Sgt. Grit Community

Marine Corps Mustang Association 2018 Reunion and Muster

Reunion Notice

Marine Corps Mustang Association (MCMA), 32nd Reunion and Muster, August 08-12, 2018. Menger Hotel, San Antonio, TX. Contact: Lt Col Richard J. Sullivan, USMC (Ret.) (508) 954-2262, sul824@verizon.net. Detailed reunion event information can be found at the MCMA Website, marinecorpsmustang.org.

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Amazing sights and sounds of war

March 28, 1970, Golf Co., 2/5 was on a difficult hump through the rice paddies back to An Hoa Base for three days of rest and showers. This time of year in Viet Nam the heat is “awful damn hot” and grunts were starting to feel the stress from the heat and mud and smell of the water in the rice paddies. We had been moving for a couple of hours when Cpt. Darling stop the company. In front of us was this large green mountain and word started being pass along to watch that beast. We stood there in that water for few minutes when suddenly the side of that mountain blew up. My friends, have you ever witness a B-52 air strike? The mountain was a deep green one second and then a massive cloud of dirt thrown into the air and when everything settled back down—nothing! Just one very large spot of rock was all that was left. We hear the explosion what seem like five minutes later. The word was pass through the radio that the air strike had been called on a VC/NVA rest and relaxation camp. Man! Their rest and relaxation was going to be long time. There was no need for a burial detail for anyone. I tell ya, that sight gave us something else to think about for the rest of that hump.

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The day it rained trees.

The day it rained trees.
The 3rd.Platoon of Golf Co. 2/5 was placed on Hill 34 (a pile of dirt next to the road) for road security. The
story about the 81-M Mortar Team that got their guns turned around in the wrong
direction during a fire mission and blew away a village was being pass around.
The Platoon Lt. ask me about my MOS of 0341 and if I could call in a fire
mission. It had been two years since my training at Camp Geiger but I stated
that I felt pretty sure of my skills (I mean—I am a Marine after all!). Well,
there was a 81-M team at our position and the Lt. challenged me to order a fire
mission on a ridge line that he spotted. I found the position on the map, give
them to the mortar team and order one H.E.round for adjustment. I didn’t have to
adjust anything. The round hit dead center on the spot the Lt. was looking at (I mean— it’s a sad dog that won’t wag his own tail) .
And then showed him that I knew how to move the rounds right-left, up-down, and
“walk them in”. The Lt. informed me that I would be his backup for F.O. if it
became necessary. I wasn’t all that grateful for this opportunity to be a
Forward Observer. I shared this experience for three reasons: 1. This Platoon
Lt. didn’t trust the men in his platoon to know their jobs and do them—there
for my challenge. 2. His radioman was a big kiss-ass (to get rank) and would
tell the Lt. anything on the men in order to look good, whether they were true
or not. 3. The reason the Lt took me a long with him on this walk.

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TET 68′

I was not there at the start of TET,I was still home on leave at the time getting ready to fly out for pre-deployment training.I was notified a couple days after that two of my friends from High School were killed on the first day.Both were draftees and in the Army. One was killed at Pleiku and the other some where farther south near Saigon.The reason I bring this up is the fact that my Mom went ballistic on me wanting me to go UA .My Dad just said “See what you have waiting for you!!” He always knew the war in Nam was BS I did’nt If I only knew then what I know now I would have made a different choiceWe were lied to about Vietnam Exposed to Agent Orange, I have two conditions associated to “The Orange” Lung Cancer being one.Quit smoking in 1970 Also diagnosed withPTSD in 1987 had it forever just did’nt know it Oh forgot to mention the cloroacne on my chest,back and groin after returning home in 69′ If I knew then what I Know now I would have never volunteered but, under the same conditions I would do the same thing I am proud of my service in the Marines! I just wish it would have been another place another time E 2/1 4 Mar 68- 22 Mar 69

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Master Sgt. Catherine G. Murray, first female Marine to retire from active service, laid to rest

Master Sgt. Catherine G. Murray, the first enlisted female Marine to retire from the Marine Corps, was laid to rest Tuesday in Arlington National Cemetery.

Murray, born in 1917, first served in motor transport during World War II and remained in active service until her retirement in 1962. She said hearing then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1941 radio broadcast announcing the attack on Pearl Harbor was a pivotal moment in her life.

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#MARINE OF THE WEEK // SHOT IN NECK, KEEPS FIGHTING:

#MARINE OF THE WEEK // SHOT IN NECK, KEEPS FIGHTING:

Lance Cpl. Cody Goebel
3rd Battalion, 5th Marines
Sangin, Afghanistan, Nov. 22, 2010
Award: Silver Star

While in Afghanistan’s Helmand province, Lance Cpl. Goebel was manning a security position in the southern Green Zone of Sangin District when he was struck in the neck by enemy small arms fire. Knocked to the ground and severely wounded at his post, he quickly picked himself up, remounted his machine gun, and engaged the enemy’s firing position with full knowledge that his position was critical to his squad’s defense. For seven minutes, he ignored his life threatening wounds and delivered devastating machine gun fire on the enemy’s position, all while refusing medical attention until he was properly relieved. Finally, but only after a fellow squad member had manned his machine gun, Goebel moved 25 meters under his own power and under heavy fire across the observation post’s roof and down a 20-foot ladder to the casualty collection point. Upon reaching the ground, he collapsed due to the loss of blood and had to be carried to a helicopter landing zone for subsequent medical evacuation. His courage, heroism, and dedication to duty after sustaining a life threatening injury resulted in the successful blocking of an enemy attack and six enemy fighters killed. (U.S. Marines photos by Sgt. Timothy Lenzo)

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MARINE CORPS SEARCHES FOR NEW SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM

Giving Marine Commanders the means to communicate beyond line of sight while forward deployed is a critical and necessary capability. A Marine Corps Systems Command-led working group is actively pursuing updates to the Very Small Aperture Terminal Family of Systems, which has been deployed for nearly a decade. The mission: to develop and deliver an updated, cost-effective, reliable solution.

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A different kind of weapon used by the VC/NVA

Let me start by saying that if I get this information wrong, please feel free to explain what I’m trying to describe . I can assure you my friends, my feelings will not be hurt.

As it was told to me, the VC/NVA would collect the 250 lb. bombs that didn’t go off when they hit. They would tie this bomb on a small tree, pull it back, and place a small explosive charge under the tree. When the smaller explosive went off, it would cause the small tree to spring forward with more tension and consequently forcing the bomb in to the air with some power. We would hear the smaller explosion and the bomb cutting through the air. I’m not sure how to spell the sound it would make but if one was ever thrown at you, you know what I mean when I say “cutting through the air”. The worst of it all, you didn’t know what to do (‘to sh– or get’)! Anything that big doesn’t have to land on top of you to “put your health records in to the red”. The upside to all of this, believe it or not, is that the bomb still had to hit on it’s head in order to detonate. Still, I don’t know too many guys who didn’t need to go to the head after going through something like that.

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