Sgt Grit Marine Corps Merchandise

Welcome to our Marine Corps Newsletter archives. Here you can find USMC articles and memories sent in to us by fellow Jarheads and their families. Enjoy!

Sgt Grit Marine Corps Newsletter - March 2, 2001

SIR ! The count on deck is... 72... little green amphibious monsters who thrive on discipline, blood, and guts SIR !!! Sgt. Dave Stutesman 1979-83 P.I. plt. 2083


Pass this newsletter on to anyone you feel would like it.
To submit your thoughts use contact@grunt.com

To SUBSCRIBE to the list click here:

http://www.grunt.com/scuttlebutt/freenewsletter.asp
Insert your email address in the SUBSCRIBE box

To UNSUBSCRIBE from the list click here:
http://www.grunt.com/scuttlebutt/freenewsletter.asp
Scroll down and insert your email address in the UNSUBSCRIBE box

...OR... email me at contact@grunt.com

LISTEN UP....
some of you do not get a newsletter weekly.
Do this; put this email address in your address book.
sgt_grit_news@grunt.com
Some filters look for an approved address.

APPLAUSE WAS FOR THEM

Hi Sarge,
I had the privilege of hearing the USMC band from San Diego last night at Sherwood High School in Cass County Missouri. They flew to Whiteman AFB via a C-130 and my sis picked them up in a school bus adorned with US Navy stickers (her hubby was in the Navy and her son is a recruiter now, she is not proud at all by the way). She says the Navy has been hauling Marines around for a long time now. haha. The band played with the Sho-Me West All Conference Band, 4 schools and it was truly great. The turn out was large. When the band played the USMC hymn, I was taping it for my ill former Marine at home to see. My sis tapped me on the shoulder and pointed behind us. I panned around and there were about 6 elderly men standing up at attention as best they could. Former Marines! The applause was for them that time. There lots of tears flowing. Anyway, the band was great and no one was in a hurry to leave. Lots of people wanted to shake a Marine's hand. Even young people. It is always impressive to see those dress blues. Just wanted to share this with you. Keep up the good work. Enjoy your newsletter greatly. Maggie in Mo

HIS PERSONAL AUTOGRAPH

The wife and I attended the 56th Annual Memorial Service held on Feb. 17 at The Golden Gate National Cemetery south of San Francisco. Many Marine Corp organizations from the Bay Area were represented. The 23rd Marines stationed in San Bruno, CA advanced the colors, served as Honor Guard and Field Music played Taps, all in full dress blues. Impressive! The CO of the 23rd, COL John L. Ledux was the Keynote speaker, a Navy Chaplain gave the invocation and the Admiral who was responsible for prior invasion UDT activities was on the dais. Seated in the audience was Joe Rosenthal, a San Francisco resident. To your younger readers, Joe was the photographer made famous by his photo of the flag raising on Mt. Suribachi. At the end of the program, I had the honor of addressing him and lamented " If you would have been in Korea, it wouldn't have been named The Forgotten War". He retorted after careful thought, " Glad I wasn't". with a twinkle in his eye. Not bad for a gentleman closing in on 90 years of age! He made every effort to converse with all in attendance, especially the heroes of the battle for Iwo. After relocating to the 23rd Regimental CP, an active duty Marine offered a sheet of Iwo Jima commemorative stamps to Joe to autograph. Mr. Rosenthal kneeled on the concrete floor, placed the stamps on the seat of a folding chair and gave him his personal autograph. It was a day neither I or my brothers will soon forget, especially that very lucky Marine. Semper Fi Bob Vicari S/Sgt Korea '51/ USMC '50-'53

I OFTEN TALK TO ANYONE

Sgt Grit, I am a Former Marine, I Co. 3rd Bn. 5th Marines. I am in the middle of reading a book by James Bradley titled, "Flags of our Fathers". The author's father was one of the flag raisers on Mt. Suribachi. So far it has given me a new sense of pride reading about the heroics, courage, dedication and esprit de corps. I often talk to anyone who will listen (mostly my wife) about my experience in the Corps and the love that I shared with my Band of Brothers. My wife tells me that my face lights up whenever I speak of my Corps and tell her of all my experiences and although some of training was physically challenging we also had great fun. I can remember times when I thought my gut was going to burst from laughter. In the book "Flags of our Fathers" the camaraderie that were was shared Marines in the 1940's (although I never saw combat) seemed similar to the brotherhood I shared with the Marines in my time. Pride, tradition, honor, I will always carry in my heart, the Corps, Semper Fidelis Gil Morales Book #BK398 $24.95 http://www.grunt.com/books4.asp

HE WOULD NEVER TELL ME

SGT GRIT, AS A YOUNG BOY I USED TO LOOK HIGHLY TO MY GRANDFATHER, BECAUSE I THOUGHT HIM BEING A MARINE WAS THE COOLEST THING EVER. I USED TO ASK HIM QUESTIONS ABOUT THE CORPS AND HE WOULD NEVER TELL ME ABOUT IT BECAUSE HE SAID I WOULDN'T UNDERSTAND, HE SAID MAYBE IF YOU EVER EARN THE TITLE WE CAN SIT DOWN AND TALK. WELL THE DAY I TURNED 17 I ENLISTED INTO THE MARINE CORPS AND GOT A SHIP DAY TO MCRD SD 2 DAYS AFTER I GRADUATED FROM HIGH SCHOOL. MY GRANDFATHER SAID WELL I'LL SEE YOU AFTER IT'S ALL DONE(IF YOU MAKE IT HAHA.)WELL AFTER 6 WEEKS OF BOOT CAMP I RECEIVED A LETTER SAYING THAT MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY. SO WHEN I GRADUATED IT DIDN'T FEEL COMPLETE BECAUSE I NEVER GOT TO HAVE THE TALK. WELL TO MAKE ALONG STORY SHORT I HAVE NOW BEEN IN THE MARINE CORPS FOR 6 YEARS AND NOW SERVING AS A RECRUITER IN THE PARRIS ISLAND AREA, AND ALL THE MARINES RETIRED AND WHO SERVED BACK IN WWI, WWII,& KOREA COME IN MY OFFICE ALL THE TIME AND TELL ME STORIES ABOUT THE OLD CORPS AND IN AWAY IT KINDA FEELS LIKE THE TALK MY GRANDFATHER AND I SHOULD OF HAD, AND TO HAVE SO MUCH RESPECT FOR THESE MARINES AND NOW BE ABLE TO BOND IN AWAY IS ONE OF THE BEST THING TO FEEL. SEMPER FI MARINES! SGT SCHULTZ AND GOD BLESS MY GRANDFATHER RETIRED LTCOL M SCHULTZ USMC.

LEFT WITHOUT SAYING ANOTHER WORD

After class during the first or second week of last semester, a student approached me about getting registered in my course. I had to tell him that, because all my laboratory sections were full to capacity, I couldn't accommodate him. He got rather irate, and began loudly complaining about how he had been trying in vain to get into various classes (the normal registration period was long over), and how he had come to me because his advisor had told him he'd screwed up by waiting so long to register for classes. "I don't know what his f***in' problem is," he said, "he must be a g*dd*m ex- Marine or something." At that point, I just reached over with my left hand to scratch high up on my right arm. I was wearing a short- sleeved shirt at the time, and when I pushed up my right shirt sleeve to scratch, it revealed the letters U.S.M.C. tattooed there. I said, "Yeah, you gotta watch out for those g*dd*mned ex-Marines - they'll screw you every time." The student took one look at the tattoo, turned bright red, picked up his books, and left without saying another word. Oorah! Semper fi! Mike Benton (Sgt., 0351, 2/5, 1970-1976) Conway, AR

A FEW GOOD MEN

When the Marines adopted the slogan “We need a few good men” they must have had Ted Williams in mind. I was discharged from the United States Marine Corps on March 9, 1950 and was called back in for the Korean War in September of 1950. After serving 19 more months, I then was stationed at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania waiting for a second discharge when Gerry Coleman one of the New York Yankees was called to active duty and reported here. Then, on April 2, 1952 my day had come to be discharged and to my surprise the legendary Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox was reporting back to active duty. Now lets talk about Ted, I was kidding him about him being my replacement. Here is a man that served 4 years in World War II as a Marine Pilot and then was called back to service in the Korean War. He flew 25 combat missions and when asked about interrupting his baseball career he answered he is proud to be a Marine and even prouder to serve his country. In my opinion, he was a great and dedicated Marine. If Ted Williams did not miss over 5 prime years of his life in the service, think of what he would have done to add to all the records he now has. To show you what a class act he is, he took about 10 of us out for a drink to celebrate (I would like to think it was for me getting my discharge). But it was just because he is a class act. This is my tribute to a great ball player and a proud Marine. Philip A. Buccigrossi Former Sgt. USMC Brooklyn, New York

SILVER STAR, PLUS 33 YEARS

TOPEKA, Kansas (Feb. 3, 2001) -- A Topeka postal worker will receive the third-highest honor the military can bestow for putting his life on the line as a 19-year-old amphibious vehicle operator in Vietnam.
Jim Lockhart, 52, will receive the Silver Star at 7:30 a.m.today at the Marine Corps Reserve Center, 2014 S.E. Washington, for "gallantry" displayed during the Vietnam War when he rescued a fellow Marine whose name he still doesn't know. Lockhart, a Topekan since 1970 and supervisor of material control operations for the U.S. Postal Service, said he was shot four or five times below his right knee, once in the right hip and once just above the right knee when he inched out onto the ramp extending from an amphibious tractor to help a seriously wounded infantryman.
The citation detailing the events of March 2, 1968, and signed by Secretary of the Navy Richard Danzig goes on to say that "[d]espite his own wound and at great risk to his life, Private First Class Lockhart crawled forward to the wounded Marine and dragged him into the vehicle. While moving the wounded Marine into the amphibious tractor, Private First Class Lockhart was wounded again by shrapnel and ricocheting bullets.
"By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme dangers, unrelenting perseverance, and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Lockhart reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service."
"I guess my thoughts were just a concern of whether I could get the wounded back," Lockhart said last week. "And yes, I was terrified. Anyone who says they weren't isn't telling you the truth. You really didn't think about medals at that time, you just thought about getting out."
Lockhart said he felt "humbled" about receiving the Silver Star. "I was just one they could document," he said, employing the self- effacing manner of the military. "It's good in a way, it brings the focus on the Vietnam veterans. People need to know they were heroes. I think this will give recognition to all of them in some minor way. That would be my goal."
At a Marine reunion four years ago in Albany, Ga., some of Lockhart's platoon buddies recalled the amphibious vehicle operator's heroism and felt he should be recognized. Tom Williams was among them. Williams joined Lockhart's platoon as a private first class, "scared as hell" and 18 years old. He missed meeting Lockhart by about a week. Williams had heard about Lockhart's bravery and, after the reunion, set to work rounding up Lockhart's platoon members, taking statements to assemble a narrative of the incident.
"It took me about four years to get hold of the other guys," Williams said during a telephone interview last week. He sent the information he had gathered to retired Brig. Gen. William Weise. Ten months passed before Lockhart's Silver Star was approved. Weise authored the citation that Lockhart will receive with the medal.
Weise, known as "Wild Bill" in those days, said Lockhart was "incredibly brave, it was a miracle that he made it." He said that Lockhart exposed himself to enemy fire by crawling out onto that ramp, "fire that would have killed him, but he took that risk. "He put his own welfare last and risked his life to save his fellow Marine," said Weise, former commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion 4th Marines in Vietnam. "It's an unselfish, brave kind of man that makes the Marine Corps what it is. I think he to me exemplifies everything that's fine about being a Marine."
The Silver Star is awarded for "heroic action in combat," according to Capt. Jay Parker, inspector instructor for 2nd general support ammunition platoon, 4th supply battalion, U.S. Marine Corps. The medal is the third highest award for gallantry, behind the Medal of Honor and the Navy Cross. Submitted by: John Wear

OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES

My 10 year old daughter was given an assignment in her religious study class. The task was to tell her parents why they are special. "Dear Mon and Dad, I think you guys are special! "Dad" I think you're special cause you were a Marine and I think you still are. "Mom" I think you're special because when I'm in trouble you help me."" I was in the Corps from '63 to '67. Spent '66 to '67 in Vietnam, Republic of. Served with 3rd SSCT. I didn't know it still showed. former Sergeant of Marines S/F

JOKE

My father pasted away several days ago and I do not know anyone who loved the CORPS including me more than my DAD. As I was sitting here going through the newsletter I began to think of a story my Father always told and I would like to share it with all of you, he would have liked that. As the story goes there was a Chinese general standing on a rock looking down a valley with 600 Chinese soldiers with him when a shot was fired at the general, the general at that time sent 20 Chinese soldiers in the valley to end the shooting, well there was fighting, shooting, crying I guess what we could say was ALL HELL BROKE LOSE. After about one hour 1 Chinese soldier came back to report to the general and said it was a nasty battle he needs more men. Well the general got pretty pissed off and sent 200 Chinese soldiers down the valley to end this bull shit. Well, after about 2 hours of fighting, crying and shooting 1 Chinese soldier came back and told the general they lost all there men. The general asked the soldier what they were up against and the soldier told the general that all he knew was there was one US MARINE down there YELLING SEMPER-FI and KILLING EVERBODY. Now the general a smart man that he was knew this was impossible so he sent 400 CHINESE SOLDERS down the valley but this time he sent a spotter to see what the hell was going on. Well about 4 hours later after all the shooting, screaming yelling and blood and guts fighting the spotter came back to tell the general that they had lost again. The general as pissed off as he has ever been looked at the spotter and said what the hell was down there, the spotter looked in the general's eyes and said, Sir, it was an ambush there was TWO US. MARINES................... SEMPER-FI RAY LETCHER

ARMY BIRTHDAY

Sgt. Grit, I enjoy reading the stories on your newsletter, so I thought I'd submit one. About 11 years after I got out of the Corps, I ended up back in California working for the Post Office at the Santa Ana General Mail Facility. Santa Ana's close proximity to MCAS El Toro, Tustin and Camp Pendleton ensured that there were quite a few fellow Marines working there. Every November, we would wear portions of our uniforms (some of the Supervisors who didn't get dirty when they worked, wore their Blues). We would all pitch in and get a large cake. The boss of our shift would allow us time to get together and eat our cake and take a few pictures. One year, one of the older Marines had an idea about how to celebrate our Birthday. He got everyone to bring him a picture of themselves when they served. He then placed all of the pictures on a large board which he displayed in the main employee entrance. One of my co-workers (ex-Army) and I were talking to the Marine when I turned in my picture. My co-worker said "why doesn't someone do this for the Army's birthday?' I said, "When is the Army's birthday?" Co-worker said, "I don't know." "Exactly!" Said the old Marine. As a postscript, the former Army employees copied our display a couple of years later. On Veterans Day, they still didn't know when their birthday was. Unsigned

KOREA VETS, HERE'S YOUR CHANCE

Dear Sir- First of all let me thank you for fighting for my freedom and stopping the spread of Communalism in South Korea 1950-1953.I teach History at McLaughlin Middle School in Lake Wales ,Florida. My class has just seen a 2 part movie on the Korean War. Maybe we could get some GI's from the Korean Campaign to E-Mail some of my students who have access to computers to answer there questions concerning the Korean War. If this sounds like a good educational idea let me know. E-Mail me at FlcnrArt@aol.com to keep me informed of your decision. Thanks for your time. Art Falconer

COLD WAR RECOGNITION CERTIFICATES

By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON -- Between 18 million and 22 million former and current service members and DoD civilians can start applying April 5 for certificates honoring them for their parts in winning the Cold War. Those qualifying for the certificates can apply via the Internet at http://coldwar.army.mil, e-mail at cwrs@Fairfax- emh1.army.mil, or fax at 703) 275-6749.
Applicants can also mail requests to: Cold War Recognition 4035 Ridge Top Road, Suite 400 Fairfax, VA 22030. Applicants must present proof of service. Army officials caution applicants not to send original documents because they cannot be returned. Applicants must use fax or mail to submit supporting documents. Persons are eligible for the recognition certificate if they have military or civilian service with the War, Navy or Defense departments between Sept. 2, 1945, and Dec. 26, 1991.

HONOR DETAILS

Sgt Grit:
For those who have had the privilege of participating on giving Military Honors for a deceased Veteran you understand how important it is to the family. For ALL MARINES, you have the ability to form your own volunteer Memorial Honor Detail at your nearby National Cemetery. At the Riverside National Cemetery (California) Semper Fi #1 Memorial Honor Detail consists of honorably discharged Marines, with some having served in WWII!! We are privileged to give FULL MILITARY HONORS to veterans of any branch when the family requests it. Also, when the deceased is a Marine, a poem is read and the Marines Hymn is played. We would be happy to speak (or email) information if any Marines would like to form their own "Semper Fi Memorial Honor Detail". Anyone interested could contact us, or contact your nearby National Cemetery. The VA provides the blanks and the Flags. We provide our own uniforms and pay our own travel expenses. Semper Fi #1 has been in existence for almost four years, having been formed under the leadership of M/Sgt Wesley Morrett (USMC Ret). I can't begin to express how proud I am to be a part of this unit. Denne Howard Sgt USMC 1953-1956 WB6TCA@aol.com

MARINE

Marines Olongapo, Philippines, circa 1968 Somewhere between the security of childhood and the insecurity of the second childhood, we find the Marine.
Marines are found everywhere; in bars, behind bars, in holes, in fights, in trouble, running on the double.
You will find them in battle, on streets, overseas, in love, on leave, but most often in debt. Marines come in assorted sizes, colors, weights, and stages of sobriety, anger, misery and confusion. They come in camouflage, olive green, khakis, black, muddy and sporting the native flora on their helmets. A Marine is; laziness with a deck of cards, misery with a grin on his face, exhausted and sleeping in the mud, a penniless millionaire. He is brave with or without a beer in his hand, courageous with a grain of common sense. He is the protector of America, with a Playboy magazine in his back pocket. A Marine is a composite; he is air-cooled, alcohol operated and foot-propelled. He is cocky and conceited, high strung and self-centered, over bearing and considers himself underpaid. He is shy like a fox, has the nerve of dope addict, the energy of a turtle, the brains of a rock, the stories of an old sailor and the sincerity of a liar. He has the appetite of a horse, the table manners of a chimpanzee, and the aspirations of Casanova.
When a Marine wants something, it's usually a three-day pass, a light of a cigarette, his own field jacket, poncho liner, or anything else he can misappropriate from supply, a ten dollar loan, or someone to stand his duty. He likes girls, women, females, ladies and members of the opposite sex, sex, sex, beer, liquor, liberty, leave and sixteen-thirty. He dislikes answering letters, wearing his uniform, standing inspections, Second Lieutenants, getting up for reveille, Marine Corps chow, close order drill, training, war, work, the day before payday and the curfew set by the parents of the girls he takes out. No woman can tame him and no man can beat him. He is unwilling, unreliable, irresponsible, impossible and indestructible.
A Marine is a magical creature. You can shut him out of your home but not out of your heart. You can take him off of your mailing list but not out of your mind. You may as well give in; he is yours. He is your brother, lover, friend, or son. He is a bright-eyed good for nothing bundle of worries, but after all, and always, a Marine. Semper Fidelis. Submitted by: Steve Krasowski

WHAT IS A MARINE

Between the security of childhood and the insecurity of second childhood, we find a fascinating group of humanity called “United States Marines”. They come in assorted sixes, shapes and uniforms. They can be found in harbor ports, ships, naval bases, and all of the God forsaken lands the government can find, plus in bars, in line and always in debut. Girls love them, towns tolerate them, and the government supports them. A “Marine” is born with a tattooed arm, deadly with a deck of cards, and the defender of our land with a copy of “Playboy”. A “Marine” has the shyness of a boy, and the energy of a turtle, the sea stories of a gale, the sincerity of a liar, and the over-exasperation ways of a “Casanova”. He likes woman, girls, females and the opposite sex. He dislikes answering questions, letters, superior officers and relatives. No one else can cram into one pocket a church key, a crushed pack of cigarettes, a comb, an autographed picture of his girl, and what else is left of his paycheck, like a “Marine “ can. A “Marine” spends his money on beer, whiskey, poker, women, Japanese skin movies and two airmail stamps. The rest he spends foolishly. He is a magic creature; you can scratch him off your list but you cannot scratch him off your mind. You might as well give up. He is your long-way-away-from- home bundle of worry and all your heartaches are soon forgotten when he comes home and says, “Hi, Mom I’m home”. Timothy L. McMahon Plt. 200 1964 HMM-262 65-67 HMM-261 67-68

PRAYER

A Prayer given by a Chaplain recently at the Marine Corps Birthday Ball:
"My friends, it was once said......'O Lord, we have long known that prayer should include confession'. Therefore on behalf of the Marines and their guests gathered here tonight, I confess their sins:
"Lord, they're just not in step with today's society. They are unreasonable in clinging to old-fashioned ideas like patriotism, duty, honor and country.
They hold radical ideas believing that they are their brother's keeper and responsible for the Marine on their flank. They have been seen standing when colors pass, singing the National Anthem at ball games, and drinking toasts to fallen comrades. Not only that, they have been observed standing tall; taking charge and wearing their hair unfashionably short. They have taken Teddy R's and JFK's words too seriously and are overly concerned with what they can do for their service and country instead of what it can do for them. They take the Pledge of Allegiance to heart and believe that their oath is to be honored. And,...they know well what the definition of 'is' is.
Forgive them, Lord, for being stubborn men and women who hold these values as genuine. They are aware of the price for honor and with total command of their spirit, they have been willing to pay that price. After all, what more can you expect? They're Marines!
O Lord our God, bless these men and women of ideals, continue to raise up in this nation strong leaders and deliver us from "me first" managers and "don't ask me" followers.
Be our honored guest this day, Oh Lord, and join with us in laughter, good food, good drink, and the telling of tall tales and legends that may occasionally exceed the truth. We bow our heads to those who were lost in places that had names meaningless until the mud-Marines landed, and in that mud reaffirmed the one legacy that brings all Marines together by the blood and tears shed for service of country and each other. Watch over and keep safe all those who wear this nation's uniform with special attention to their families and loved ones everywhere. With brandy and cigar in hand, I salute you all, for through this day and all the following nights and days ahead, God bless you, God Bless this great Nation, and God bless the United States Marine Corps."
Semper Fi & Amen Submitted by: John Wear

ASKED IF I JUST GO HOME

Dear Sgt Grit:
I just read LCpl Kent's letter. I thought I would share something with you that his letter brought to mind. I graduated from Parris Island in October 1985. 3rd Battalion H company. Platoon 3075. My father and step mother came to PI to see me graduate. This in itself was special as my step mom does not like to fly. Graduation day I saw my dad's eyes tear up and he told me he was proud of me. My dad. This is the guy I have looked up to for all of my life difficulties and questions. (still do) This is the guy who runs a major company with plants around the world. He was proud of me. I, to this day, have no idea how to tell him how that made me feel. Then I received word I would be going to the Persian Gulf. That day I saw my dad's eyes tear up again. Let me tell you, when I returned home two weeks before the birth of my first child, my son, and saw my dad; well his weren't the only wet eyes that day. Prior to leaving on our 96, gunny told us that when we returned we should have our uniforms cleaned up and look like Marines. Now, these are the same cammies we had been wearing over there. Cleaning these was going to be no small feat as most of them were covered in oil that Sodamn Insane had released from the wells. Well I was in an airport waiting for my flight and this woman and her little daughter, probably around 6 - 8 years old, leans over and asked if I just got home. I was back in country about 8 hours by that point. I said "yes ma'am". About 2 minutes later, this little girl comes over to me with this book in her hand. Her mother asked if I would mind signing it for her. She said this was her "special book". There were some rather famous people in it as I recall. add to it
John A. Hill
Corporal
USMCR
1st Battalion 25th Marines
Weapons Company
Dragon Platoon
Semper Fidelis

FAMILY TRADITION

Sgt. Grit, I enlisted in the Marines on March 10, 1965 and went to P.I. July 1, When I graduated from boot camp in Sept. I was very proud to be called, "Marine." I went to Viet Nam in 66 and was attached with MABS 36. in Chu Lai. Although I never saw much action there, when I returned to the States I served my remaining two years at the Camp Pendleton "Brig" and saw plenty of action there.
What I am more proud of than my stint in the Corps, is the fact that my wife's son, who is like my own, my twins and my youngest son, to my first wife, all joined the Marines. My twins are both Desert Storm Vets. They are all out now, but I have a another son in high school, and he has indicated that if he goes into the service, he will have to join the Marines because of family tradition.
That's why I say Marine Family and proud of it. Semper Fi Sgt. Donald Snowden

SHORT ROUNDS

"Few men have virtue to withstand the highest bidder." --George Washington To those who have fought for it, Freedom has a taste the Protected will never know. "'Inclusiveness,' one of today's values, is served by Presidents Day, which renders the Father of Our Country an equal ingredient with Warren Harding in a bland pudding of presidents." --George Will Intelligence was always putting on pressure. "We need contact." "We need prisoners." "We need more information." As the pressure increased this meant longer patrols, lengthier ambushes and finally raids of enemy positions. "The Korean War" Page 97 BK406 $15.95 http://www.grunt.com/books5.asp Jim Burke (eburke@unr.net) Subject: Military Quotations Just found this book in library. Multiple listings for ancient and modern military figures. ? awhile back about Lt. Gen. Puller's quote on beer in the barracks - "Give them beer and whiskey - that will help some- and get rid of the ice cream, candy and girls in the training camps." This is noted as a United Press quote in 1951 Captain Grave then said, "Major, that's just about the entire area that we daily work in. So now I'll show you how easily you can spot an NVA gooner from this OV-10A. We'll fly over to the Arizona free-kill zone." "Cleared Hot" Page 151 BK405 $6.95 http://www.grunt.com/books5.asp "I hope I shall always possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an 'Honest Man'." --George Washington "Adversity toughens manhood, and the characteristic of the good or the great man, is not that he has been exempted from the evils of life, but that he has surmounted them." --Patrick Henry "Uncle" Jarhead! Remember to buy something. $arah Whitton, College Freshman


God Bless America!!
Semper fi!!
Sgt Grit

Back to Archives Menu - Back to Scuttlebutt Menu - Subscribe to Newsletter