Sgt. Grit Community
Submit Your Story

Then Tell Me What You Have To Say

Then Tell Me What You Have To Say

Somehow I got the feeling
That when I returned to the World
I should be ashamed.
I didn’t know why
But finally realized that I was being
blamed for the death and dying in
Viet Nam.
In war there is death.
How anyone who has not been in war
Knows what war is really doesn’t know.
If you think you know, you ought to go
And confirm that knowledge and insight.
Engage in a firefight.
Have someone shoot at you,
Be next to a man who is blown away.
Then, come back and tell me what you’ve learned.
Then tell me what you have to say.

read more

Return from carrier quals

In the early sixties the aircraft carriers at Pearl Harbor docked at the old Battle Ship Row in front of the Arizona Memorial on Ford Island. I was a plane captain on A4Ds in VMA-212 based at Kaneohe Bay on the other side of Oahu from”61” to “63”.  On return from one of these qualification cruises and after 20 or 30 hours of constant flight quarters, without a break, we plane captains were tired and dirty and taking a break on the hangar deck in the number two elevator opening. The elevator being up gave a huge picture window to the passing scene as we passed down the “slot” around Ford Island.  Somebody broke out a deck of cards and several of us were playing eucre on an overturned box.  The ships’ crew had been ordered into dress whites and lined the flight deck, shoulder to shoulder.  As we passed outgoing ships the Captain would announce “Attention to Port”, or “Attention to Starboard” and all the swabbies rendered hand salutes to the outgoing ships, which did the same in response with their crews.  Needless to say, a bunch of dirty, tired Marines looking at these passing swabbies all spit shined and rested did not appreciate the tradition we were observing.  We had our own version of the hand salute that got passed to the outgoing vessels.  This made for very astonished expressions from one sub as I recall.  Sailors in a row, from fore to aft and up the conning tower, mouths agape at the dirty, green humanoids disrespecting their ship.  Anyway, as we rounded Ford Island preparing to dock, the captain announced, “Attention to Starboard” and there coming into view was the new (at the time) Arizona Memorial, flying the stars and stripes as a still commissioned ship of the Navy.  Every man jack one of us stood at attention and saluted that beautiful flag and as we passed slowly by and into the slip just in front of the memorial.  No way could we not honor those brave men. Still brings a tear to my eye remembering. Cpl. Norm Spilleth 1960 to 1964 Sgt Grit wants to hear from you! Leave your comments below or Submit your own Story !

Inspiration Before The Battle (GySgt Walgren)

Take yourself back almost three years to February of 2010.  What were you doing then?  Were you in school, or at your last job?  For the Marines of 1/3, 1/6, 3/6, and 3/10, they were about to begin what was dubbed as the most dangerous combat operation since Fallujah with the commencement of Operation Moshtarak.  Their mission: clear the Taliban-infested city of Marjah, in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  While I have never set foot in Marjah, I did deploy just next door in Nawa district, having gone on many a patrol just outside of Marjah in the “friendly” area of Trek Nawa.  Before you watch this legendary speech by Gunnery Sergeant Walgren of 1/6 (1st Battalion, 6th Marines), try and imagine yourself as one of these young Marines that’s about to climb into a CH-53 helicopter and begin the assault.  Can you imagine the mental preparation you have to do to really prepare yourself for a mission like that, especially with all of the intel/news reports on how heavy the enemy activity was?  That’s where good leadership comes into play, and the video speech you’re about to witness is spine-tingling good.  You don’t have to be a good public speaker to be a good leader, but it is a good quality to have, and Gunny Walgren possesses it in spades.

read more

Godspeed, John Glenn

Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller presents the flag to Annie Glenn, wife of retired U.S. Marine Corps Col. John H. Glenn Jr., during his funeral at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va., April 6, 2017. Glenn passed away Dec. 8, 2016. Glenn was a U.S. Marine Aviator who flew 149 combat missions during World War II and the Korean War. He later became a NASA astronaut and was the first man to orbit the earth aboard the “Friendship 7” in 1962. He was then elected to the U.S. Senate for the state of Ohio in 1974 and served four consecutive terms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by CWO4 Jonathan C. Knauth)

read more

“Who Replaced You?”

I’ve been writing poems ever since I returned from VN. Why? Beats me. They just show up in my head and I write. Some were written after I had a drink or two and I am sure I will never with the Nobel prize for literature and I almost never share them, I still write though rarely drink now. I thought I’d drop one off here. I suppose my poems are a way for me to express many things I’ve thought and felt about being in the U.S. Marine Corps and having spent ~13 months in VN; also, some poems described my experiences when I returned. Semper Fi! Who Replaced You?

read more

PFC Dan Bullock

PFC Dan Bullock was born in Goldsboro ,NC His mother died when he was eleven years old and,he was sent to Brooklyn NY to live with his father.He always wanted to be a pilot,policeman or a Marine.He did not like New York so,when he was 14 he altered the birthdate on his birth certificate and enlisted in the Marine Corps.On Sept 18 1968 at 14 he was on his way to Parris Island He was a member of Plt.3039;Some of you reading this may have trained with him.On May 18 1969, at the age of 15, he arrived in Vietnam.He was assigned to Fox 2/5 and,on June 7 1969 he was KIA at or near An-Hoa. At 15 he became the youngest Serviceman killed in Vietnam .If anyone out there knew him please post a comment. SEMPER FI and RIP PFC BULLOCK. Harry

read more

No Welcome Home!

When sent to Vietnam I lacked two months being 18. When leaving I was a man at the age of 20. Having the experience of Combat, Trusting another with your daily life, & having the ” power ” of life & death in Your Trigger Finger; with all that hostility & meanness inside of you; nothing can ” top ” that “. Being given 3 choices of Duty Stations when leaving Nam—one of which was returning Stateside, I had better since . Choosing to go to Pearl Harbor as an M.P. for nine months was a fabulous decision because there I was locked up for 6 out of the 9 months. By the time returning home, all that ” stuff ” was able to be tolerated as well as those things still within. Being able to, I’d join the CORPS again in a heartbeat. Three things in life have really helped me to grow up & be a man: The MARINES, Married Life, & Prison Life, though I do not recommend the last 2 to anyone. SEMPER FIDELIS BROTHERS ” Stew ”

read more

A WWII VETERAN’S JOURNEY | THROUGH HELL AND BACK TO TELL ABOUT IT

At 4:30 p.m., April 6, 1945, the United States Ship John C. Colhoun II received a call for help from a ship under kamikaze attack. When the Colhoun sailed toward the vessel in distress, the kamikazes turned on the Colhoun, crashing into the bridge of the ship and sinking it. Navy veteran Donald Irwin survived, but lost 34 shipmates that day, off the coast of Okinawa.

read more

Clash of Characters: Gunny Hartman takes title, R. Lee Ermey thanks his fans

After one last dominating performance, a single military movie character stands head and shoulders above the rest.

Head and shoulders and campaign cover, that is.

Gunnery Sgt. Hartman took out Capt. John Miller (“Saving Private Ryan”) in the final round of Battle Bracket: Clash of Characters voting to claim the title of best fictional military movie or television character ever. R. Lee Ermey’s “Full Metal Jacket” DI wasn’t seriously challenged in any of his six contests.

read more

Foxhole jumping

I posted a story a while back Sgt Grit liked so much he post it twice. lol When I saw Robert Mcload story jumping into foxhole it brought back memories that story I told about. It was on Hill 37 out side the village Dia Loc at The 4 corners. The story goes , we were getting incoming about 0545 , mortars were hitting all around us I was in the S4 hooch I grab my m16, helmet, flak jacket.The foxhole I’am referring to was just outside the back door of S4. I was doing about 60 miles an hour when I jumped feet first into the hole. Just as I went in a face appeared and both #10 ‘s met this face. Without hesitation I bounced out of their within a second. The reason I moved so quickly is their were captain bars on his helmet. Now, you say I could have stayed an apologize, I’am just a cpl. so at the time I just made myself scarce and went to the bunker underneath S4. That’s were the other story comes in about Gooood Morning Vietnam. Well the captain I met in the foxhole was Captain Robb of Lima co. 3/7, the President’s son-in-law. This is the first and last time I’ll mention this story and I’am sticking to it. My most sincere apology to the Captain. From what I saw and heard about the Captain, he was a damn fine Marine. Semper Fi my friends. Sid Crews ammo tech. 3/7, in country, Nov 66 to July 68 Oooorah!!!

read more