, the insurgents broke contact, throwing a fragmentation grenade as they fled the building. The grenade came to rest near Sergeant Peralta’s head. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Peralta reached out and pulled the grenade to his body, absorbing the brunt of the blast and shielding fellow Marines only feet away. Sergeant Peralta succumbed to his wounds. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Peralta reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.​​​​​​​

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Fitzgerald crew’s ‘heroic efforts’ saved their ship from sinking, admiral says

A top Navy admiral acknowledged Sunday that the destroyer Fitzgerald was in danger of sinking after a catastrophic collision off the coast of Japan Saturday and was saved by the “heroic efforts” of her crew that “had to fight very hard to keep the ship afloat.”

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OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW: MARINES TEST NEW GRENADE LAUNCHER MODULE

Marines with Bravo Company, 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion practiced handling and firing the M320 grenade launcher module at Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 6.

2nd CEB is one of the first Marine Corps units to be issued the M320, which has already been in use by the U.S. Army.

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Bob Hope At Freedom Hill

I was with 7th Comm. Battalion on hill 10, just outside Dogpatch, Christmas 1967. We all made plans to see Bob Hope at Freedom Hill. We were looking forward to all the “Eye Candy” he would bring to our part of the world. We made the trip along with about twenty thousand other swinging D-cks. We were so far up the side of that mountain all we could see was Mr. Hope’s red baseball cap.

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My story about jumping into foxholes

The date was Feb 67. I was on my way back after a 30 day free leave for extending 6 months. Flew in to DaNang with a E-7 sitting next to me asking a billion questions. Now at that time transit was in hardbacks near the airfield, no Hilton yet. It is night and I am BSing with a team from 26 Marines. They there for rabies shots. All the sudden we hear a “freight trains” going over our heads. Then loud explosions on other side of airfield. Well this same E-7 runs in yelling about getting into the trenches. So being good Marines we get up go out and proceed to watch the FNG’s jump into a trench 1/2 full of water and mudd. We did not say a thing, just walked back to the hootch a went to sleep. Funny, never saw that Gunny agian. Semper Fi

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Lori ivy

While in artillary stationed in ICorps I got very sick. I was med evaced to a hospital in Danang. While I was hospitalized I got a dear JOHN letter from my girl at home. There was a list at the hospital of girls who would write to service personnel in Vietnam. I began writing to Lori Ivy. When I was released from the hospital I was still weak from my illness. I was sent home. I lost Lori’s address. I never could thank her. I couldn’t tell her what her letters meant to this young Marine sick on the other side of the world. I couldn’t even tell her I was sent home. To this day I think of her and hope somehow she will know how important she was to someone she never met. Semper-Fi Lori Ivy. ??

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DITTO

Joined USMC one day after turning 17, spent my 18th birthday on hill 225 out side of Phu Bai (I 3/4). Did a Med Cruise with the 6th then a another tour, Khe Sanh with H 2/26. Quite an experience, never regretted it, always enjoyed hunting and camping. Oh yeah did college after my service. Semper Fi

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Bound and Determined

Bound and Determined

It was in the late summer or early fall of 1963, when at the age of 17, I got my parents to sign the consent form needed to enlist in the Marine Corps. With the consent form and pocket full of promises from the local recruiter I went down to Whitehall Street in lower Manhattan, NY to join up.
During my physical exam the Army doctor, who looked like he was about 80 years old, mixed up my paper work with the poor guy standing next to me. This guy had rheumatic fever as a child and should have been classified 4-F.Unfortunately he got my 1-A classification and I got the 4-F classification.
I was not a happy camper! To let everyone know they made a big mistake I shouted, cursed and threatened everyone around me until I was given the “bum’s rush” and escorted out the door.
Not willing to give up my quest to join the Marine Corps, I waited about two months and went to a different recruiter and started the process all over again. Remember this was the pre-computer days and you could get away with it.
On the day of my physical exam I had a different doctor. I passed the exam without a problem. As I was mentally congratulating myself I felt a tap on my shoulder. I turned around and was stating at a chest full of ribbons. I’m 6”1” but I had to look up about six inches to see a face that belonged to a very large MP. Behind him was an even larger MP. I was informed that I was about to be arrested for fraudulent enlistment. Of course I denied I was ever there before and tried to convince them they were mistaking me for someone else. One of the MP’s laughed and said that I made such a big stink he actually put a photo of me on his wall in the MP office.
After some desperate negotiations on my part the OIC at Whitehall Street told me to come back at 7:30 AM the next morning with an overnight bag. He told me I was going to be shipped over to Governor’s Island for a series of exams to see if I would pass a more stringent physical exam.
The next morning I boarded a ferry boat to Governor’s Island. There were twelve passengers going for physicals. Eleven of them were trying to get out of the Army and I was trying to get into the Marine Corps. I never regretted getting on that ferry boat.
Fast forward from that point on….I went to Parris Island in the first week of January 1964….made PFC out of Boot Camp…..and was attached to the one of the first combat units into Vietnam- 1st Battalion 3rd Marines in 1965.

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