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Study: Ecstasy Treats PTSD

 
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<H1>Study: Ecstasy Treats PTSD</H1>
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<DIV class=article_pub_date>July 16, 2010</DIV><SPAN id=article_source>Military.com</SPAN><SPAN class=divider>|</SPAN><SPAN class=article_byline>by Bryant Jordan</SPAN>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>The drug Ecstasy shows positive results in the majority of patients when used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a report coming out Monday in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>The study, which focuses on 20 patients for whom previous drug and psychotherapy treatments were unsuccessful, is the first of its kind and a stepping stone for a follow-up that will focus entirely on U.S. military veterans, said Rick Doblin, who founded the <FONT color=#0000f0>Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies</FONT> - a group that analyzes the use of psychedelic drugs in mental health treatment.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“We want most of the veterans [in the next study] to come from Iraq and Afghanistan,” Doblin told Military.com in an exclusive interview July 15. “But we want some Vietnam veterans as well because we want to see if we can help people who have had these [PTSD] patterns for decades.” </DIV>
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 </DIV>The current study group was mostly female victims of child sexual abuse and rape who suffered from PTSD for an average of about 19 years, said Dr. Michael Mithoefer, a South Carolina psychiatrist who oversaw the testing. </DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>When the association got initial approval for its study from the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, the U.S. was not engaged in Afghanistan and Iraq, so the application specifically asked to test victims of crime. The same application went to the Drug Enforcement Agency, which only approved it in 2004.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>The study was completed in late 2008 and <FONT color=#800080>Military.com first reported on the positive findings in March 2009</FONT>. The study’s publication in the British <FONT color=#0000f0>Journal of Psychopharmacology</FONT> marks the end of nearly 10 years of paperwork and bureaucratic delays, as well as the research itself. The study will be available for free download starting Monday at <FONT color=#0000f0>http://jop.sagepub.com/pap.dtl</FONT>.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>In the study, 12 of the 20 registered patients were treated with a combination of MDMA and psychotherapy; the other eight were given a placebo and psychotherapy.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>According to Mithoefer, 10 of the patients in the MDMA trial group saw clinically and statistically significant improvements in their PTSD, compared to just two of the eight people in the control group.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>Those in the trial group who responded well to the MDMA treatments “no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD,” according to Mithoefer. This included three patients who reported prior to the treatments that they were unable to work. But after the treatments, they returned to the job.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>The study also found no evidence patents who took the Ecstasy experienced any ill effects from the drug, Mithoefer said.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>While the current study focused on women who were not exposed to combat, Mithoefer said the largest symptom groups [of PTSD] are the same regardless of the cause.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“But you can have differences,” he said. </DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“As far as we know, the present research suggests the same basic approach works for people with any kind of PTSD, but there are some obvious important differences,” he explained. “It is always individualized, so working with veterans is going to have some different qualities than, say, working with people with childhood sexual abuse. . The veterans experience does have some particular aspects to it that are different from other trauma and that has to be taken into account.”</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>Doblin established the Psychedelic Studies Association in the mid-1980s, just as MDMA was being criminalized in the United States and the pressure was on nationally and internationally to halt research into the use of psychedelics for medical purposes. Once possession or use of MDMA became a criminal violation, Doblin realized the only way to work with it would be to go through the FDA.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>Although the DEA remains a tough sell in terms of supporting the use of an illegal drug as part of a therapy regimen, Doblin has the approvals from the FDA and has the follow-on project approved by an independent institutional review board - a requirement when doing a human research study.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>Meanwhile, MAPS already has been getting queries from veterans interested in taking part.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>For Doblin, working to help combat veterans brings him along an unorthodox path back to how he got involved in studying psychedelics for medical and mental health uses.</DIV>
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 </DIV>Coming of age in the 1960s, he was not a pacifist but he opposed the Vietnam War and said he was prepared to go to jail rather than serve in it or flee to Canada. At 18, he didn’t even bother to register and kept waiting to be arrested; the reality was, he said, that tens of thousands of men didn’t bother to register and the government never came after them.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>He began to wonder how he could contribute to creating an alternative to war, he said, and began studying about how people were motivated to fight and how others were used - “scapegoated” - to legitimatize war.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“When I first tried LSD, it was very powerful,” he recalled. It gave him a sense of the connectedness of everything, he said, and he came to believe that “if people understood how connected they are, that they’re part of the human family, and that goes deeper than country, race, religion, gender and class - if they had a sense of that, it would be harder to kill.”</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>Now Doblin is frustrated by federal agencies (such as the DEA) that delay testing drugs that could help veterans dealing with the psychological wounds of combat.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“They’re putting the drug war over the health of the veterans,” he said. Officials argue that you don’t give drugs to people who have a high incidence of drug abuse, he said, but the reason they abuse drugs is because of the PTSD, and if you can treat that they have less reason for doing drugs at all.</DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“And it’s not about giving it to them for the rest of their lives,” he said, “but two or three times in a controlled setting with a therapist present.” </DIV>
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<DIV style=“MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt”>“That’s the profound power of MDMA when used in a therapeutic setting,” he added.</DIV></DIV>
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Ecstasy treats PTSD. Yep. So does Jack Daniels. Zoloft. Trazadone. Risperidone. Marijuana. LSD. Heroin. If they are gonna make a case for Ecstasy, they can make a case for just about anything. It f*cks you up, ergo, it helps your PTSD. I actually recommend Dewars Scotch on the rocks with an occasional boost of Mezcal, combined with loud rock music. Worked for me.
In all seriousness, these asshats need to start thinking about therapy rather than dope. 

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Big AL, I think you missed the punch line where it says <FONT style=“BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ccffff”>two of three times</FONT> in a controlled setting with a therapist PRESENT. 

[co][8-|]

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[quote user=“devildog-64012”]
Big AL, I think you missed the punch line where it says <FONT style=“BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ccffff”>two of three times</FONT> in a controlled setting with a therapist PRESENT. 

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I didn’t miss it. In fact, I’ve read this article before. I still think it’s bullsh*t quack-job psychiatry. There was another study that came out a few months before this one that said marijuana helps PTSD. My point is, just about anything that makes you high feels like it’s helping your PTSD. It’s a temporary thing…that’s why many combat vets have drug and alcohol problems…because they self-medicate. Ultimately, the drugs and alcohol only make PTSD worse because they are not healthy treatment.
So you do Ecstacy in a controlled environment with a therapist present and you think it helps. Well, guess what, if it helps you in a controlled environment you are going to believe that it will help you when you are NOT in a controlled environment. It’s just going to make you want to do it more. With headshrinks the answer is always medication. Dope is always the magic bullet.  
This guy, Rick Doblin, who’s pushing this idea is a freakin acid-head. “When I first tried LSD, it was very powerful…” No sh*t, Sherlock. I don’t want some drug-addled hippie bastard trying to help me with PTSD issues. I want COMBAT VETERAN COUNSELORS helping me with mine.

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[quote user=“Big Al”]
Ecstasy treats PTSD. Yep. So does Jack Daniels. Zoloft. Trazadone. Risperidone. Marijuana. LSD. Heroin. If they are gonna make a case for Ecstasy, they can make a case for just about anything. It f*cks you up, ergo, it helps your PTSD. I actually recommend Dewars Scotch on the rocks with an occasional boost of Mezcal, combined with loud rock music. Worked for me.
In all seriousness, these asshats need to start thinking about therapy rather than dope. 

 
 
..... and that in a nutshell is why I love you so much.
In all seriousness, I worked for the APA (American Psychiatric Association) when they were on K street in DC.  Biggest collection of loons I have ever had to deal with in my entire life.  I am convinced all of them choose psych to unscrew their own messed up lives.
Which reminds me of all the “concerned” shows on NPR about returning Vets offing themselves, or others, or being at high risk to off themselves, or others ... which infuriates the Studmuffin to no end ... that very idea that ANY combat vet is about to go OFF on ANYONE at anytime without notice ... and yet, he continues to listen to NPR ... I just change the channel.  :)

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And there it is.
Years ago I went into group therapy at the VA. The Headshrink talked to us like we were children. I couldn’t stand it. It was like being in the f*ckin second grade. Not only that, but the group was too big, about 20 people. Out of that 20 maybe 3 were legitimate combat vets, the others were former REMFs working claims. It was such a joke. After two sessions, I quit.
Then I found the Vet Center. I was fortunate enough to be assigned to a combat-vet counselor who had been seriously wounded. He put me in a group with 5 other infantry combat vets, three Army, two Marines, one was a combat medic, all had CIBs or CARs and four of us, if you include the counselor/group leader, were Purple Heart recipients. I stayed in the group two years and it was the best medicine I ever had. It literally salvaged my life, turned it around. 
That’s the kind of therapy combat vets need. The kind of therapy that utilizes and takes advantage of that strong, unique bond combat vets have with one another. That is the strongest base from which you could ever want to build upon, that brotherhood. Each combat vet has different war stories, but all share common ground…and the commonest ground is the feeling of alienation upon returning to the civilian world.  “These f*ckers will never understand, they will never get it. We are so different.”  That’s right. You can never expect your civilian friends to ever fully “get it.”     
War becomes a part of your being, your character. You are a warrior forever. You can’t change it, you can’t shut it out. You are going to remember every firefight, every traumatic episode, until the day you die. That’s fact. The mistake guys make is trying to bury it, trying to act like it never happened. It’ll eat you alive. But when you re-bond with other combat vets you realize you are not alone, you have an instant support base. Warriors are different. They will always be different from the softer civilian world. And instead of feeling like an outcast, a combat vet needs to realize he is a different kind of cat, on a higher plane.
It’s a good thing, not a bad thing.
But you will never discover that in sessions with civilian psychiatrist quacks who want to pump you full of respiradone and who are afraid—thanks to years of negative stereotyping by the media—that you’re going to go f*ckin psycho on them at any moment and climb the f*ckin tower and start wasting people. Yeah, we get angry. We go fucking ape-shit…anger and rage are part of the territory. But war doesn’t make you a murderer. It makes you very intolerant of stupid petty bullshit.
Medication can help. Zoloft helped me. Still does. But it ain’t a magic bullet. 

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Al, most “therapists” are moron libtards.  Not all, but most.  I had to attend an alcohol class some years ago and the instructor kept telling the class that even having a single drink was wrong and made you an alcoholic.  I asked the dimwit broad if she had ever had a drink.  Can you guess what her answer was ?
 
She said that she had never taken a single drink.  IMHO, that means she was either a liar or completely unqualified to teach that class.

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I pretty much gave up on the VA when I filed for my ptsd claim and they sent me a letter back stating i have never been in a threatening situation where I was in mortal danger or felt my life was in danger! I’d like to take that civilian counselor who did my eval and stick her in a dessert for 30 days while I lob morters and old rockets at her ass. now don’t get me wrong, I in no way was out in the thick of shit busting down doors and risking my life in the cities/streets on a regular basis, but I saw my share of crap. I know people such as my Cousin who has PTSD 40x’s worse than mine, to the point he was a danger to himself and others. Ive been told by every counselor i’ve talked to I have PTSD. The best way I can describe the way I feel is I’m frustrated/stressed/rushed all at the same time 24/7. I constantly feel a knot in my chest from the anxiety. Anytime I schedule an apt. with the VA to see a counselor I get dicked over. The VA is almost friggen worthless when it comes to mental care. I see a counselor at a Vet center about 20 min from my house and since then i’m starting to understand thigs a bit better. I know it’s not legal but pot was the only thing that worked for me. It’s much safer than drinking and other drugs and is not chemically addictive. If I was sober2 or 3 years ago I was just constantly agrivated and impossible to please or get along with. Pot was the only thing that made me feel normal again. I’m not saying we should all go out and get baked, but I’d prefer that to taking an ice cream scoop out of my brain with the extacy. Extacy is the stupidest thing i’ve ever heard! if you know anything about it it is usually cut with coke, heroin, speed, crack, meth, or any other life ruining drug you can think of! I think some idiot just wanted an excuse to get f’d up! ;p

 
 
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