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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 01 OCT 2015

In this issue:
• Mid-Rats
• A Message From The Commandant
• 51 Years After

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I wanted to share with you and your readers a Quilt of my Grandson. He was in Boot Camp in San Diego and schooling in Florida. He is now at Camp Lejeune, NC.

Thank you for what you do!

Buddy and Barbara Cox


Honors My Dad

Sgt Grit,

My dad was born 8/11/1933. He served in the Korean war. He passed away 8/12/13 and is buried at Indiantown Gap, PA. Till the day he died, he never forgot he was a Marine. My mom, who is 79 and will be 80 in January, honors my dad and the Marines when she wears a Marine Corps shirt/sweatshirt when she goes walking two, three or four times a week. She walks 6 miles each time.

Mom and dad were always big walkers when my dad was alive.

I had ordered your catalog a few months back for mom to see. Tonight she was up the street visiting with some neighbors. Jim had worn his Marine Corps shirt. Mom told him about Sgt Grit. She came down to get it for him. He loved it and asked if he could borrow it. Mom told him to keep it. So I'm ordering mom another catalog.

Thank you for all you do. Semper Fi!

Tomi Duttry


A Good Day

On Sept 15, 2015 SgtMajor Beck (ret), L/Cpl O'donnell, Sgt David Simmons, myself Sgt Wears and MstSgt Knight (ret) [L to R in pic], met up on 1st Bn Parade Deck for our 50th anniversy of graduation from Parris Island. We looked over the parade deck, Stood in front of the Iwo jima memorial. We got a tour of the new barracks (second picture), SgtMajor Beck saw the yellow footprints I snapped to on them struck the red hand print as hard as I could, shouted who I was, got to request when the 3 now Drill Instructors came out of the Drill instructors house, wondering what was going on since they had not picked up their new Plt. Too funny.

A good day.

Michael Wears
Sgt of Marines


Mid-Rats

In response to Junior H.'s comments re: mid-rats, I was Sgt of the Guard Sept-Nov 1969, at the ASP, Camp Geiger. At 23:30 I made the rounds in my M151A1, delivering midnight rations to my charges. The brown paper bags consisted of a sandwich made with fresh white bread, a cold cut (Bologna or ham) and cheese, wrapped in wax paper, several packets of yellow mustard, and a fruit (banana or Apple). It wasn't meant to be a meal, just a midnight snack, to help alertness.

Ron Morse

Note: Ron I am sure that at Geiger this is an accurate description of freshness etc... I served with Junior and his description was charitable. We called them horse-c-ck and baby-sh-t sandwiches. The heat made the sandwiches and the chocolate milk warm by the time they got to the guard posts, FDC bunker etc...

Sgt Grit


51 Years After

Sgt Grit,

On 11 September, my nephew PFC Eric A. Nodland, graduated MCRD Parris Island. On hand to congratulate him was his immediate family plus two uncles. See the attached photo. As the uncle who is the Marine in the family I not only congratulated him, I welcomed him into our Corps, 51 years after I graduated.

Semper Fidelis,
Mike LaBozzetta
1964-1967


Camp Matthews

Jim,

Got a ride partway to Camp Matthews (had to get clear of the City of San Diego). Humped the rest of the way. Got a ride all the way back. All in cattle cars.

Jerry D.
Platoon 145 -- 28 June 1962 to 18 September 1962
4 yrs. 2 mos. 12 days. That's what it says on my DD-214.

"Close it up girls. Make the maggot in front of you smile."

"Private if I see you do that again, I'm going to unscrew your head and sh-t down your neck."
S/Sgt Way July of 1962

Semper Fi
Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Jerry D.


A-10 Warthogs

I'd like to bring this up for discussion. The Air Force has been trying for years to retire the A-10. Congress, because they keep hearing from the guys on the ground, keeps holding them off on that. Now the Air Force has been trying to unload them on the Army but the Army (or at least the Secretary thereof has said, "NO!") My question is why The Corps never developed an interest in the Warthog? It would seem that a dedicated close air support platform would be of more than just passing interest to the grunts on the ground. I know, someone will say that the A-10 can't land or take off from a carrier but then, neither could the OV-10 Bronco and it certainly had a long career for The Corps. So why wouldn't The Corps be interested?

Jerry Womack
CDR US Navy (ret'd)


A Message From The Commandant

24 Sep 2015

"All previous guidance remains in effect."

To all Marines, Sailors, civilians and families, I am honored to serve as your Commandant. To General and Mrs. Dunford, as you transition to your next assignment, please know that you go with the respect and thanks of every Marine, Sailor and their families. It is now our responsibility to maintain the institutional momentum of the past year in our efforts to sustain and continue to improve our Corps. That said, no later than the New Year I will publish a "FragO" to the current CPG.

"Like war itself, our approach to warfighting must evolve."

As the Nation's crisis response force and force in readiness, Marines remain forward deployed, ready to fight and win tonight. However, we cannot rest on our past successes and our current efforts because our nation's enemies are continuously adapting and challenging us with new and different forms of warfare. We must continue to improve our readiness for today's fight, while at the same time ensuring we remain relevant for the conflicts we know will come in the future. As Marines have always done, we will continue to seek new opportunities and develop solutions that maintain an overwhelming tactical advantage over any adversary. We must know how we will operationally apply our capabilities against our adversaries, but also study and be aware of how they will apply their capabilities against us.

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack."

Our strength is the talent, skill and discipline of our Marines and Sailors. Today, we are a ready and capable Corps of Marines because of patriotic Americans who are willing to step forward and accept the challenge of being a Marine in order to serve our Nation. Since our friendly center of gravity is our "Team of Marines," it is appropriate to begin our tenure by communicating clear expectations for leaders and those they serve.

"The senior is obligated to provide the guidance and the example that allows subordinates to exercise proper judgment and initiative."

This includes providing a clear mission and intent... What to do, not how to do it. What Marines should expect from leaders:

- Firm but fair leadership. Marines and Sailors will betreated with dignity and respect.
- Accountability. All Marines will be held to the highest standards of conduct and performance.
- Leadership from the front. Leaders will set the highest examples in their professional and personal life.
- Realistic and challenging training. We will train hard in every clime and place, day and night.
- Weapons and equipment that is on the cutting edge of technology. Marines must quickly recognize and leverage technology to make us better warfighters.
- Opportunities for advancement. All Marines will be recognized for a high level of performance.
- Care and support for families and our wounded. Both are critical members of the Marine Corps team and have earned our support.
- Honesty, Integrity, and Loyalty. Trust is a two-way street. Listen to and take care of Marines in your charge and they will take care of you.
- Compassion. All leaders will provide those in their charge sincere and concerned assistance with problems.

"The subordinate agrees to act (with discipline, respect and loyalty) and not exceed the proper limits of authority."

What leaders should expect from Marines:

- Always give 100% to the mission. Bring your "A" game every day.
- Be technically and tactically proficient. Learn, study, read... know your profession.
- Be physically, morally, and mentally fit. Lead a healthy and disciplined life style. Condition your mind and body for the rigors of combat. Use of illegal drugs and abuse of legal drugs and alcohol are not conducive to this goal.
- Be accountable for your actions. If you make a mistake, admit it, correct it, and press on.
- Care for and maintain your weapons and equipment. Readiness depends on it.
- Overcome adversity and exercise initiative. Seek solutions and never run away from problems.
- Tell the truth - ALWAYS! Bad news does not get better with time. Things cannot be fixed if they are not talked about.
- Set goals and then strive to achieve them. Have a plan for your life whether you serve 4 or 40 years.
- Earn trust in all things, every day. Be loyal to your unit, your peers, your subordinates, and your leaders.

"Human will, instilled through leadership, is the driving force of all action in war."

Being a Marine is not a job but a way of life. Give your all to be the best human being, teammate and Marine or Sailor possible. The end result will be an unbeatable force ready to take on any mission, any place, and any time. When we do execute our missions and our lives in this way, we will take our proper place alongside the long line of Marines and Sailors who have preceded us. Let's go!

Semper Fidelis,

Robert B. Neller
General, U.S. Marine Corps
Commandant of the Marine Corps


Military Fakers Are Everyone's Business

Sgt Grit,

Yesterday the wife and I were out running a few errands and we stopped at a local ACE hardware store. I was looking for someone to answer a question I had about wood stain and I approached an employee not knowing that he was helping another customer. The other customer walked around the corner and when I saw him I apologized for jumping ahead of him. He said nothing, but looked at my shirt. I was wearing a red Marine tee-shirt and he stared at the shirt and then turned away. It was then that I noticed he was wearing a white, long-sleeved shirt with an embroidered patch on the front left pocket that said "army veteran" with another patch on the other pocket that I could not make out, but it looked like a unit patch. I said, "thank you for your service", but he just ignored me and turned away. When he did, I noticed that the six of his shirt had a huge "FORMER POW/VIET NAM VET" embroidered patch on it, so now I'm really impressed and want to shake his hand and make sure he heard my thank you.

I passed him again going down the tool aisle and he turned away from me, obviously in an attempt to avoid making eye-contact with me. At this point I got a clear view of his face before he turned away and he was at least ten years younger than me (I am 53) and it was then that I noticed that the shirt was really rumpled and his jeans were three sizes too large. There is no way that this guy was a military veteran dressed as sloppily as he was with zero military bearing, but worse than that he was way too young to have been a Viet Nam vet and or a POW. I stood there for a second thinking about how I should react when my wife asked me what was wrong. I told her that the guy was a phony and she replied that he did look odd. Her own brother is a Viet Nam vet and she thought a second and then said, "yes, that guy is way too young, there is no way he is a Viet Nam vet. Don't you dare say anything to him, these people will think you are a stalker." Then she said, "Do you think he is trying to get a discount?" It was then that I realized that this was probably his game plan.

He had been in the tool aisle and the store employee was opening the case for him where the more expensive power tools were kept, so I deduced that this was probably his plan, but after I approached him the second time he quietly walked out of the store. I guess my presence unnerved him or maybe he thought I was going to approach him again and either ask him questions or blow his cover. By the time we checked out he was long gone, so I never got to see what vehicle he drove, but my guess is that it was adorned with military stickers. I can't begin to tell you how pissed I get when I confront this sort of cr-p, but my wife tells me that I need to mind my own business. In my opinion, military fakers are everyone's business. Just thought I would share this story.

Semper Fi,
Mike Kunkel
Cpl 0331
Lima 3/8 Weapons Plt
1981-1985


1967 Newsreel Broadcast "Con Thien"

Vietnam Special

This commercial news broadcast explores the Con Thien Battle of the Vietnam War, discussing the location's strategic importance.


Short Rounds

With the centennial celebrations of MCRD Parris Island starting this month, we thought it would only be fitting to request boot camp stories and memories to be sent in by our PI Marines. So go ahead and sound off about your PI experiences by sending them to info[at]grunt.com.

Sgt Grit


"Flip Flop, Hippety Hop, Mob Stop!"

"You people are not a mob, you're a herd. A mob has a leader!"

Semper Fi,
D. McKee '59-'63
MCRDSD Plt. 271


Very old Marine [84] needs some answers.

I arrived at P.I. on March 17th, 1951. I was assigned to Plt.216, it was assigned to 5th RC trng. Battalion. We were opposite the Triangle PX and lived in 6-man tents.

Would like any information regarding this area. Thank you for your help on this matter.

Semper Fi!

Sgt. Joe Layton 1188---


I never recived my Boot Camp graduation year book... would like to know how I can get a copy.

I was in Plt 387, I Co., 3rd Battalion. Graduated in 10 Aug 1972. If there is anyone out there that can help me I would greatly appreciate it.

Semper Fi
S. Cloutier
PVT U.S.M.C.


GySgt John Basilone Parade - September 20, 2015


Quotes

"Marines die; that's what we're here for. But the Marine Corps lives forever. And that means YOU live forever."
--The role of GySgt. Hartman, USMC; portrayed by GySgt. R. Lee Ermey [1987]


"The goal of 'the rule of law and not of men' has increasingly been abandoned in favor of government picking winners and losers."
--Thomas Sowell, Author and Economist, USMC, Korea


"Do good and avoid evil."
--Thomas Aquinas


"Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves."
--Ronald Reagan, The New York Times [April 13, 1980]


"We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth — and listen to the song of that syren, till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those, who having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation?"
--Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Convention, 1775


"You'll never get a Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!"
--Capt. Henry P. Crowe, USMC; Guadalcanal, 13 January 1943


"My Rifle is my Weapon, My Rifle is my Life, and when I go to sleep at night my Rifle is my Wife!"

"You little maggot, I'm gonna screw your head off and sh-t in the hole!"

"YOU! YOU! Do I look like a female sheep boy!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

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