Sgt Grit Marine Corps Merchandise

Welcome to our Marine Corps Newsletter archives. Here you can find USMC articles and memories sent in to us by fellow Jarheads and their families. Enjoy!

Sgt Grit Marine Corps Newsletter - November 7, 2002

Sgt. Grit, In your newsletter of 24OCT02 (short rounds), it is stated that you are a Marine until you are dead. The Marine Corps Hymn tells us that the streets of Heaven are guarded by United States Marines. My son, PFC Vernon Whitman, is one of those guards. If you get to heaven - it would not be in your best interest to tell him that he is not a Marine. A proud Marine parent, Paul Whitman HM1 (FMF) USN Retired


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HAPPY BIRTHDAY MARINES!!!!

Subject: Marine Corps Birthday Message

10 November 2002

A MESSAGE FROM THE COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS

We all know that a powerful combination of teamwork and
individual achievement forms the strength of our Corps.
We are Marines, first and foremost. Through innovation,
trust, and mutual respect, we have evolved into an
adaptive and flexible fighting force ideally suited for
21st Century challenges. Though the character of war
continually changes, we understand that the nature of
war is timeless: that the ultimate arbiter of battle is
the human will. We recognize this, and we embrace the
values that strengthen our will and define our character.
For two hundred and twenty-seven years. Marines and their
families have dedicated themselves to the cause of the
defense of freedom. Our accomplishments adorn the masthead of the Battle Color of the Marine Corps for all to admire, and they reflect the importance of the legacy we
inherit and willingly accept.

Through shared experience and success in battle, we
distinguish ourselves by selfless service --- in a sense,
we are a fraternity of sacrifice. As stewards of our rich
heritage, we continually reflect upon the generations of
Marines who, in their time, faithfully answered our
country's call. In their example we will find the strength
and inspiration necessary to meet the coming challenges.
We celebrate this connection with our history, yet we
remain focused on the challenges of our future. We have
an important dual responsibility; to remain ready for today,
while transforming our capabilities to meet the
challenges of tomorrow.

We find profoundly gratifying, our life-long pride of
association with fellow Marines --- active, reserve,
veteran and civilian --- and the knowledge that we
contribute daily to securing our Nation's freedom.

I encourage all Marines to celebrate the camaraderie,
enrichment, and fulfillment of service with men and women
subordinated to a greater cause: preparing for an exciting
future and extending the legacy of our great Corps.

Happy Birthday, Marines!

Semper Fidelis,

JAMES L. JONES
General, U. S. Marine Corps


SINCE SEPT. 1962...................................................

Sgt. Grit
            This past Sept. 26th, 2002, a buddy I went through P.I. with, and me, went back to P.I. for a 40 year re-union. We met two other platoon members from Alabama. We were joined there, for a two day tour, by our JD, MsGSGT. Joe Pannasch.  To say the Island has changed a bit in 40 years, is a understatement. All three of my buddies have been back to P.I. before. This was my first time back since Sept. 1962. I can't describe the feeling that came over me as we witnessed a graduation, 40 years to the day, on the same day we graduated. There is something about this brotherhood, and sisterhood that cannot be equaled by any other military organization in the WORLD.  Thanks for this opportunity to share with the finest and best brothers and sisters in the WORLD
 L/CPL M.E.Earle 2009441
MCRD Parris Island, S.C.
Plt.147 June-Sept. 1962

P.S.  The train station in Yemassee is the same one
            that was there40 years ago.  Semper Fi


OLD BREED................................................

Semper-Fi Sgt. Grit, and to all Marines and former Marines.  I am, I suppose, one of  the Old Breed of my time. I joined up in Jan. 1942 and served through Guadalcanal, Cape Glouster, New Guinea and Pelelui. If we old timers paved the way for the young Marines coming after and you learned anything from us I am grateful. To be truthful I have to say that if I were the same person today as I was in '42 I really don't think I would be able to cut the mustered. The Marines today are so much smarter and technically advanced, you put us old timers to shame. I might add that goes for the women Marines too. If you have been accepted and passed the test you are a Marine as long as you live up to the Code. Chesty Puller once said "Old breed New breed makes no difference as long as its Marine Breed" Well I say substitute man for old breed and women for new breed and the Corps. will have no problems.  Any Place Any Time
Former Cpl. Frank Panetta


JUST AS THE TALIBAN.........................................

Mr. Russo,
First of all, thank you for your service to Country and Corps.
I am sure all Marines appreciate your concerns about the
quality of recruit training. Constructive criticism is essential,
for it is when the criticism dies that we fall into complacency.  However, I must disagree with your perception of recruit training and the present state of our Corps. Please bear in mind that the media has four primary functions: to entertain, to inform, to carry advertisements, and to make money for their stockholders. What you saw on the Discovery Channel was their interpretation of life at Parris Island. The producers simply could not include every aspect of recruit training while making an entertaining, informative, and profitable show. Numerous "documentaries" of recruit training have been made over the years; in order to remain competitive, the Discovery Channel simply had to present training in a new way. Somewhere between what was presented and what wound up on the cutting room floor, the truth lies. The only and best way to develop an objective view of training is to witness it yourself. I encourage you to visit one or both of our Depots; I am sure you will see a different view than what was presented by Discovery.  I can ensure you, Sir, that recruit training is just as physically, mentally, and emotionally demanding as the training you experienced. It is simply different. Just as different, I presume, as it was when you experienced it as compared to the Devil Dogs who fought at Chosin. The reason training has changed is because the world has changed. Yes, you saw male Marines receiving orders from female Marines. What I saw were junior Marines receiving orders from senior Marines. Marines are morally (and contractually) obligated to obey the orders of superiors ". . .acting according to the rules and articles governing the discipline of the Armed Forces of the United
States of America." This obligation exists without regard to
gender, race, religion, or any of the other divisions the
civilian world has. It is what makes us so powerful.
As for recruits talking to each other, this is absolutely
essential to successful completion of recruit training. One
of the first things I was told at PI and OCS (I am a product
of both schools) is that no one will complete training alone;
that teamwork is the only way we would make it through the
demands of entry-level training. This truth needs to be forged early in a Marine's career because, as you will agree, our Corps is built on teamwork. We have won our nation's battles for 227 years because Marines have fought together in an environment of teamwork and absolute trust.  The sheer amount of material that Drill Instructors are required to teach recruits in thirteen short weeks is astonishing. The staffs at each Depot must be commended for creating such a demanding and thorough training evolution in minimal time. DIs today are no less tough on recruits today then they were in 1964. Newly-minted Marines cannot be robots, as blind obedience to orders is not acceptable.  DIs are now challenged with being the "traditional" DI and the "traditional" NCO/SNCO at the same time. At no time are they ever "buddy-buddy" with recruits. Towards the end of training the role of the DI does change, ever-so-slightly, to facilitate the transition to the proper senior/subordinate relationship Marines are supposed to exhibit. (This also allows the new Marine to practice what he or she has learned during training, in a controlled environment). However, recruits always have (and always will) "push" right up until graduation.  Lastly, Sir, the present state of our Corps:  What has our Corps come to, you ask? Just ask the Taliban.
Semper Fidels
Matthew Rogers
Sgt USMC
1996-Present (and forever)


SOON TO BE SH*TBIRD...................................

Sgt. Grit,
        In reply to a newsletter received some weeks ago,
I know I'm not the fastest replying mother around but at
least I'm responsive.  A fellow Devildog had some comments about Marines receiving " Office Hours" through the U.C.M.J. and it being, what was it he stated, "Never is a recruit given his rights under the U.C.M.J. This is pure fraud in every since of the word.  This is what the Marine Corps calls improving the quality of recruits it receives.  Pure unfiltered Crap!!! "  And was signed as " When a Marine
was a Marine....Bullard P. "  Well Devildog Bullard P.,
not that I agree with giving Articles of the U.C.M.J. to
every Marine that seems to rectify his own beliefs of
breaking OUR Code, but I do believe that discipline needs
to be instewd in some bad apples that fall from the
sh*tbird tree.  I was told a few times by old salty Marines
that a Marine isn't a Marine until he has received a few
"Office Hours " or had lost a rank.  And speaking from
experience, it sure had helped me.  That's coming from a
Marine that was  L/Cpl twice and a Cpl twice before
receiving my 3rd stripe meritoriously all within 4 years
with the grunts.  I am the man and Marine I am today for
the reason of simply getting my a** squared away by a few
office hours and fellow Marines that took the time out to
rearrange this soon to be sh*tbird into a squared away Jarhead.
THANKS,
K.P. 89-97


RESERVISTS.....................................................

  I served twelve years as a Marine Reservist. Went through PI the winter of 62-63, Platoon 191, Bravo Company, First Battalion. The only difference between Reservists and Regulars was that we were issued less clothing and had less trouble packing our sea bags. No other distinction was made. I recall at that time the Army stuck NG and US on serial numbers to identify draftees and NG soldiers. Our serial numbers were identical to the regulars. We went from PI to Infantry Training Regiment at Geiger, which some in our unit considered about as tough as Boot Camp. All of this was before the massive buildup in Viet Nam, so there was no "avoiding Viet Nam" involved in Reserve enlistment. Let no person tell you that our status as Reservists made us lesser Marines.  Semper Fi! L.A. Reynolds, Sgt. 1939894.
..........

JUST A RESERVIST?
Anyone who thinks that Marine reservists' are just poorly
trained active duty troops should attend the USMC Tiger
Comp held every October at Fort Knox. Tiger Comp is a
competition between the 2 active and 2 reserve Marine tank battalions. It is the only competition of its kind in the
U.S. military where reserves face off against active duty
units. Each of the four tank battalions sends a representative crew to compete with their M1A1's for the coveted McCard Trophy. It is open to the public and you may be quite surprised to learn that the reservists' have won 2 out of the 6 last competitions. Not bad for part-time Marines!
Robert Peavey
5th & 3rd Tanks,
RVN 1968 - 69
..........

Sgt. Grit,
  Many thanks to Cpl. Tom McCourt and his comments about being "just a reservist".  Takes me back to MCRD 1967. In our platoon we had 60 Regulars and 20 Reservists, and ALL became Marines!!!  One poor guy was being used as "an example" by the DI's because not only was HE a Reservist but his FATHER was also a Reservist!! This treatment continued until only 2 weeks before graduation when it stopped suddenly!  It seems that the DI's had learned that the Reservist's father (Colonel, USMCR) had won the Medal of Honor on Guadalcanal and would be attending graduation!  Of course we all had known about his father. We had all enlisted together. I am always proud to say that I was sworn into The Marine Corps by a man who had received the Medal of Honor.
Eric Olson
Sgt. USMCR 1967-1973 and 1984-1988
..........

Sgt. Grit
  My name is Lance Corporal Simmons, Andrew T.  I have been a Marine since September 14, 2001 (that's right, I graduated PI 3 days after all h*ll broke out...imagine what it would be like at PI during that event).  I just wanted to touch on a few things if I may be permitted....   Women Marines are ok in my book.  Granted I don't believe they should be in combat on the front lines with men.  Lets be real, females react differently than males.  I don't know about other male Marines, but I would just rather have a male.  Females do have a slightly different training regiment than males...its no secret.  I do think that they train with just as much effort as the male Marines do.  I too saw the discovery channel show on "The Making of Marines".  I was disappointed as well, but I realize that they cant show everything that we do in boot camp because it would scare a lot of people off.  When I was in boot camp the Drill Instructors never talked to us like little kids....we got in the boot in the a** and the spit in the face all the good stuff that I expected.  I am glad I got the real deal instead of the mushy Bullsh@t that I saw on the Army boot camp.  I am currently a reservist with the Knoxville, TN unit. I am a Delta Co. Combat Engineer.  Any Marine, be male or female, had better realize that we are not "just reservist" for 1 weekend out of the month.  No where in my contract does it say "part time Marine".  I live, breath, sleep, and die United States Marine Corp.  No one can tell me that I didn't earn the title Marine.  Therefore I should be treated as such, no matter if active duty or reserve duty.  Thanks for letting me sound off a few Sgt. Grit.  LCpl. Simmons, Andrew T.
Delta Company, 4th CEB, 4th Marine Division
..........

The response in your newsletter of 10-24-92 by Cpl.
McCourt-0311, was well stated and to the point.(just
reservist). In l950, there were 70 thousand Marines,
world-wide, and 150 thousand reservist. There would
have been no Inchon invasion by the Marines if the
latter hadn't existed. General O. P. Smith was released from command in April '51, and his words were
"I think the division is better now than when we
landed at Inchon". As an aside, not once do I
remember when the other side was shooting at us with
any weapon, did I hear them ask if you were a regular
or reserve. I do know for certain that the results
were the same if you were hit by a bullet or shrapnel.
SF
NC
C-l-l, '51-'52
..........

I was pleased to read Cpl Tom McCort's reply regarding "Just a Reserve".  A very good response.  To add to his remarks I would like to put in my two cents.  Years ago I had the occasion to provide a class on the Reserve Program.  It may shock a lot of those out there to know that during the Korean conflict, the lst Marine Division was made up of 90% reservists.  Many do not know this fact, and what a job they did in Korea.  My background will reflect somewhat on this issue.  I quit high school in the 11th grade and enlisted in 1956, went to PISC for training and made meritorious PFC.  I was a "regular Marine" as some would say.  I served 9 years in the enlisted ranks to Sgt E5.  The Marine Corps had an annual WO Program which selected about 120 Marines each year.  At the time, I worked for a black Gunnery Sergeant by the name of Ricky Travers.  He asked me if I was going to put in for the program.  I said no as it was the first year I would be eligible and many who I knew had applied several times and never made it.  Well, about three days later GySgt Travers came up to me, handed me some papers, and told me to sign them.  It was the application for the WO program.  A short story, I was selected, went to Quantico for training and eventually made WO.  I will never forget this man.  I have always said I owe this man a lot - my career.  Two years later, the Marine Corps, in one of their off moments decided to offer me 2ndLt as a reserve officer.  I took it, remained on active
duty for the remainder of my 20 years and retired as a Major U. S.  Marine Cops Reserve.  Was I any different, h*ll no.  Just a Marine, as I am to this day.  But more important than all this is the fact that I was enlisted for nine years, the best of my life.  As we all know the backbone of the Corps is the young enlisted men, NCOs and SNCOs, regular
and reserve.  SF - Dan Stevens, Major USMCR(Ret)
..........


MARGATE, FL......................................................

Marines! On 10 November 2002,  the Marine Corps League Detachment 755 which meets in Margate Florida is having a renegade party celebrating the 227 the birthday of our Corps. The doors open at 1830 and the cake cutting ceremony recognizing the oldest and youngest Marines present will begin at 1930 with a color guard provided by the local recruiters, a cake escort, bag pipes, and a message by our guest of honor Maj Gen Larry Taylor who is the deputy director of Marine Forces Reserve.  There will be food, ship's store, raffles, and a cash bar.  Admission is free.    The party will be held at :  Margate Elks Lodge 2463 5451 NW 15th St  (near corner of St Rt 7 {441} & NW 15th st) Margate, Fl 33063  954-971-9690,  for more information contact
Mike Snyder 954-968-2069   reconman22@hotmail.com
or Frank Murphy 954-972-3009 theironcol@aol.com


DRILL INSTRUCTORS AND RESERVIST RIBBON

Marines,
I was thumbing through Sgt Grit's recent catalog and noticed that there was a ribbon for drill instructors.  (I also saw one for recruiters.)  Intrigued, I called HQMC to see if there was indeed a ribbon and, if so, was it retroactive for someone who was a DI before the award was given.  The answer was "yes" to both questions.  If you are a former DI who did not receive a ribbon, write
to the following address:
National Personnel Records Center
9700 Page Avenue
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
(ATTN: PERS313E)

You must tell them your name, SSN, DOB and period of service.  (I also included info on my period of service as a DI and the company and battalion with which I served.)  I imagine the same process would also be used by former recruiters to obtain their ribbon.
Semper Fi,
Matt Brzycki
Sergeant (1975-1979)

Note: I also have the ribbons available. Sgt Grit


GUTLESS, WIMPY, LOW-LIFE...............................

In reference to Drew Wenzel's letter, it wasn't the Mothers that complained about Boot Camp it was the gutless, wimpy, low-life politicians who wanted to score votes from their districts by picking on the military. And who better to pick on but the best.....the Marine Corps. I sure 99% of the Mothers were glad Boot Camp is the way it is/was as most of us "kids" who went in were a bit of trouble makers and they were amazed at the results!
  Semper Fi
  Mike Cipo 68-71 / 87-90


MCL AND CORPSMAN.............................................

The current Survey question is about this issue.
Vote at http://www.grunt.com/SURVEY.HTM

Sgt. Grit,
   I agree with the sentiment in the newsletter that the marine who quit the Marine Corps League because of FMF Corpsman being allowed to be members must not have been a combat Marine.  I spent more than 7 years of my Navy career as an FMF Corpsman attached to the Marines.  I felt very honored to be allowed to join the League.  The fact that I am still here after serving with Delta 1/5 during Tet is living proof of good the Marines are.  I have never been treated badly by any combat Marine.  The
only difference with my EGA tattoo is that it says "Doc"
Semper Fi
Ed (Doc) McDonnell
..........

Sgt. Grit,
In response to Doc Lerp, Navy Corpsman can go Marine Regs and wear Marine uniforms but not the Marine emblem.  They wear their service emblem and rank insignia.  As a 21 year Marine infantryman I can promise you that any fleet corpsman RATES to join the MC League in my book.  They are brothers in arms, and are welcome in our clubhouses, but they cannot wear our sacred
emblem.
Semper Fi,
GySgt Bandy
'80-'01
..........

to doc lerp, if it weren't for guys like you I would me one dead marine. thank you. you are welcome at my house anytime. rusty.
..........

This input for "Doc Lerp", hold your head high Doc. You earned the right to the EG&A as much as I did even if you never went to "our" private summer camp. I have fought numerous times against other "Marines" and sailors who cut down our unit corpsman. One of your own saved my life about 3 clicks outside Bien Hoa in '69 and I can never say thank you enough.  Any idiot who would cut down a corpsman that way, must never have been in a combat zone. And for those of you who have never "been there", don't forget who maintains your shot card. I saw a MSgt. once forget that and was a very sore Marine after having to get all his shots over again.
SSgt. Moore, John C. '67-'77 2389599
RVN Class of 69-70
..........

I don't know of too many Marines that don't have a great deal of respect, admiration and general gratitude toward any Navy Corpsman serving with Marine units during Viet Nam or any other conflict since.  Those young men fought along-side, bled-with and sometimes died-with Marines in battle.  Those Corpsmen bled Marine blood and cried Marine tears and they sweat Marine sweat when humping the boonies.  They were, and are Marines in their hearts.  When a Marine fell on the battlefield there was always a Corpsman nearby to render aid.  Do they deserve to wear the EGA ?  D*mn Right They Do!!!!  They will kick a** along side a Marine in a fight then patch him up after its over.  God Bless the Corpsmen!!!
R. Little, Sgt. USMC 61-68
RVN 66-67
..........

... here's two personal experiences to back it up. I was with
Recruit Field Training Division at Pendleton back in '83. One night on a hump up the side of Mount Motherf**ker I was in the back of the column with the series Gunny picking up stragglers when I heard "Corpsman up" from the head of the line .So naturally I took off double timing up the hill to see what the problem was.  As I ran pass a struggling recruit with a D.I. all over him I heard the D.I. yell at the recruit "Look at that, you want to be a Marine, you can't even walk up this hill and a sailor just ran past you" Later on the D.I. came up to me and said "Hey Doc, I didn't mean anything calling you a sailor, I was just trying to get that recruit moving" I assured him that no harm was done, and he replied "Good, I didn't want you pissed off at me" Just recently I was in a restaurant with my wife when a toddler went by with an middle aged guy in full pursuit. He had a ball cap with the 3rd Div. emblem on it so I asked where he got it. He said " where you in the Corps?" and I told him I was an ex-FMF Corpsman. He turned to my wife and said "Navy corpsmen are great, one saved my a** in Vietnam, I don't know what we would have done without them. Naturally I swelled up like a puffer fish from praise like that. So I say I'm not going to let the opinion of one idiot change my view. FMF Doc's belong to the Marine Corps weather he likes it or not.
Tom Lunsford
..........

Just want to echo "Doc" Lerp's assessment of the Marine who resigned from his Marine Corps League unit. Sure, we didn't do the whole route @ P.I. or "Dago" and we never raised our hands with the promise "to support and defend" with the intent of being a Marine...but when our orders came to The FMF, we gave up being sailors and took up the Marine uniform and our brothers were Marines, in all situations.  I am pleased to say that the Marines in our local MCL actively recruit us "Docs", cuz they sure knew it wasn't their mommas who bandaged them up when they were wounded, and they...the "Snuffy Grunt" type Marines, call us Marines too, cuz we shared all the good and the bad that they did, whether it be in Nam or wherever, and coming from those who have been there, done that, and designed the t-shirt, is enough!  I was even hired for my first job out of college, sight unseen, by a WWII Marine, patched up on Guadalcanal by a FMF Corpsman, for the simple reason "that you were a FMF Corpsman, and that makes you a Marine in my eyes, and good enough for anything the
civilian world can toss your way", his words! As a rifleman, he trusted me with a M-1 doing our job the same as he trusted a P.I. trained Marine who was my partner.
Semper Fi and God bless the Corps!
"Doc" Wells
...........


FORMER VS. EX..................................................

Regarding the dialog on former Marines versus ex-Marines I would like to proffer my opinion on the definition of these two terms.  A former Marine is one who served with Honor, Integrity, Courage, and Commitment as taught and demonstrated by all of Honorable Marines that went before us in battle and in peace.  An ex-Marine is someone who after earning the title "Marine" chose to dishonor the title by committing a reprehensible crime such as theft, murder, or rape or other acts of dishonesty i.e. lying about one's service record.  These dishonorable acts cause the loss of the title "U.S. Marine" and removes that individual from our ranks.  So there are, by my definition, ex- Marines.  Not to be confused with or related to my many compatriots of "former Marines" all of whom are honorable Marines.  Thank you all for being there for America when she needed you and a special thank you to the Marines of today who are doing their job when needed.
Semper Fi
Dwaine "Spike" Goodwin (60-64)
1955382


A LITTLE SOMETHING FOR VETERANS DAY..........

The Veteran

(The following 'statement of mission and purpose' was found on a flyer in a VA Medical Clinic in Los Angeles,
California.)
(Quote)

Always remember. The most important person ever in
this facility is the veteran.

The veterans are not interrupting your work... They are
the purpose of it.

The veterans are not just cold statistics... They are
flesh and blood human beings with feelings like your
own.

The veterans are not asking for favors... They are
seeking services which you were hired to render to
them and to which they are entitled under the law.

The veterans are not just casual passers-by... They
are citizens of the community upon whom rests the
decision as to whether this office and your job are
essential or useless.

Remember that the only real difference between you
and the veteran is but three feet of desk space. Can
you then afford to be other than courteous, respectful,
pleasant, and efficient?

"Author unknown"
Submitted by: Dan Hubble


FIND YOUR BUDDIES.......................................

HI MY NAME IS SANDY MILLER. MY HUSBAND RALPH MILLER WAS IN THE MARINES AND HE SURE IS PROUD TO BE A MARINE . HE  HAD WANTED TO
GET IN THE RESERVES  BUT WE  GOT MARRIED AND HE NEVER TRIED TO GET INTO THE RESERVES UNTIL I THINK HE'S EARLY 40'S.AND THEN IT WAS TO LATE, I GUESS U WOULD SAY TO OLD THEN. ANY WAY HE HAD THIS BEST BUDDY IN NAM. AND HE ALWAYS TALKED ABOUT HIM THROUGH THE YEARS. HIS NAME IS (CHARLES COTTON.) ANYWAY I TRIED TO FIND HIM YEARS AGO FOR A SURPRISE BIRTHDAY CALL FOR MY HUSBAND.  I CALLED ALL OVER  GEORGIA AND I NEVER COULD FIND HIM. MY HUSBAND IS NOW 52 YEARS OLD.  IT HAS BEEN 33 YEARS SINCE HE HAS SEEN THIS GUY.  OUR SONS GIRLFRIEND GOT ON LINE ONE DAY AND WAS  LOOKING UP HIS NAME AND FOUND SOME COTTONS WELL MY HUSBAND CALLED THE VERY FIRST ONE AND IT WAS COTTON. WE GOT TO GO VISIT HIM THIS SUMMER AND TALKING ABOUT A VERY EMOTIONAL MEETING IT WAS. THE FIRST TIME THEY TALKED ON THE PHONE THEY CRIED ALMOST THE WHOLE TIME .THEY COULDN'T TALK FROM CRYING.  I JUST WANTED TO WRITE THIS TO WHOEVER WANTS TO READ THIS. TO ME THIS IS VERY SPECIAL. BECAUSE U HARDLY EVER HEAR OF
MANY MEN MEETING THERE BEST BUDDY WHO  WAS IN SERVICE WITH EACH OTHER  THAT LONG AGO AND FINDING EACH OTHER AGAIN. I HAD NEVER MET THESE PEOPLE BEFORE AND WHEN WE WENT DOWN TO SEE THEM THEY TREATED US LIKE FAMILY.  SO THIS SPRING THEY ARE COMING TO WV. TO SEE US.  THEY LIVE IN GEORGIA  MY HUSBAND NOW IS DISABLED. HE HAS BLACK LUNG. HE HAS WORKED HARD ALL HIS LIFE.  AND NOW HE CANT HARDLY DO ANYTHING WITHOUT GETTING OUT OF BREATH. I AM JUST SO HAPPY THAT WE FOUND HIS BEST BUDDY.
THANK U SANDY

Note: Find your buddies, do it now. NOW!!!
      See the below page for help. Now...no excuses, NOW!!
      http://www.grunt.com/BUDSEARCH.HTM
      If you don't want to do it for yourself, do it for
      your buddy, he/they want to see.
      Sgt Grit.....I mean it...NOW!!


STANDING AT HIS POST................................................

Dear Sgt. Grit,
This is from Reader's Digest.

SERVING WITH THE MARINE CORPS in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Storm, my husband, Darren, was selected for guard duty.  One day he discovered that certain stories about the Corps had been circulating among our allies. While standing at his post, he noticed that the Saudi on duty with him was watching him out of the corner of his eye. Every time Darren looked over, the
Saudi would glance away. Finally the soldier nervously asked, "Have you ever killed a member of your own family?" Taken aback, Darren laughingly replied, "No." "Well, then," questioned the Saudi, "how did you get into the Marine Corps?"  -- Contributed to "Humor In Uniform" by Catherine Smith
  Submitted by: mstankovich


IT BECAME MORE OBVIOUS.................................................

Sgt. Grit,
I am the mother of a RECRUIT who is currently training in Parris Island.  He's been gone for 12 weeks and although it's very difficult having him away from home, I can already see what a positive experience he has had in his journey to become a "MARINE."  He made the decision that this was what he wanted as he was about to enter his senior year in high school.  I was surprised, but supported him 100%.  I am the daughter of a WWII and Korean war vet, but my son never had the chance to get to know my Dad so I wasn't sure where the influence came from.  Once I met his recruiter it became more obvious.  Now that I've read your newsletter several times, it has confirmed that this was the right decision for him.  He wants so much to have the opportunity to be called a MARINE and to serve his country.  He's finishing up the crucible today so I guess he's almost there!!!  I just want to say thanks for this newsletter.  It's a great vehicle for all.  It has helped me understand a little more about what being a MARINE really means and I can't tell you how proud I am to have my son join you all!  Mother of soon to be Marine, A R Ingram, Plt. 1090, 1st BN, Delta Company


AMERICAN BUGLER...................................................

Good Morning
       American Bugler is a non profit organization that is dedicated to preserving the tradition of live "Taps" for veterans when they pass. We also are involved in community outreach programs that promote education and patriotism. Please visit our site.  We would like to ask that you include us on your links page so we may reach people that have not yet heard of us.  Thank you for your consideration.
Semper Fi,
John Visci
Executive Director
American Bugler
  www.jvisci@AmericanBugler.net
  www.AmericanBugler.org     and    www.AmericanBugler.net



ELLIOT'S BEACH MARCH.......................................

HEY SARGE ,
I WAS JUST TALKING TO A FELLOW MARINE ABOUT THE ELLIOT'S BEACH MARCH . I WAS IN PLT.184 ( DEC.15,59-TO MAR.17,60 ). WE DID THE MARCH IN FEBRUARY. WE LEFT MAIN SIDE AND DID OUR THING ( TEMPERATURE WAS LOW 70'S ).OUR SENIOR D.I. WAS S/SGT. R.WATSON , WHO WAS AT THE FROZEN CHOSIN . THAT NIGHT THE TEMP DROPPED TO THE 20'S . OUR UTILITIES AND GEAR WAS FROZEN . WE WHERE ORDERED TO COME BACK TO MAIN SIDE , IT WAS 2 A.M.. THEY WHERE SENDING TRUCKS OUT TO BRING US BACK . I HEARD THE SARGE SCREAM " BS " WHERE GOING BACK AS MARINES . YUP , BACK INTO THE SWAMP.DAMMED IF IT DIDN'T FEEL GOOD . THE WATER WAS A H*LL OF A LOT WARMER THAN THE AIR TEMP. WE HIT MAIN SIDE JUST BEFORE REVEILLE . WE SANG OUR HYMN AS WE PASSED THE GENERALS QUARTERS, HEELS
POUNDING THE DECK, CHESTS OUT, HEART POUNDING WITH PRIDE ,AND WOKE UP THE WHOLE 1 ST. BATTALION . THEY KNEW 184 WAS BACK . WE WHERE  TOLD WE WHERE THE ONLY PLATOON TO DO THAT . IT WAS TOUGH , BUT ONE OF THE PROUDEST DAYS OF MY LIFE . WE DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT HYPOTHERMIA , AND NO ONE GOT IT . THAT NIGHT S/SGT. R. WATSON MADE US MARINES . WE KNEW WHAT BEING A MARINE MEANT !  WHEN WE GOT TO OUR SQUAD BAY HE GAVE US 15 MINUTES TO CLEAN UP ,AND FALL OUT FOR P.T. HE SAID THE CORP DOESN'T GIVE DAYS OFF  BECAUSE YOU HAD A TOUGH NIGHT !  I'LL NEVER FORGET THAT MAN ,HE EXEMPLIFIES OUR BELOVED CORP.
THANKS SARGE FOR WHAT YOU DID FOR ME ,AND THE MEN OF OUR PLATOON .

L/CPL. T.KANE ( 59-63)


I PUSHED 8 PLATOONS...........................................

Sgt Grit, in response to Drew Wenzel's letter about the current Marine Corps Recruit Training, I have the following to say.  As a former DI at Parris Island (98-01) I would invite the lad to attend today.  No, it's not the same as it was 10, 20, or 30 years ago.  It's harder.  Physical training has increased over the last ten years by a total of 11 hours.  Academic training has increased over the last ten years by 16 hours.  Not only are our recruits still trained "hard,"  they also have more to learn.  We have to cram 10 pounds of stuff into a 5 pound bag.  This makes for worn out, highly disciplined recruits (not to mention the worn out DI's).  Yes, there have been changes put in place due to the indiscretions of a few lousy DI's.  That only makes the current DI's work harder and become more creative
when it comes to instilling discipline.  I pushed eight platoons during my tour, and I'd fight along side any Marine that I graduated.  They're that darn good.  I made sure of it.  They're different, sure.  But not any worse, maybe better than in "the old Corps," whatever that is.  God bless America, and long live the Marines.
SSgt John Pierce
1st Tank Bn, AT/TOW Plt


HOWEVER.......................................................

Sgt Grit
To all those who are concerned about the Discovery channel program about Marine boot camp... forget it.  I saw portions of the Discovery channel program, and it turned my stomach.  However...

I have been mentoring a young man for the past year.  In Aug, he joined the Corps.  He left for boot camp 9 Sep 02.  I had been in touch with his Senior Drill Instructor, and was invited to Parris Island to speak to the recruits.  With Great Pride, I returned to Parris Island almost 34 years to the day from when I graduated with Platoon 193.

I talked with the Senior quite a bit, and I watch the Senior
and both his juniors drill the troops for about 2 hours on the
main grinder.  What I saw out on that grinder was a far cry from what I saw on that  program.  The veins in the neck were ever present, the recruits, of course, couldn't do anything right...get back, do it faster, sharper, better, keep in step, the whole works.  That one afternoon restored my confidence in Marine Corps Boot Camp.  Because, if that is how they are handling the troops in public, I am more than sure, that each troop gets plenty of personal attention in private.

I am an avid Discovery channel fan, and I was sorely disappointed in that program, oh well, even Barry Bonds strikes out occasionally.

By the way, if you ever get the chance to talk to a platoon of
recruits... don't pass it up...it was a very rewarding experience.  Semper Fi
Jerry Cox
68-98


IF YOUR VEINS WERE NOT STANDING OUT.........

Dear Sgt. Grit,
Regarding the discovery channel view of boot camp:  My son graduated from MCRD San Diego over two months ago.  He told me if you veins were not standing out you were not talking loud enough!  He had no cushion as reported in  the last newsletter.  His martial arts were done on wood chips and not sand.  He laughs at the Army basic training show.  From his reports,  nothing was
any easier than when my brother was at MCRD San Diego in 1967.  My son says he could not imagine training any other way, and never complains about the tough treatment. I have a lot of respect for him and am very PROUD to be a Marine Mom.
Proud USMC Mom


UNKEMPT APPEARANCE??.........................................

A few weeks after boot camp ( SD 1958 ) I ran into a "dirt bag" at the bus station, commented on his utilities and unkempt appearance, sorry he said.  "We were on a field problem and I was notified of a death in the family, my skipper drove me here in his might mite to make the bus home. Leader ship requires knowledge and understanding; criticism only when required.  Good to see John Papietros letter; he and I were class mates in 58 at Memphis. The Corps gave us a great start on a successful life.
Semper fi,
Jim Brown, 1958-1968
..........

I just had to comment about the Privates looking like dirt bags.  So let me just say in the "in the old Corps days Circa 1953, I was a PFC transferred right out of Radio School to Camp 'Swampy and the 2nd MARDIV.  I rode the entire way by greyhound bus.  Now anyone who in those days who rode with Greyhound knew that there were no bathrooms on the bus, it did not stop for smoking breaks but did stop at every bus stop to discharge and pick up passengers.  Also, most of the bus stations had a detachment of Shore Patrol in the vicinity.  Now in the Old Corps, we were taught that you never went anywhere in uniform looking like a dirt bag.  Consequently, at every bus stop, I quickly got shaved, cleaned up and got a shoe shine.  In those days it took four to five days to go from coast to coast on the bus what with layovers and all.  I never ever recall seeing any Marine or Sailor or even Soldier looking like a dirt bag....Must be an aberration the two dirt bags in question.....But then, they probably do not ride the Greyhounds these days either.  By the way, when one reported in to their new duty station in those days, one always had a new haircut, shave, pressed and clean uniform....always, no exceptions.  So, what has happened since?
  Richard E. Nygaard  SSgt USMC 1953-1963.
..........


I INSTINCTIVELY REPLIED "YES SIR".............................

Semper Fi....
       With regards to the changing Marine Corps Boot Camp, I attended my Son's Graduation Ceremonies at MCRD, San Diego during the week of 4 July 2000.  It was an amazing event running 3 days and culminating in my Son's graduations ceremony that included a Marine Corps Marching Band, Flags, Bull Dog Mascot and thousands of parents and friends.

       31 years ago from that week, almost to the day, I was
standing on this same Parade Ground marching in a Graduation Ceremony that was less than an inspiration and certainly without the recognition of our hard earned accomplishments.  There were no Flags, there were very few parents and there certainly wasn't any Marching Band.  My son received an immediate 10 day leave while, in the past, we boarded buses for Camp Pendleton the
next morning.

       I happened upon one of  most squared away Gunnery Sergeant I have ever seen and traded amenities.  He asked me if I was a former Marine and I instinctively replied "Yes Sir"...  We chatted some and another question came to bear..."How do you think Boot Camp has changed in 31 years?"  All I could say was, "They were a little more 'Hands On" in my day."

       Afterwards, long discussions with my brand new "Grown Up" son made me realize the 'Changes are Forever"....  We could now communicate like never before.  Naturally, we discussed, in detail, "Boot Camp", more specifically "Modern Boot Camp"....

       Boot Camp for me in 1969 was the "S--- Storm" of my worst nightmares, but it became apparent my Son's Boot Camp was more physically demanding that anything I could have lived through.  Their 4 mile run "In Formation", on Visitor's Day would have left me somewhere near the perimeter of the Airport.
  Semper Fi
  Kenneth P. Zalga, Cpl.....  "69-70"


THIS IS WHY THERE ARE SGTMAJ'S...................................

Sgt Grit:  I believe former Sgt Russo's comments concerning Women Marines may stem from the fact that during his time there were separate chains of command for male and female Marines.  I came on the scene in 1968 and there were still WM Companies.  The females worked in integrated workplaces and had male supervisors, but all discipline and housekeeping chores were performed in WM company.  If I remember correctly, if a confrontation arose between male and female Marine, the female would generally either cry or tell the male to go to he**.  Neither of which he could do much about.  That situation didn't last much after 1968 and after 26 years of active duty I can truthfully say, I met d*mn few Marines of the female persuasion that I wasn't d*mn proud to serve with.  SgtMaj T.M. Schlechty USMC, Ret. 1968-1994 (2533/0848/9999)


THE GRUNT PADRE..........................................

Dear Sir,
I am reading a book called "The Grunt Padre" about Father Vincent Capodanno a Marine Corps Chaplain during the Vietnam War. I was wondering if it would be possible to ask our Marines to post their memories of this fine priest in your newsletter. I've read many accounts in this book so far as to how his compassion and kindness towards his beloved Marines touched their lives. Thank you.
Sincerely,
A. Seidita

http://www.grunt.com/catalog/links.asp?cat=5&page=3
#BK399,   $15.95


MARINE DOWN...................................................

Hey Sgt Grit:
One of our Nation's Hero's - Iwo Jima MOH recipient Jack Lucas underwent TRIPLE By-Pass surgery on Wednesday 23Oct in Hattiesburg, MS.  I am very happy to pass on that Jack is doing very well and may even go home in the
next couple of days.  Please keep Jack in your prayers - and if anyone would like to drop him a line - his address is as follows:

Mr Jack Lucas
75 Elks Lake Rd
Hattiesburg, MS 39401-8636

Semper Fidelis:
Mary Draughn


COULDN'T QUITE UNDERSTAND...................................

After watching the video "Enduring Freedom"
http://www.usmc.mil/videos/ef.asf I noticed that my wife, who has seen me at my best and my worst, through my proudest moments since we met, and has endured the countless nights of me bolting straight up in bed from the past, sat there sharing my pride. My stepson couldn't quite understand the tears that had welled up in my eyes and were streaming down my face... there was no way to explain them.  I pray that our young men and women, who are now, and in the future, are able to come home safe and soon. And that future generations never have to know the feeling of war.  God bless America.
Semper Fi~
"Road" 1980-1992


AL LERNER....................................

To all brother Marines, One of our brothers recently passed from this world.  Al Lerner was the owner of the Cleveland
Browns football team.  He knew that he was failing but
he fought his sickness till the end.  He passed from
this world on October 23, 2002.

    More can be read about Mr. Lerner at
http://www.clevelandlive.com.

    He always said that one of the most important days
in his life was when he became a Marine.  Because of
that, the Marine Corps flag flies in front of Cleveland Brown Stadium.  He will be missed, but he can truly say that he made a difference in this world.
Mark Sasak


JARHEADS NOT JUGHEADS..........................................

Sgt Grit;
     I see a lot of going back and forth with my fellow Marines on who is better and what was better, who won this battle and what battle was the worst.  It makes for a good bull sh*t session when it only concerns Marines who are involved in it, I myself have been involved in a few of them myself with other Marines from different MOS's then mine(0311 grunt).What does burn my *ss is when these Marines air their dirty laundry in public for the rest of the world to see.  In the public eye and in public if we want to be called Marines then we better start acting like Marines.  We are Jarheads not jugheads we are all brothers and sisters we are all a part of something that is uniquely ours.No other branch of the military can or ever will  have that.  Marines are a special