Sgt Grit Marine Corps Merchandise

Welcome to our Marine Corps Newsletter archives. Read our patriotic stories of American courage sent in to us by Marines and their families. Enjoy!

Sgt Grit American Courage Newsletter #22

A big kiss to every Marine from someone from Italy who loves Marines more than everything in the world!
Semper Fidelis!
Elena


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I can remember this as if it was yesterday. I had just reported to San Diego for radio school after boot camp also at San Diego.  Two other new Marines had also graduated from San Diego and we decided to strut our stuff (as humble as it may have been) near the boot camp area of MCRD. We were feeling pretty cocky and confident when I get a sick, scared feeling. I see one of my Drill Instructors.  What are the odds he would be on street coming my way. He gets closer, closer, I'm hoping he does not see this maggot a**ed puke, but of course he recognizes me. I am terrified. He is as nice, polite, and down to earth as you could ask. I am still terrified, but am able to contain it. Anyway the point of bringing this up is that he mentions we have joined the largest brotherhood on earth. We may not know it or understand it now, but in time we will. He was right.  At the time I did not understand, but I do now. Sooooo.....it does not seem right for me not to include the reunion notices you send me. Even if it takes up some room. I will print them at the bottom after my sign off. From some of the emails I get I know this has helped many find old buddies. Find your buddies, celebrate with your buddies, remember those who have gone before us with your buddies.  So here's to the brotherhood, Semper fi!


This is the AmericanCourage Newsletter and includes current events and current event opinions. There have been a few things developed recently I want to here your opinion.

  WASHINGTON (AP) - The man accused of plotting with al-Qaida to detonate a ``dirty bomb'' inside the United States was a protege of a top lieutenant of Osama bin Laden, traveling at his mentor's request to meet with other   terrorists and using the Internet to research how to build a radioactive weapon, U.S. officials said Tuesday.

How quickly and efficiently we get info from these guys and how we handle finding them in the future will influence how safe we are and how safe our troops are in the field. Some people are upset with the arresting procedures. What do you think? Are we sacrificing too many or our liberty?  One poll indicates 4 of 5 would give up rights for safety.

Secondly, it seems since there has not been another attack since 9-11 we are getting comfortable again and want to get back to life as usual. We do not want to be bothered by terrorist, war, the military, violence. It is inconvenient and uncomfortable. What do you think?

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Hi Sarge;
I just finished reading all the letters about Marine living conditions.  Well, they've got it all wrong. Today's Marines are being socially abused, the poor things. Back in my day 42 - 45 I was in the infantry 2nd Bn. 9th Marines and I clearly recall that on Iwo Jima the Seabees built personal air-conditioned huts for each of us. We slept in until 10:00, played volley ball and baseball, went swimming in the surf and at night our Platoon Sergeant used to make us hot chocolate then help us put on out "jammies" and read to us until we fell asleep.  We played so hard that over 30,000 died or were hurt.  Those who came back never talked about the living conditions.
 Larry Kirby
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Dear Sgt. Grit,
         I just recently signed up for your newsletter and have been thoroughly enjoying it. In response to the touching letter Cpl. D. Cogdill sent you-- I understand. My grandfather, SSgt Warren K. Roseberry, died December 6, 1996, and although I was still pretty young then I can remember the sad yet honorable day in Arlington National Cemetery.  I regret the fact that my grandfather died before he and I had a chance to sit down and talk about his days in the Marines. I'm not sure if he would have wanted to reminisce very often, since he unfortunately lost his leg during his time served, but I know he was a proud Marine and looked damn good in that uniform that caused my eyes to light up whenever I saw him in it.  I just turned 16 in May, and already have my mind set on following in the steps of both my grandfather and his father as a Marine -- and it's
because of the influence these men have had on my life. I frequently sit down and look through a couple boxes of his stuff that have trickled down through the family since his death, and I find myself more inspired each time.  I want to end by thanking all Marines who fought in the past and who are currently fighting. I'm sad to say that until September 11, I really didn't have a tight grasp on what freedom and loyalty to our country actually means. I admit to sitting down and crying once the realization hit me and I now truly understand why my grandfather and men like him stood up and fought.

God Bless the Marine Corps and may His angels watch over you all-- Gillian Roseberry
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"Let's stop waiting for terrorists to do us harm and start
doing them harm.  We shouldn't be thinking about deterrence.  We should be planning to wipe them out, starting now, and then start planning the victory parades." --Cal Thomas
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Sgt. Grit:
I've been reading your newsletter for approximately 3 years and look forward to every issue.  I am an eighth grade American History teacher and football coach and was raised in a military family ( father served in Korea, sister is a former Marine too). I am quite comfortable with the military way of doing things,  however, I have not served in the military.  Each year I am fortunate enough to take a group of eighth grade students to Washington, DC for a 4 day/3 night tour of our Nations Capitol.  When we stop and tour the U.S. Naval Yard the majority of kids follow me to the U.S. Marine Corps Museum.  We leave a sizeable donation and the kids enjoy the awesome history of the finest military force in the world.  And, of course, the kids load-up on souvenirs from the gift shop. When talking to students who have gone on this trip from past years, the U.S. Marine Corps Museum is the one stop they always refer back to the most.  I try to implement the Management Principals of the Marine Corps in my teaching and coaching whenever applicable because, in my family there was only one way to do things and that was the Marine Corps way.  One last comment:  don't get the wrong idea, I'm not a "wanna-be."  I'll be the first to admit, I'm a "never was" and a "never will be", however, I can admire the awesome tradition of the finest military force in the world.  Thank God for the U.S. Marine Corps.
Michael Fisher
8th grade American History Teacher
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I was reading some comments on the living conditions for marines.  Anyone else get to enjoy the plush huts at Del Mar Ca. in the 1949 time period.  ACLU definitely wouldn't have approved those for prisoners. Somehow after my spell at PI they seemed like good living to me. When I got to Korea they seemed like the Hilton. Nice to see them upgrading for the troops however.
Jack 1Sg Bn
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Hya Sgt Grit and everybody.  Well, since y'all was talking about barracks on Military bases, I would like to put my two cents in.  I joined the U.S.Army, October 1962 till October 1965.All of the barracks I lived in, U.S.A. were the old style wooden barracks except for one.  The barracks I lived in Nam were bricks with some sort of plaster over the bricks or whatever it was.  The top half to the barracks in Nam was screen wire and tin roofing, Vietnamese people kept the barracks clean and straightened up.  I once lived in one of the new air conditioned type of barracks for about two months at Ft.Hood,Texas,1965, till I pi,,ed off a certain Officer and he had me transferred to another company at Ft. Hood that still was using the old style wooden barracks.  (Thank You, Officer :[) I don't know about most people in the Military nowadays as far as their preferences of what kind of barracks they like best is, but I always preferred the old wooden barracks myself.
Semper Fi!
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Well, lets see, where to start......  I read some of the messages regarding living conditions in the military.  As I was smart enough to join the Air Force in 1969 I was able to par take of the living conditions afforded us Air Force members.  I remember tech school in Texas, marching to and from school each day.  I remember learning about being an aircraft mechanic to be able to repair the planes used by the Air Force to fly over and cover the Marines ass.  I remember going over to Danang and working in the same heat, dust, dirt, grime and danger from snipers and rocket attacks.  I remember seeing my aircraft blown apart by rockets and waiting for crews that never came back.  I remember the Marines at Danang... damned if I didn't live in the same type housing they did.  Shared the same bunkers they did.  I'm tired of hearing of how much harder the Marines and Army troops had it.  THEY chose (excluding draftees) the branch of service they went  in, so did I.  So stop comparing and  whining.  I was being drafted into the Army when I enlisted and looked at all branches of the military.  I liked what I saw as far as education and career fields.  I was protected by Marines and the Air Force protected Marines in the field.... seems to me to be a wash.
Fred Lewis
USAF 1969-73
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This is in response to Angela the Airman/Marine Wife. In her comments she doesn't recall maid service or a wake-up call at any AF base. I attended the Chaplains Asst. course at Kessler AFB, in Biloxi MS and was considered prior service because I came from the fleet not directly from a "boot camp" and yes we had maid service, and could arrange for a wake-up call if we wished. I didn't use the wake-up service because they didn't have it prior to 0600 and as a Marine I was up before that. We lived in two man rooms, had cable, a small fridge, and wall to wall carpet. I got really spoiled prior to having to return to the FMF, but there we still had it really good.
Chris Harris 82-86
L/Cpl USMC now and forever.
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Grit
To Major Cox in Reference to Ms Steele. AYE AYE SIR!!!
SSgt Rock
7th MAR DIV
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Semper Fi!
Bless all of you!  My Dad was a Marine, wounded on Iwo Jima, later dying as a result of those wounds.  My husband is a Marine, my son-in-law is Army, my son is Air Force, my brother is Navy. Guess we have it all wrapped up. So- let's all pull together, we all have loved ones who are missed, no matter what branch of the military.  For those of you Moms who are anxiously awaiting some word from a beloved son or daughter, I can identify with that as well.  Those knuckleheads just don't know how much we Moms miss them and wait for any word from them, even a post card. For those active duty member who might be reading this, remind yourself and your fellow Marines, soldiers, and sailors to write home more often, even if just a note.  Really a morale builder!
Sarah E

Note from Sgt Grit....Listened to your Mama.
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A few years ago I was researching to put up a display on Native American Code Talkers for the VA I work at.  Like everyone else I had heard of the famous Navajo Code Talkers that the USMC used in the Pacific in WWII.  However I was amazed to find out that there were actually over a dozen different Indian tribes doing code talking in their native languages.  They were used by both and all used the same techniques, their tribal language with innocent words used for modern military terms and once the terms were agreed to, they were able to talk with each other without having to go through the decoding or translating process because they knew exactly what they meant, but Lord, help the poor enemy Soldier who was trying to intercept their messages and explain their meaning to his Commo Officer.  Obviously the local commands had to have Code Talkers from the same tribes or this would not have worked.  I send this just to make sure that all of the Code Talkers get their credit.  I am not at work and so do not have the list of tribes that participated in these programs.  I could send it later if you wish.
Dave Hancock
SF X 2
Army and Marine Corps Both
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Good job on this news-letter. I missed reading about the mother who complained about  her son's living conditions, but I'd like her to hear from me.  My son, a proud MARINE, is living in a tent, with guns & stuff, near other tents somewhere, not anywhere near home.  He is in a dangerous classified area, and hasn't complained once.  I would be too ashamed to complain about anything in his life since he became a Marine. He is extremely proud of his uniform , job and the talents that the Corps has given him.    Our family got to see his pride, through our tears, in 1999 when he came home for his fathers funeral. My Marine son , in full dress uniform, with extreme dignity,  performed  a flag ceremony over his fathers gravesite.  His father was a VietNam Veteran, and former Peace Officer. Although we had   members of the Air Force, and the Police Department also there at the funeral, there was a special  respect, a soft sigh, as our Marine honored his father the way the Corps taught him.  My son re-enlisted right after September 11th,and we still haven't heard him complain, so I won't either.  BJS, California

I told ya, listen to you Mama. Sgt Grit
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Dear Sgt Grit,
WElcome back from your few days liberty; no doubt with
Mrs. COLONEL GRIT! HAHA!  I wanted to respond to Angela, the Marine Wife (first) and USAF airmen (second). GOOD FOR YOU SWEETHEART! IT's young men and women like you who make our country what it is! I'm a proud Marine (not former, just not active, but still kicking a**), but have also spent time in the CA Army National Guard (trying to clean it up Marine Corps style). Be proud
of your uniform, your branch of service, and your country.  Real lifetakers and heartbreakers like you know what the deal is; let the clowns who want to fight over all that crap do it; stand proud, and since you are the wife of one of my little brothers I got two words for ya! SEMPER FI!
Steve Arnold
USMC 1988-92
Desert Storm vet and drunken s**t kicker!
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Sgt Grit,  I just have to giggle with glee,  cause I know where that Air Force base with maid service is!  MISAWA, JAPAN, cause I was there.  I was deployed with VMFA 122 out of MCAS Beaufort, SC and after months of living in GP tents we did a deployment to Misawa to show those very zoomies how it's done!  After numerous competitions, which our unit won and an illegal toga party we were politely asked  to go the hell back to Yechon, Korea.  Imagine what it was like to stay in almost brand new barracks, that DID in fact have maid service, and color TV's, refrigerators, carpeting in every room,  private bathrooms, and a front office where you could check out videos, or have the video shown like pay per view.  Oh and the dining facility, it was still the chow hall back then, served lobster and steak several times a week, was wall to wall plush carpeting,
and actual dining tables and chairs, drapes on the windows, chandeliers ...it was like a nice restaurant.   The Air Force didn't stay for Team Spirit '88 in Yechon, South Korea, they left after only 9 days having declared conditions too harsh, that's why we ended up going to them.  We'd been there in Yechon all winter and stayed until July, MCAS Iwakuni flight line had been torn up for repair work.  So we flew our F/A 18's out of Yechon.   I just have to laugh!!
 OOOOORAAAAHHH!  (Cpl) Anna Grabill '86-'91
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Hell what's all this about Camp Pendleton barracks and housing. I was on the working party from Camp Elliot when we put up the first tents in a mud flat there which is now the airfield. And in my 32 years as a Marine I spent time at Camp Pendleton, when I wasn't overseas and I never found living conditions bad.
MGYSGT Keith Vaughn, USMC Ret. 1942-1974
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Sgt Grit,
I have been reading your Marines and Marine families letters for a while now and have something to say. First I am the mother of 2 proud Marines.  It was very hard to see them go one 6 years later than the older, it was hard to hear of their difficulties in the Corps, which I couldn't help with but be here and stay supportive to them. They came back as men, I sent boys. I am very proud of them. Now for the real reason for this letter.  In November my youngest stationed at Miramar had a serious motorcycle wreck.  I told my husband I was going and staying until my son was physically able to come home. My daughter and I arrived to find several Marines at the airport who took us to the hospital. Our stay there was never with out a Marine at our assistance especially the one Gunny but my sons' friends brothers). I have seen brotherhood at Vietnam Vet reunions etc but never aw the brotherhood I saw from the Marines in that hospital. I left my son with his brothers feeling good about it knowing they were a lot better for him than the friends he has here at home. That brotherhood made us feel so much better and the treatment we received there was really unbelievable to us. I thank them very much for it even though I know it was being a Marine buddy and friend.
 Patricia
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Sgt. Grit,

I would like to just convey my thoughts and prayers for the reader who wrote in only 2 hours before getting married. I remember when I got married and how much of a nervous wreck I was, I would have never attempted to type or write anything or even try to think on the day of my wedding, Brave man. But on to what I have to say about him pinning his families Ancestry cape to his Wife's Shoulder with his father's EGA. Semper Fi, Although some might see it as him not being the one who earned the title of Marine and thus not having the right to wear it himself as he stated, I do not see it that way. Now if it was for any other reason other than to honor his father who did earn the title of Marine than that would be different. I would just like to say in Final remarks to Brendan, Enjoy the future with your new wife and remember that your father left you a legacy that can be passed on to your children and their children for many generations to come. I joined the Marines for many rea! son's and reading your letter just reminded me of one of those reason's HONOR!. Semper Fi
Brad Fox
Cpl. 94-98
HMH-363, 1st MAW, ASE
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Sarge:
Just to name a few I don't hear or see in some of the responses about what a "Holy Joe" or "Pogy Bait" is? Reading some of the comments about barracks, when we had a Holy Joe (cleaning the barrack floors with a bucket of water and sand with a brick  you can bet your ___ the floor was clean..this was in boot of course in a Quonset hut at PI...Pogy Bait being a bar of candy...what are some of the new sayings now?  I'm now 73 and try to stay active with our Marine Corps League..most of us are getting too old to do
some of the things required and are desperate for new YOUNG members.. check out your local detachment and join up. You may have left the active corps...but it never left you. Pitch in and help.
Walt Kozier / Second Division / 8th Marines / FMF /  1946
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The living conditions  issue makes me laugh. Try Korea, 1951-1952 I never met one crybaby in my whole year as a BAR man. The new Corps is soft.
Dr S Gerber B1/5
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Sgt. Grit ;  I lived in Tents, Quonset Huts , Barracks and on a bed roll on the docks of Sasebo, Japan - The best was at Quantico in brick barracks building and the worst in old wooden Japanese baracks (with no indoor plumbing) - I'm not complaining. It was a great experience.  Art Gaucher
5th Div. and other detachments - WWll  1943-1946
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Sarge,

After reading the responses about living conditions at military bases, I just had to put in my "Two Cents worth".

As a Naval Reserve Corpsman assigned to a Marine Artillery Battalion while on the civilian side, working as a contract instructor for the Army; I think I have seen most types of living spaces except a foxhole in combat and enlisted berthing aboard ship. All I can say about it is be happy you have a roof over your head when you are at a state-side or over-seas base. Remember, it could be worse as many Veterans, "Old Timers", and "Lifers" will tell you. Now granted, some barracks, BEQ's and BOQ's could use a "Face Lift" and some remodeling, they are still a home and may even hold sentimental or historical value to those who have gone before.

Now, as I work primarily with Reservists, I have seen some things. One unit had GP Medium and Large sleep tents with DSS dishes on them. I guess home is where you make it. I have also heard some of these people longing to get back to the barracks and out of the tents two days into a two week field exercise. And the at the base I work at, the Barracks were built in the early 1940's and have been remodeled only slightly.

As for me, I keep transferring to units that keep getting me closer and closer to the front line. So any building that has a solid roof and walls, running hot water and a bed with clean sheets that I don't have to share with anything that has more or less legs than me, I'll live there. I'll even chip in and help fix the place up.

And to those who have been there before, Thanks for leaving the place standing so that I could share some of the same feelings and good times as you have.

HM1 Matt Sagaser, USNR
HQ BTY, 1/14 Marines, 4th MARDIV
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Dear Sgt. GRIT;
I did not read the letter in which there was a complaint or
concern about living conditions in the Corps. However, I did
read the several replies. Most interesting to me was the one from the "Sarge" from PI in 1953 since he was in the 7th.Bn at the same time that I served there as a D.I. We did live in squad tents with M1940 kerosene stoves for warmth in the winter of '53-'54. Too much kerosene and the bugger would turn cherry red and one then really knew the purpose of a fire watch!  A communal head was standard. Church was in Officer's Country past Iron Mike. When the 7th closed down in May of '54, I moved to Dog Co., 1st Bn to a white wooden barracks--again with a communal head. Open squad bays were the norm. When I was finally transferred to Guard Company, Hq.Bn, open squad bays again. GREAT LIVING conditions. I can't speak of conditions today. But in '53-'55, we all lived together, ate together, used the facilities together, did duty together, pulled liberty together (remember Liberty Cards?),. I'm
sure that today's Marines do much the same as we did then. No one complained. That's not to say that we didn't have an occasional gripe about something (usually a senior NCO or an Officer) but we would joke about morale being so low that it had no way to go but up.  Keep up the good work with your newsletter and the forum that it provides for all of us...Marine and others.
Paul T. Kirsch
PISC DI '53-'54; MP'54-'55
Ret. CWO-4 (Marine Gunner)
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WELL I HAD TO WRITE ABOUT MY BARRACKS DAYS AT SAN MATEO FROM 97 TO 2000.  THE BARRACKS WERE IN BAD SHAPE BUT WE ARE TALKING ABOUT WHEN YOUR TAKING A SHOWER IN THE COMMON HEAD SOMEONE TAKING A DUMP AN YOU GET CRAP COMING UP THREW THE DRAINS OF THE SHOWER WHEN IT GOT FLUSHED. HERE IS MY FAVORITE
THE  MICE YES THAT'S RIGHT ONE TIME I'M DOING A BARRACKS INSPECTION AND THIS DEVIL DOGS BELT AND TROUSERS HAD GOT CHEWED UP. IT WAS HILARIOUS.  WE TRAIN HARD AN WORK HARD SO WE SHOULD HAVE SOMETHING NICE BUT I CAN TELL
YOU ONE THING ABOUT THOSE BARRACKS THE BROTHERHOOD WAS STRONG I WOULD ONLY TELL OUR FELLOW MARINES ABOUT THESE THINGS HERE BECAUSE MY MARINES NEVER MOANED OR COMPLAINED ABOUT IT. THEY ACTUALLY WENT AND BOUGHT SNAKES PYTHONS AN USED TO FEED THE MICE THAT THEY CAUGHT. IT WAS STILL A GREAT TIME I DON'T THINK MARINES GRIPED ABOUT IT. WE ACTUALLY WENT TO BASE HOUSING AN TOOK GRASS SEED TO GROW GRASS IN FRONT OF OUR ROOMS AND FIELD DAYED EVERY WEEK.  I WOULD NOT CHANGE A THING ABOUT IT THEN BUT THAT IS WHY THEY KEEP  THE FIRST MARINE DIVISION UP NORTH AWAY FROM THE FSSG  AIR WING AND BASE MARINES. ALL IN GOOD FUN BROTHERS AND ACTUALLY WE ALSO GOT INFESTED BY BEES THROUGH THE PIPES IN OUR BUILDING FORGOT ABOUT THAT ONE.
 SSGT HARP
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Have to agree with those voicing opinions of the bitching over living quarters...What amazes me the most was a news clip showing PI Marine boots disassembling an M16 by the numbers. The table tops had outlines of each piece. So much for doing it blindfolded. But then the M1 Garand was after all a simple weapon.
W.D. Ravgiala, Jr. GYSgt. USMC Ret. Parris Island 1958 Plt 212.
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I JUST CANT GET OVER THE WAY MARINES LIVE , MARINES  CAN   LIVE ANY WHERE SLEEP ON ANYTHING , IN 1963 AT MCRD PLT 323 YOU WERE LUCKY TO SLEEP AT ALL , AND THE LIVING CONDITION WE SLEEP IN STEEL HUTS AND NO HEADS , STANDING IN LINE  TO SHOWER AND MAKE A HEAD CALL, THAT WAS EASY. MAY BE THE LADY'S SON SHOULD HAVE NOT BEEN MARINE , I WAS IN IN 1963 AND GOT OUT IN 1969 AND WOULD DO IT ALL OVER, MARINES DO WHAT THEY NEED TO DO THAT'S WAY WE ARE MARINES UNDER ANY CONDITION OOOOOHRAAAA
   SEMPER FI PJFRANK CPL 63 69
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Hey Sergeant Grit,
I have written to your newsletter numerous times but this is the first time I am responding to another's message.  CPL Steve Stanfield, USMC and presently in the National Guard, had some very disparaging words about the Army.  CPL Stanfield, please don't label the entire Army because of your recent experiences in the Guard.

My Marine active duty experience was as an 0311 and a Scout Sniper from '76 to '79.  Like everyone else when out I was immediately approached by the Guard and Army ROTC.  I brushed them both aside.  After college in 1984 I attempted Marine OCS but was turned down.   Even with a 3.6 GPA, 3 solid years as a grunt and an updated 300 PT I was not accepted.  A broken knee with some screws in it was enough for a show stopper.  Waited a few more years then was approached by a local Army reserve unit and this time I did not brush them aside.  Like you CPL Stanfield the culture shock was amazing.  But I took it on as my mission to teach them about our Corps.  I also worked my ass off to beat everyone of them on every range, at PT, at everything.

I have now been in the Army Reserves since 1989.  I have been in some very ate up units, and some extremely squared away ones.  There are a huge number of Marines in the Army and they help raise the Army's standards.  In one battalion I served with the CO, XO, 1st Sgt and Sergeant Major were all Marines!  I have served with numerous Rangers and Special Forces soldiers.  These guys did not go through what we Marines went through.  Then again, most Marines have not gone through what they have.  I have been the acting Command Sergeant Major of a Special Operations Battalion in Minnesota for the past two years.  I have the honor of leading some Rangers, some combat tested soldiers, some young and very promising soldiers and some Marines.  Most have been downrange on a number of different missions.  This unit is far from "nasty".

Cpl Stanfield you stated that Army is not a place for Marines.  I totally disagree.  A Marine is competent in every clime and place.  Finish your time in your Guard unit.  And while you are there use your Marine abilities and training to make it a better unit.    There are few Marine reserve units and many Army ones.  If a Marine can get into a Marine unit - great!  But if not do not hesitate to join another branch.  Serving in the Army has made me a Better Marine, and by being a Marine I have made many soldiers better warriors.
Semper Fi
Gerry Krage
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Sgt Grit,
     I am writing this in response the Devil Dog and airline pilot that wrote in to the last "courage" news letter.  I am a MARINE also..  However I am currently serving as an Air Marshal.  I am on the "do not arm" side of the coin, but that is not why I am writing to you.  The Men and Women that make up our team are being maligned daily by the media and the pilot's association.  Many of us are MARINES and damn proud of it.  We are trained to the highest standards of any FED agency.  Our minimum qualification score on the range is the same score that most other agencies set for their instructors.  We routinely requalify on the "advanced" course and are some of the best shots out there.  We practice "surgical shooting skills" and
are good at it. I for one am getting tired of seeing my brothers and sisters who lay it on the line every day get mistreated and maligned by a group of people whom we protect just so that they can further their own agenda.  If the merits of the issue are strong enough stand on them not on lies and deceit.  The MARINE CORPS taught me integrity and courage  and for those who have forgotten the meaning of this maybe they need to break out their 'green monsters' and read up on it.  'nuff preaching.  To ALL those
past and present  SEMPER FI!!!!!!!
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I understand that a mom could have living conditions on the mind, mine sure did. But when I was at Camp Margarita and in open squad bays, it was real comfy. Easy to clean and although it was concrete, I at least had a home. Sure is a lot better than what many of our brothers have right now on the streets or forgotten. Thank you mom for caring and voicing your words. We the brothers of this Marine do care and we at least understand that you remember your son, when so many today forget about their own kids. Although this Marine of yours no longer is in your nice clean home, he is probably better off in the mud and the grime where he feels a lot at home. Your voice is welcomed to our ears because you saw what America does not want to see, Real Marines and not the Hollywood Movie version.  Be glad that his heating works because we had Heat in the Summer and Air conditioning in the Winter. Must be a government thing. But we did have the EM Club and a First Sergeant that made sure we were never bored.  Today the kids of America seem to be bored. Too much of this computer
vision and not enough playing in the mud. Kind of funny when you look at it. Women pay real big bucks to have a mud pack...Marines get paid to pack mud!  Mom! Don't worry about your young Marine. He is happy doing what he is proud to do. He is with the finest in the world. Sometimes living in the barracks is better than Osama in the caves. At least in the Marine Corp he will, get paid (when the government is not broke as in the past happens, but he will get paid), eat good food (Hey Remember C-Rats?), get
the best training in the world, be stronger then when he went in, Be looking a Hell of a lot better than me right now...To much long hair!, He will love you much more now than he did then. He will have more respect and ask for very little except for more rounds to shot, more targets to hit and when he is back from the field, he really could careless about the open squad bay or what ever he is living in because after the showers, he is probably hitting, EM Club, LIBO, EM Club, and then coming back hitting the rack and doing it all over again.  When I was in I was glad I did not have to live with no heater, weird food (sorry do green eggs and ham count?), the bus to take you to town, and a mom who like so many mom's are proud of their Marine and want the best for their son.  (Mom if you really want fun, go visit Bridgeport Mountain Warfare school, were your son along the rest of all 1st MARDIV Marines get to go on vacation and play on the rocks or make an igloo) (hey at least we had fun, we even went fishing up at the little store cabin up the road, went exploring and even a little gambling) (psst...don't tell mom about Carson City and the Mustang Ranch). Mom the best advice any of us brothers can give you for sympathy (be nice now bros) get a hold of your Congressman/Senator, contact the media, let America know that these Marines are the finest and deserve the best. The families that live in poverty and has to apply for food stamps, as the husband fights for freedom remember these Marines. Remember the Marine who is in VA Hospital, dying from God knows what and no one remembers them but a brother and sister Marine and a family member how cares and there are very little lately. These people all alone and fighting a new war called Financial aid and admissions. Remember the retirement system that is failing our most dedicated Marines and when they retire have to buy their own insurance, and get very little help as in advice because Congress has changed the rules on all Military that served. Remember the Flag when you write to these people because your son, our brother Marine is holding that flag up for you to see.  Thank you mom for your kind words for our Marines because we are a lot happier as all kids are when we play in the mud. And no we will not shower until the fat lady sings!
Semper Fi Mom
"A battery operated Grunt"
2/5 comm
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My son graduated from PI, 8/18/00, and went on to Camp Geiger for Infantry School.  He never completed the school, although he came within a week of doing so, because of intense pain in his knee which he tried for weeks to hide.  He was finally diagnosed with a loss of cartilage and discharged in November of that year.  He was and still is devastated over this turn of events and is still trying to fix things and get back in to serve for a time with the Marine Corps Reserves then hopefully move back into active service.  He would be the first to agree with Cpl. Stanfield.....others have told him he would be welcomed into one of the other branches, but he refuses to even try....according to him, he's a Marine and only a Marine, his heart and soul are there.  However.......his twin brother joined the Army and went to Ft. Sill in May 2001, MOS - Artillery.  He graduated from Basic/ATC in September and headed for Ft. Benning, GA for Airborne School.  He graduated from there 10/4/01 and is presently stationed at Ft. Bragg with the 82nd Airborne.  My husband and I just visited there last week for "All American Week" and I just wanted to report that seeing those young men perform their duties, full of pride and responsibility for what they do was quite a sight.  We went to the Sicily Drop Zone and watched a "heavy drop" of hummers, howitzers, etc. and 7 C130's each full of 64 paratroopers.  Many, many of these same young men, my own son included, will very soon be headed to Afghanistan where I know they will do us proud.  My Airborne son is proud of his Marine brother, but he is also very proud of his Army Airborne brothers and the jobs they do - no slack here!  Some nasties????,  I'm certain of it, but there are nasties in every branch..............yes, even the beloved Corps.  So, young Cpl. Stanfield, please don't judge the entire United States Army on your bad experience.  I don't doubt what you've experienced there, but I see the pride my son has in what he does, I hear in his voice the knowledge he has when he talks about "his" howitzer, the jumps he's made, and his anticipation of what lies ahead for him and his brothers in the 82nd.  When they are together, my sons are constantly cutting the other one's branch of the service, but when it comes down to  "Honor, Courage, Commitment", they have it for their Country, for each other and for every other brother or sister who serves with them, and I have no doubt they would give whatever it might take to help save their Country or another Soldier, Sailor, Airman, Marine, Coast Guard.........whoever.  Sorry to ramble on, but I felt the need to stand up for my Army son and would gladly and proudly do the same for my Marine.  Remember, it's us against them, not us against us.  All the best to you Cpl. Stanfield, and I sincerely hope you get back to where you belong because you are too good a Marine to be spending time languishing somewhere else.  Good luck to you and Semper Fi!  Thanks Sgt. Grit for all you do, for all you've done and to all the rest of you Marines for the same.   God Bless all of you.
Jane Starliper
Very Proud MILITARY Mom

Remember listen to your Mama!!  Sgt Grit
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Ever since I've received your newsletter, I've wanted to write and say hello, and with nearly every letter I read in the newsletter, I often want to reply, but don't.  My son forward your newsletter quite awhile back.  He is Sgt. Harrell, doing MP duty in Hong Kong.  I am the proudest that I have ever been of my son.  I love this country and proud that when the Star Spangled Banner plays it brought tears to the eyes of my son, and my daughter.  In the years of their growing up, I never realized that I had instilled that in them.  I also cry for almost anything and everything.  I just love my country and have a new respect for all military.  We all live in and love the same U.S.A.   But of course, I am greatly partial to the USMC.  I love you guys, everyone...........
Joe's Mom
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Enough about the living conditions. I can't take anymore. I never realized how deprived I was until I read some of these comments.

I went thru boot camp in the hot wooden barracks of 1st Bn at P.I. We didn't have time to worry about the conditions.

I also spent 2 years in old Japanese WWII barracks. I don't remember ever getting up early enough for a hot shower. Tell me about the privacy we had during maneuvers on Taiwan. I didn't see the head for 6 weeks. It was entrenching tool, toilet paper and a little bit of real estate adjacent to the flight line, take care of business and cover it up. Don't get me wrong, there was a head but not nearby. We had it made. It was the Air Wing. No one was shooting at us!!!

I can't remember bad chow....even the C rations (God knows how old they were) were OK..............and for you knew guys we had B--E--E--R!!!!!!

I'm rambling now.........back to the original point: There is only one way for Marines to live and that is in groups; whether it be tents or squad bays. You don't have to like the guy in the bunk next to you, but you'll learn how to get along. It's better to sacrifice some privacy to learn something about the Marines that events may require you to depend on.

G M Grivas
1960-1964
If there are any buddies out there its:
ggrivusmc@hotmail.com
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"Ultimately, property rights and personal rights are the same thing.  The one cannot be preserved if the other be
violated." --Calvin Coolidge
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Dear Sgt. Grit.  I've been off the main line for a while traveling the country.  I must have missed an issue or something because all this mumbo jumbo about living conditions in the Corps is foreign to me.  I have visited some bases recently and would like to see the Corps go back to open squad bays, Quonsets, tents etc.  The Corps is not a fraternity of College idiots but is supposed to be a cohesive unit fighting men (some women too).  We didn't need heaters in the Quonsets in 55, our DI's kept us busy enough to keep us warm.  Field days, scrub downs, duck walks, earthquake drills, flood drills, over and unders and we didn't mind when at last we were allowed to lay our heads on the flat unfluffed thing that was called a pillow.  The old F- - t Sack was very comfortable and morning always came too early.  What's the bi - -hing about this new dormitory rooms?  Has the Corps enlisted a bunch of spoiled sissies or other body parts that we were called.  Let's go back to the basics and save a lot of DOD money.
Gil Cron  Cpl 54 - 58 (58 - 62 reserve)
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Dear Sgt. Grit,

    I am writing to tell you how great your site is and to keep up the good work.  I just got done reading "Differences in the Military" and I think it is probably one of the truest things I have ever read on the internet.  I am 17yrs. old and I plan to go into the Marine Corps right after high school.  Out of all my friends at school I am the only one joining the Marine Corps, all the rest are going to Air Force and their attitudes are exactly how it was described in "Differences in the Military".  All they care about is staying out of combat and getting the most pay.  As for me I pray I will get the chance to serve my country in battle.  After reading "Differences in the Military" I felt so relieved that somebody felt the same way about the Navy and Air Force as I do even the person who wrote it ay be passed away.  I just wanted to let you know that your site is excellent and a fine example of how a Marine Corps site should be.  Again I thank you and keep up the good work!

your faithful reader and future Marine,
John Lonsdale
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SHOULD TRY A RED LINE BRIG LIKE MCAS IN YUMA , AZ, WAS IN FOR A BIT FOR SLUGGING A SWAB JOCKEY LOL THAT WAS HELL, GET PERMISSION TO
CROSS EVERY RED LINE TO GET TO HEAD S/SGT BEN DAVIS 1967-1979
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My first living spaces in the Marine Corps were the Quonset huts in 3rd Recruit Training Bn at San Diego and then squad tents at Camp Mathews for the rifle range. More Quonset huts at Camp San Onofre for ITR. Hell, for awhile there I thought that was all the Marine Corps had. I kinda liked them. When I finally got to live in barracks they were open squad bays and clean, even if they were old.  These living quarters, as has been stated in other letters, made for a tighter unit.  There was uniformity, thieves were almost unheard of. No one locked his locker or if you did all of your buddies knew the combination.  You could leave your wallet on your rack and someone would move it under your dust cover for you.  Your hut mates or barracks mates were a family.  Outside were well kept lawns, or in the case of San DIego and Pendleton, ice plants. Sidewalks and walkways were lined with white painted rocks and maybe a small fence of upright red metal rods with a painted chain (white or yellow)  linked from top to top. The Quonset huts  were clean, and neat and served us well. We took pride in the fact that we were not pampered like the other services....we were Marines!  We were the Spartans. We lived hard, played hard and fought hard.  Damn, I never had a "room" until I made SNCO.  So to the civilians who complain about the "awful" way today's marines have to live sharing 3 men to a room with one "bathroom" I have only two words.  "Shut up!"

Semper Fi
Gunny Dunc
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Dear Sgt. Grit, This is the first time I have written to you. I have read many of your newsletters and we have sent after some of your merchandise. The reason I am writing is to tell you I am a proud mom of a new recruit at Parris Island, S.C. My son John signed up last June and had to wait until he graduated to leave for boot camp. After Sept. 11th, a lot of people said that he probably wished he hadn't enlisted. You know what his response was! He graduated May 24th and left May 27th. Just want to let you know in August I will be able to say that I am a proud mom of a United States Marine.  Thanks for hearing me out!
Kim Cooper from Bonifay, FL
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"Moral truth is the same in every culture, in every time,
and in every place. ...We are in a conflict between good and evil, and America will call evil by its name.  We will lead
the world in opposing it." --President George W. Bush
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Sgt Grit,
    Just wanted to commend you on your outstanding newsletter and share some thoughts. I attended a Memorial Day Service held by the local VFW at a cemetery in town. There were probably 15 VFW members there, most were elderly, some couldn't stand for the whole service. What touched me was that even though they may have had physical limitations, at least they attended.  I encourage all Marines to join your local American Legion or VFW. Any help, I'm sure, would be greatly appreciated.
Semper Fi
Josh Malinowski
SSGT 1987-1996
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Hey Grit,
    Semper Fi! I'm halfway thru reading the latest newsletter and as always, its great. I just read the following:

"ONE QUESTION...........

I only have one question in reference to the below sea story from the Intel Gunny. VMGR 352 is a C130 squadron, which only had Flight Equipment personnel assigned then and present, not any seat mechs. Second, C130's do not have any Martin Baker products (Ejection Seats) past present and future models.  Third, what "cartridge" is the author referring to? Just a friendly note.
Thanks
Roman "Ski" Milanowicz
Sgt USMC 68-74
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 Sgt Grit,
My name is Amadna and I am doing a research paper for my college writing class on the Vietnam War.  I was wondering if you had any ideas as to how  I could get in contact with Vietnam Vets so I could interview them or even talk with them.  My e-mail address is collegemadgirl@yahoo.com if any of them would like to do that for me.

Thank you,
Amanda M. Totten
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I HAVE NOT A CLUE AS TO WHERE THOSE CIVILIANS GET OFF EVEN COMPLAINING ABOUT LIVING CONDITIONS LET US NEVER FORGET THOSE FALLEN AND NEVER FORGOTTEN ONES WHO GAVE THERE LIVES SO WE MAY ENJOY OURS  BILL WISEMAN   USMC
78-82
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Sgt. Grit,
In answer to Bob H. who posted that VMGR 352 is a C130 squadron and only has Flight Equipment personnel and no seat mechanics, yes, they did have seat mechanics in 65-67.  There were no ejection seats, but there was a Safety &
Survival shop which took care of the air conditioning & pressurization systems, oxygen systems, and fire bottles.  And, when I said I was tossing the cartridges in the air and catching them, I was part of the I&I with an F-8 reserve squadron.  Bob H. sounds like a parachute rigger, and there's always been a friendly rivalry between the seat mechs and the riggers.  So be it.  If he would like to discuss it further, check the bulletin board, and you'll find my contact info in the profiles.
Stay safe all,
IntelGunny
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I just wanted everyone to know that my marine (Cpl. Darren W. Lamica) is coming home today!!!  I know that six months isn't as long as alot of you all have had to be separated from one you love...but it's been long enough for me!!  He's been in Okinawa, Japan...and it's been a long six months with a lot of phone calls and I love you's.  But he's finally coming home.  God Bless the United States Marine Corp and may God keep you all safe and well.  Semper Fi!!
Sincerely,
Kimberly W.
Huntsville, AL
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