Sgt Grit Newsletter - 30 OCT 2014

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• Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51
• Special Assignment
• Out-Of-Body Experience

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Happy Halloween 2014


Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51

Al at dealership with his Z51 Corvette

Z51 Corvette on profile display with Marine Corp Flag

I spent 14 years in the Marine Corps from 1965 to 1979. Now, as the Sr. Vice Commandant of the Marine Corps League (MCL), MGySgt John W. Zaengle Detachment in Glenside, Pa, I wanted my Vette to be "A Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans." Also to use the car at our local car shows to draw attention to the MCL and what we do Marines, their families and veterans.

(Also, had 22 years in Air National Guard.)

Back in April 2013 I put my deposit down on a 2014 Corvette. Of course I was on an allocation list at my dealership in Jenkintown, Pa. I've dealt with them since the 80's and refused to go to another dealership. This was a very special order. Since there was a restriction on the Z51 option, I couldn't even get my order into the system.

The car show season was ramping up, so I contacted an Executive Vice President at General Motors & explained my situation and why I was trying to get the car. The Executive Vice President's office, the Zone Manager, and my dealership all worked together. Everyone was extremely professional and a pleasure to work with. They constantly kept me updated on the progress of my order.

I was able to get the car ordered and delivered in about 6-8 weeks. With all the options I requested, including the Z51 option and the override for the interior color.

The Corvette "Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans" is a special color combination:

1. Laguna Blue, for the Marine Corps dress blue uniform.
2. With dual Crystal Red racing stripes, for the Red Blood stripes that are down each side of the dress blues trousers.
3. Red Interior is to honor those Marines that have shed their blood in defense of our country.

At every show or on the road, people, young and old are taken back by the beauty of the car. It has proven to be the perfect tribute to our Marines.

As of a couple days ago I found that this car is one of 31 - Z51 optioned 2014 Corvettes with dual Crystal Red racing stripes. I'm waiting for the National Corvette Museum to let me know if this is the only one in the Laguna Blue with dual Crystal Red racing stripes & Red/Black Interior color combination. I have to call them back next week to see if this a 1 of 1 car.

I've included a some pictures for you.

Semper Fi!
Al DePue
Marine Corps League
Sr. Vice Commandant
MGySgt. John W. Zaengle Detachment


Racetrack

Sgt. Grit,

When I was in boot Platoon 370 at San Diego (65), one of the Staff DIs was Sgt. McGee. He was crabby most of the time, but displayed a tremendous sense of humor, always at our expense, of course.

He would barely whisper "Get on the road" out of his office door. Someone in the first billet would hear the order and frantically yell it down the line. Since we stumbled into formation in cluster f-ck fashion, he'd punish us with a "Get in the billets" followed immediately by "Get your footlockers and get on the road." Then, "Get in the billets, get on the road, get in the billets, get on the road, girls we're gonna play "racetrack." "Racetrack" entailed gathering a squad of recruits with footlockers into one of those squares of ice plants on either side of the entrances to each billet. We all had busted knuckles, but I can't help but chuckle to myself when I think of how foolish we must have looked. Truth is, that's my kind of humor and "racetrack" is one of my fondest Marine memories.

Semper Fi,
James M. Robinson
SSgt. USMC
1965-1969
Minneapolis


Vietnam Ribbon Cover/Hat


Special Assignment

I was stationed with Mike Company, 3rd Bn, 9th Marines at Camp Sukiran, Okinawa (not Okinawa, Japan) in 1958. Our Staff NCO's had single rooms in the barracks.

One night, one of our Sgts (E-4) had a little too much to drink out in the ville. Upon his return to his squad bay on the second deck in the barracks, he had to use the head. So, he enters the head, and makes use of the urinal. Unfortunately, the Company Gunny's room was right next door to the head and he had gone in the wrong door. The "urinal" turned out to be the Gunny's blanket folded over a radiator. Next morning, in company formation, the Gunny calls out "Sgt Matt-----, front and center. Seems like he had a special assignment for him.

Capt Art Kidd
USMC Ret
1957-1977


Marine Football Program

On the Marine Football Program story (Jim Grimes), I recognized one of the names immediately.

Jim Weatherall, who played ball here locally in White Deer, TX, was the Outland Trophy winner in 1951 at Oklahoma, and went on to play a number of years in the NFL with Detroit, Philly, and the Redskins. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Given the size (and obviously the conditioning, being Marines) of these men in that era, these must have been some pretty darn good football teams.

Dr J B Boren
Amarillo, TX​


Tie-Ties

Here's your challenge for the day!

At Parris Island in 1959 we held a laundry day about once a week... Go to the wash rack behind our barracks and be equipped with the following gear: galvanized bucket, scrub brush, soap bar, and tie-ties.

Tie-ties were used to attach cleaned items to the overhead drying lines (not like the clothes pins that mother used). After an informal search for them they seem to be an item only used at P I and anyone after us Old Corps haven't even heard of such a thing (Do recruits now have commercial laundry services, or electric washing machines, or what?).

​Thanks
MGBGYRENE


Marines STAND

Recruits at MCRD San Diego Battalion Commander Inspection

This image was posted last week on the Sgt Grit Facebook page. The image displays recruits at MCRD San Diego standing at parade rest during a Battalion Commander's inspection. The text on the image reads "MARINES STAND... Serve with, Tactfulness, Accountability, Nobility, and Discipline."

Here are some of the comments left by fans about this post:


Tommy Hicks - M16 they will never feel what the recoil of a M14 feels like.


Daniel Grgurich - I love the 14, what better weapon to take out your enemies at 800 yards.


Beverly Hoyt Holmes - guy in second rank has his knees locked :)


Kenneth Sr Scruggs - Only wore my barracks cover twice,the rest of my tour,I wore the p-ss cover.


Loren Petty Not - so sure about the tact. I have known many tactless Marines, and am probably one of them.


Raymond M. Muro - I am a U.S. Marine, I am the measure against which all others fall short.


View more comments about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Powder Coated Stainless Steel Lockback Folding Knife


I Knew I Was An SOB

I remember Boot Camp, but I don't remember being beaten, but I do remember Marching until I thought I would die, I remember marching one night after midnight, carrying my bucket full of sand until I thought my arm would fall off. But I wasn't going to give up. I was only 17 years old and when I graduated from Boot Camp, the DI came to me and said; "I didn't think you would make it, you were young, dumb and stupid to boot. I still don't think you will make it!"

All this gave me incentive and I made it but I busted my asz to do it. When I received my emblems I was the proudest SOB in the world (I knew I was an SOB because I was called that so many times in the past few weeks). After further training I finally was sent overseas and I couldn't wait to go into battle. Everyone thought I looked too young and I was given every Sh-t job until finally somehow I slipped through the knot hole and ended up on a ship, an APA. Then somehow me and three other guys had our records lost and no one knew what to do with us.

Finally a smart Clerk/typist or 1st Sgt. knew what to do and got us going and I ended up on Guam on the day it was secured, August 30th, 1944. Instead of fighting I worked my Butt Off loading and unloading supplies, the only enemy I met or saw were Dead and there must have been at least three enemy captured and behind barbed wire clad only in loin cloth's. When I said three I meant three, thats all I saw. I think because I was so small (5'6") and young looking, I went from pillar to post with three other guys.

I ended up on an APA during the Okinawa Invasion, standing on board the ship looking through a Telescope (some sailor had mounted on the deck) I kept a desire for me to go ashore and do my share. Then one day I heard some one calling out and somebody crying and I ran to see what it was.

Japanese civilians were jumping off a cliff, I must have been nineteen years old by this time and could only hope I would soon go ashore. But it wasn't to be. Later when I looked at my new record book I noticed I had participated in the Campaign for Okinawa Junto and the Campaign of the Marianas Island, some old Marine said to me; "What difference does it make, YOU were THERE".

I went back to Pearl Harbor on the APA and ended up in a Guard Detachment. The War ended and because I was loading and unloading supplies, so when I was given a new Record Book I was given a Supply Spec Number (What the MOS was called then), Supply and Administration Spec Numbers were froze and couldn't return to the US until all the 745's (Old rifleman Spec Number) and even the 521's (Basic Marine) had gone home. I finally got home on 10 March 1946, almost six months after the War was over.

I got out and went Home expecting a World Welcoming me home with open arms and a GREAT Job. That wasn't to be either because too many Veterans were already Home and the Job Market was crammed with World War II Vet's, so I joined the 52/20 Club. Congress had passed a law allowing Veterans to Recieve $20.00 a week for 52 weeks unless they got you a job (AND you had to make all appointments the Employment Office Made for you).

H-ll, I had more fun in the Corps and went to the Recruiting Station and asked; "Will you take Veterans?" "H-ll Yes" he said, so I took the Oath and climbed back into Uniform, This time to stay, or so I thought!

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


I Had The Dubious Pleasure

Sgt. Grit,

Allow me, please, to reply to two recent letters in your October 23, 2014 newsletter.

To: Henry ("Hank") Nocella

Only those who have received a less than honorable discharge are "former Marines". You are, and always will be, a Marine - period. You are now wearing a different uniform. That uniform may be a suit and tie. It could also be blue with a badge on the shirt. The uniforms Marines wear are as many and as varied as the men and women who wear them. I'm honored to count myself as one of your Marine brothers.

To: Gary Harlan

I would first like to apologize if I offended you by "implying" that Marines leave or left the Marine Corps because of "peer pressure". I didn't mean to "imply" anything other than the fact that "peer pressure" is a powerful force, back then as well as today. There are many (too numerous to mention) reasons why Marines choose to leave active duty. "Peer pressure" is but one. When we were young, all of us made decisions that later in life we might wish we had made differently. We were young, immature, and sometimes foolish. Frequently, we were placed in unfamiliar surroundings that were dangerous, life threatening. We adjusted to being Marines (a different way of life) in a variety of ways. Many simply decided that the Marine way of life wasn't for them as a career. I don't believe there is a WRONG reason for not making the Marine Corps a career. Every Marine must do what they believe is best for them. The length of time a Marine stays in the Marine Corps, their MOS, or their duty station is absolutely immaterial. What's material is the fact that we are Marine brothers, today, tomorrow, and forever. We all contributed what we could to the accomplishment of the mission. I was also just reflecting on what life as a Marine was like back then.

I had the dubious pleasure of serving 44 months in Vietnam. My first operation was Hastings with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. I was with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines in Hue City and the Tet Offensive in 1968. Captain Ronald Christmas was our Company Commander. He is a retired Lt/Gen and quite instrumental in building the Marine Corps Museum. There were other operations sprinkled through those many months. Many Marines who had no intention of making the Marine Corps a career put their lives on the line for me and other Marines. The hero's names are on the wall in Washington, DC. I'm proud and honored to have served with men of that caliber. Whether a Marine intended to make the Marine Corps a career never made any difference to me. Marines, like you, who didn't make the Marine Corps a career did no less than those of us who chose to make it a career. We who wear the emblem earned it and wear it proudly regardless of where we served or how long we served.

Semper Fi
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Out-Of-Body Experience

Dear Sgt Grit,

I've been reading about some of the troubles some Marines received at boot camp when they got letters with initials written on the backs (SWAK, etc.).

My experience was slightly different.

My older brother was in the Marines eight years before me. When I first got to Parris Island, we recruits were told we were not to receive any mail until further notice and to write and tell everyone "No mail" yet. About the fifth day on the island most of the recruits saw a package on the DI's table at day's end, and after all the remarks that senior drill instructor GySgt Delkowski had to say, he suddenly held up the package and called MY name to come front and center. He asked me if I was expecting any contraband. "Sir, No Sir" I answered. He then asked if I recognized the name and address of the sendee and shoved the package about 2 inches in front of my face. Crossed eyed, I recognized my older brothers writing and wanted to crawl into a hole, because I knew this was not going to end well for me. I said as much as I could in as short a time as possible that it was my older brother... he was in the Marines in the early 50's... he hated me... he's home laughing at me right now... please throw the package away. Other stuff, too, but I can't remember it all now. He then told me to open the package right where I was and show him what's inside. I could see that it was from a quality candy maker in our area, and was sweating about what was going to happen to me.

When I showed him what was in the package he said "What are you going to do with the contents, maggot?" I said pass it around the squad bay (hoping that I wouldn't have to eat the entire contents myself). He said "My maggots don't eat pogy bait, do they maggots?" Everyone yelled louder than anything I had ever heard before, "Sir, No Sir." He says "Well, pass it around the squad bay sh-t head." After I made a trip around the port and starboard sides of the squad bay I returned with the package as full as when I started. I dreaded what I thought was going to happen next, two pounds of chocolate candy crammed down my throat, asphyxiation, death, not becoming a Marine after all.

"Seeing as this is the first time this has happened, I'll keep the package as a reminder to not receive mail until I say you t-rds can receive mail, is that clear people?" he said. "Sir Yes Sir" everyone but me answered. I was having an out-of-body experience about then and it took a few seconds for the words to sink in. When I refocused my eyes he was saying "Dismissed". I stepped back, about faced, and ran faster than I ever ran before to my bunk in case he changed his mind.

Two days later somebody else wasn't so lucky when he had to eat a box of Oreos with Tide laundry detergent poured on them. Didn't take long for the upchucking to start.

By the way, I thanked my brother for sending the package of candy when he did, and he was dumbstruck! I didn't tell him I never had to eat them and I'm sure the DI's had a good time with them.

Got another boot camp story to tell, but it'll be for another time.

L/Cpl Rich Townsend
189xxxx


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #4)

I did not know that my parents had returned to the area and I was shocked to learn that they had purchased The Hemlocks. They had passed that property hundreds - maybe thousands - of times and would often comment about what a lovely place it was. I don't think they ever dreamed of someday owning it. But I am sure they had never really expected to get $464,088 for our farm either. I did not know what they had paid for The Hemlocks but Mr.'B' said it was 'an all cash transaction' and I was sure this property cost MUCH LESS than that. I could not reach my parents by phone and it was almost 2100. I told the 'Bs' that I would go over there in the morning. Mrs.'B' said "You look tired. You won't have to sleep on the sofa tonight. You can go up and sleep in Mary's bed. I am sorry that she will not be joining you - but when you get up there you will think she is there, too. Her room is permeated with the odor of her Prince Matchabelli perfume." And it sure was! This just made me miss her all the more. I slept like a log until my usual wake up time - 0500. I did not wish to disturb anyone so I just laid there and thought about going over to The Hemlocks and seeing my parents for the first time in over a year.

When I heard the 'Bs' going downstairs I got up and took my usual quick shower and got dressed. When I went downstairs Mrs.'B' asked if I would like some breakfast. I said "I'll pass again. I am sure my mother will insist on my having breakfast with them - even if I have stuffed myself here." I told the 'Bs' that I would see them again later in the day and headed over to The Hemlocks. I was sure that my parents and I had a great deal to tell each other. This trip took about 15 minutes or so. I pulled into the long, circular driveway in front of their new home - right up behind my Dad's Rocket Oldsmobile '98'. I sat there a moment and looked at this house. It must have been 60 feet long and 24 feet deep (What I could see at that time. I later learned that the middle third was about 10 or 12 feet deeper.) It was three stories high. I walked to the front door and used the large brass knocker to let them know they had a visitor. My Mom answered and my Dad was only a few steps behind her. We hugged and kissed. My Mom said "I knew you were in the area. We had been here only one day when the mail carrier delivered our first letter. He said he wasn't sure if it was for the Cecils or the new owners. It was the smallest letter I have ever seen in the U.S. Mail. It was for you. I do not know who it is from. It is postmarked from Washington, D.C. and smells like it was dipped in perfume." I knew who it was from. Mom handed it to me. The letter was only about one inch bigger in each direction than a business card. It was addressed to 'Sgt. H. T. Freas, USMC, The Hemlocks, Mt. Laurel Road, Moorestown, N.J.' I slipped it into my pocket. Mom said "Aren't you going to open it?" I said "I'll open it later." She looked a bit puzzled about this.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Smedley D. Butler's Signature

There are probably many more versions of the Marines' Hymn than most can count.

Circa 1963 a few miles West of Lawrence, Kansas. I met someone who I later found out was a Marine. We helped him and his wife escape from a tornado which appeared to be headed towards their house. It was less than 1/4 mile away when we went high port and got away. It missed their house by 100 yds. We got back to his house and found out he was a Marine too. He had participate in the second campaign of Nicaragua. He said when he got discharged from the Marines, it was the day Smedley D. Butler retired. After Gen Butler signed his discharge papers they walked out of headquarters building together. He dug out his discharge paper and there was Smedley D. Butler's signature.

He also dug out copies of the words for the Marine Corps Hymn that lamented, and described, and cussed Nicaragua. There were quite a few versus. Wish I could remember the words.

It never stops amazing me the types of stories you can hear from old Marines if you just take the time to sit a listen. I've met and talked to two Marines that participated in one of the Chinese boxer rebellions and of course this Nicaragua Marine. Most memorable one to me was one that survived the Bataan(sp) Death March.

They gave me much to live up to.

(Hoogie) Gysgt/Capt USMC (ret)
1960-1980


Apprentices Of War: Memoir Of A Marine Grunt

Apprentice of War Book Cover

Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt is a book by Gary Tornes, who served as a United States Marine during the Vietnam War. He tells a vivid and memorable account of military life and the struggles of the foot Marine in Viet Nam. His story illustrates the timeless tragedy of combat that faced the American Marine of that generation. It reveals an emotional and compelling side to what a grunt's life was like on a daily basis in the jungles of Nam. And while Gary takes his readers into the combat zone of that particular war, and tells how the average Marine tried to survive the bloody and brutal challenges in southeast Asia, it's a story that any Marine from any conflict can relate to. The power packed, in-depth, detailed action of Apprentices of War will give you an insight into what he and his fellow Marines encountered and makes Gary's book hard to put down.

Get your hardback copy today at: Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt.


Then Armageddon Started

Six of us from NE Okla (Miami) joined on the 1st of Aug 1953, bussed to KC to catch a train to MCRD San Diego. We got there fairly late and rode cattle cars to the Depot. We were taken to the north side of Grinder, one of the old buildings facing it and we were put on the top floor of very large room with a total of about 100 newbies. There was a flat roof off the front of the room and we all went outside to observe our new world. A DI walking in arcade under us heard the noise and stepped out in the assumed the pose... hands on hips, sneer on mouth. After a 6-minute azs chewing, he advised us to get our stupid civilian Aszzes inside... Then Armageddon started... Supposedly some guy with a defective brain gave him the middle finger salute and then the fun began.

Before we got inside, he was upstairs and had stopped on the first floor and had gotten 3 or 4 other DI's... (assistants I suppose)... briefed them on the situation and everyone was ready... Unfortunately the guy who (reportedly) gave him the salute was wearing a blue shirt, as was I and quite a few others. Of course we got special attention... I was raised with Yes Sir and Yes Mam but some of these guys weren't and they seemed too dumb to understand that, that was required...

After about 30 minutes (seemed like hours) we were told to get into the bunks and do nothing but breathe till morning... I have no idea if this was a staged production or not but it worked...

As with everyone else in the room I wondered as I tried to go to sleep, what the h-ll; have I gotten into... but we soon found out...

Sgt Don Wackerly
1953-1956


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #5)

I had stepped inside. It seemed like I had walked into a museum. The ceilings were about 12 feet high. Seeing my Mom & Dad for the first time in over a year was a pleasure. Mom said "I want to show you around - but I want to get you some breakfast first. What can I fix for you?" I replied "ANYTHING. I have not eaten since lunch yesterday at the Midway." That made her day. She started to work on one of her huge breakfasts. I sat at the very large marble top table that she had acquired when we bought the farm in 1939. I admired the place. It was HUGE, a quite typical 'country kitchen' - about 20 feet square - but all of the kitchen appliances were modern. She fixed my usual half dozen FRESH eggs - sunny side up, scrapple, bacon, corn meal mush and my quart of milk. (I mentioned FRESH eggs because the USMC was still using cold storage eggs purchased for WWII).

Mom & Dad were anxious to show me around. The 'Living Room' and 'Sitting Room' were each about 20 by 24 ft. We went upstairs. The ceilings on the 2nd floor - with four bedrooms and two baths - were 'only' about 10 feet tall - and those on the 3rd floor with another four bedrooms and two baths were the usual 8 feet. There was an attic, too, but I did not go up there. Mrs. Cecil had left a lot of antique furniture that she had no room for in her new home. Mom loved these but had not yet decided where she would put them - and she might be selling some of them. Then we went outside to see the barn and other outbuildings. The nearest building was about the size of a standard poultry house, about 22x26 ft. It was fully enclosed with a big lock on the doors. Then there were four sheds, about 26 ft. deep, with open fronts. The total width of the four was about 100 ft. They were empty. The machinery that had at one time been stored in them was long gone. And then we were at the barn - the biggest barn I had ever seen. We went inside. It had milking stalls for 100 cows and four birthing pens. And of course an enclosed milkhouse over in one corner. I climbed the ladder to look into the haymow. It was huge and reminded me of an airplane hanger. It was empty. (If you had no cows you needed no hay) I climbed down and went over to look into the milkhouse. Then we walked towards the house. We looked at all the beautiful shrubbery and flowers that Mrs. Cecil had planted. My Dad, a born gardener, really liked these.

We walked towards the front of the house. Dad wanted to see my new Buick. He liked it. He asked "What happened to your Hudson?" I replied "I'll tell you the whole sordid story when we get back into the house. How many miles do you have on your Olds?" He said "It's just about to go over 20,000 miles." (And that was in just over a year while on one vacation around the United States) We went inside the house and sat down in the living room. I said "Now that you are sitting down, I will tell you about the demise of the Hudson. I do not know where you were on the 2nd Sunday in April, but you came within a gnats whisker of losing your youngest son."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


Taps

Whitehall, N.Y. – Joseph J."Coach" Marcino, Jr., 91, of Whitehall, died Monday, October 20, 2014 at Glens Falls Hospital surrounded by his loving family by his side following a brief illness.

He was born on May 25, 1923 in Whitehall, N.Y. the son of Joseph and Angela (Bagnacelli) Marcino. Joseph was a member of the American Legion Post #83 of Whitehall. He was also a member of Our Lady of Hope Roman Catholic Church of Whitehall. Joseph was a graduate of Whitehall High School. He then enlisted into the United States Marines Corps serving in WW II, achieving the rank of Sergeant. While serving with Company A, Fifth Tank Battalion, Fifth Marine Division on Volcano Islands on Iwo Jima on March 18, 1945, his tank became disabled forward of the enemy lines. Under heavy enemy fire, he and his crew dismounted the tank and made repairs enabling them to continue forward on their mission. For his devotion and courage, he was awarded the Bronze Star.


Short Rounds

In response to Sgt O:

In 2012 I was at a reunion of 1/9 in San Diego and we attended a graduation while there, and there were a few recruits that were graduating as not only E-2 but some E-3's.

GySgt Larry Schafer, 214xxxx
MCRDSD, platoon 361, Aug '65
Co B, 2ndAmTracBn, Camp Lejeune Jan66-Sep66
A, Co, 1/9 Oct66-Feb67 RVN
CAP-P, Feb67-Oct67 RVN
I&I, Pasadena, Calif., Nov67-Aug69


Hi Sgt.,

We all know the tradition of who gets the first and second piece of our birthday cake. I have a great idea on who should get the third piece of cake, etc. Any Marine who was born on November 10th. starting with the oldest.

Once And Always... Semper Fi!

Brian Stack
P.S. By the way I was born on November 10, 1941 :)


Grimes, get your Dod-gamned, hucking fands out of your pockets! Give me ALL of the squat thrusts in the known universe Grimes!

Grimes with Marine Vets that he went to boot camp with


To "Gy Mac" about the poser: do what I did with one, retire then slap him upside the head and call him a loser. To those arguing about rank leaving boot: Anthony "Squid" Bovenvize left MCRDPICS in 1969 as an E-4, former Navy Corpsman.

Peter Dahlstrom


Gunny McMahon, the lyrics 'Admiration of the Nation' were replaced with 'First to Fight for Right and Freedom' around 1929/1930.

GySgt. P. Santiago
1946-1968


Sgt. Grit,

My suggestion to GySgt Mac. Gunny, don't waste your time and effort. However, if you insist on confronting the poser, then do it calmly and deliberately. And do it without getting physical or loud. I'll bet most of the other employees are well aware that he's lying. I'll also bet that they have little or no respect for the poser. I admire you for wanting to defend our Marine Corps and all Marines against posers whose lies make us all cringe. But he just isn't worth it, now or ever. Semper Fi - Devil Dog - Good Luck.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Here's a 55-year old quickie:

Drill on the P I grinder in 100-degree heat, our Senior D I gave us an at-ease break for the canteen and salt pills.

At the same time he dropped his trousers to square away and tuck in his shirt. Much to the whole platoon's surprise we saw that his bright and white skivvies were decorated with red hearts. (And we realized that this "monster" had a life off the drill field and was human after all!)

​MGBGYRENE


Thanks, for best coffee cup in universe,oohra!

Scott

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Quotes

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive."
--C.S. Lewis


"Freedom is not free, but the U.S. Marine Corps will pay most of your share."
--Ned Dolan


"[T]he crisis is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition, that can be heaped upon us, till custom and use shall make us as tame and abject slaves."
--George Washington (1774)


"A Marine is a Marine. I set that policy two weeks ago - there's no such thing as a former Marine. You're a Marine, just in a different uniform and you're in a different phase of your life. But you'll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico. There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps


"Life without liberty is like a body without spirit."
--Kahlil Gibran


"An honest man can feel no pleasure in the exercise of power over his fellow citizens."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1813


"What is the difference between a fairy tale and a sea story? One starts out once upon a time and the other starts out hey man this is no BULLSH-T."

"I'm so short I'm sleeping in a match box using a rifle patch for a blanket."

"Bends and mothers until you change the rotation of the earth!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 30 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51
• Special Assignment
• Out-Of-Body Experience

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Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51

I spent 14 years in the Marine Corps from 1965 to 1979. Now, as the Sr. Vice Commandant of the Marine Corps League (MCL), MGySgt John W. Zaengle Detachment in Glenside, Pa, I wanted my Vette to be "A Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans." Also to use the car at our local car shows to draw attention to the MCL and what we do Marines, their families and veterans.

(Also, had 22 years in Air National Guard.)

Back in April 2013 I put my deposit down on a 2014 Corvette. Of course I was on an allocation list at my dealership in Jenkintown, Pa. I've dealt with them since the 80's and refused to go to another dealership. This was a very special order. Since there was a restriction on the Z51 option, I couldn't even get my order into the system.

The car show season was ramping up, so I contacted an Executive Vice President at General Motors & explained my situation and why I was trying to get the car. The Executive Vice President's office, the Zone Manager, and my dealership all worked together. Everyone was extremely professional and a pleasure to work with. They constantly kept me updated on the progress of my order.

I was able to get the car ordered and delivered in about 6-8 weeks. With all the options I requested, including the Z51 option and the override for the interior color.

The Corvette "Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans" is a special color combination:

1. Laguna Blue, for the Marine Corps dress blue uniform.
2. With dual Crystal Red racing stripes, for the Red Blood stripes that are down each side of the dress blues trousers.
3. Red Interior is to honor those Marines that have shed their blood in defense of our country.

At every show or on the road, people, young and old are taken back by the beauty of the car. It has proven to be the perfect tribute to our Marines.

As of a couple days ago I found that this car is one of 31 - Z51 optioned 2014 Corvettes with dual Crystal Red racing stripes. I'm waiting for the National Corvette Museum to let me know if this is the only one in the Laguna Blue with dual Crystal Red racing stripes & Red/Black Interior color combination. I have to call them back next week to see if this a 1 of 1 car.

I've included a some pictures for you.

Semper Fi!
Al DePue
Marine Corps League
Sr. Vice Commandant
MGySgt. John W. Zaengle Detachment


Racetrack

Sgt. Grit,

When I was in boot Platoon 370 at San Diego (65), one of the Staff DIs was Sgt. McGee. He was crabby most of the time, but displayed a tremendous sense of humor, always at our expense, of course.

He would barely whisper "Get on the road" out of his office door. Someone in the first billet would hear the order and frantically yell it down the line. Since we stumbled into formation in cluster f-ck fashion, he'd punish us with a "Get in the billets" followed immediately by "Get your footlockers and get on the road." Then, "Get in the billets, get on the road, get in the billets, get on the road, girls we're gonna play "racetrack." "Racetrack" entailed gathering a squad of recruits with footlockers into one of those squares of ice plants on either side of the entrances to each billet. We all had busted knuckles, but I can't help but chuckle to myself when I think of how foolish we must have looked. Truth is, that's my kind of humor and "racetrack" is one of my fondest Marine memories.

Semper Fi,
James M. Robinson
SSgt. USMC
1965-1969
Minneapolis


Special Assignment

I was stationed with Mike Company, 3rd Bn, 9th Marines at Camp Sukiran, Okinawa (not Okinawa, Japan) in 1958. Our Staff NCO's had single rooms in the barracks.

One night, one of our Sgts (E-4) had a little too much to drink out in the ville. Upon his return to his squad bay on the second deck in the barracks, he had to use the head. So, he enters the head, and makes use of the urinal. Unfortunately, the Company Gunny's room was right next door to the head and he had gone in the wrong door. The "urinal" turned out to be the Gunny's blanket folded over a radiator. Next morning, in company formation, the Gunny calls out "Sgt Matt-----, front and center. Seems like he had a special assignment for him.

Capt Art Kidd
USMC Ret
1957-1977


Marine Football Program

On the Marine Football Program story (Jim Grimes), I recognized one of the names immediately.

Jim Weatherall, who played ball here locally in White Deer, TX, was the Outland Trophy winner in 1951 at Oklahoma, and went on to play a number of years in the NFL with Detroit, Philly, and the Redskins. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Given the size (and obviously the conditioning, being Marines) of these men in that era, these must have been some pretty darn good football teams.

Dr J B Boren
Amarillo, TX​


Tie-Ties

Here's your challenge for the day!

At Parris Island in 1959 we held a laundry day about once a week... Go to the wash rack behind our barracks and be equipped with the following gear: galvanized bucket, scrub brush, soap bar, and tie-ties.

Tie-ties were used to attach cleaned items to the overhead drying lines (not like the clothes pins that mother used). After an informal search for them they seem to be an item only used at P I and anyone after us Old Corps haven't even heard of such a thing (Do recruits now have commercial laundry services, or electric washing machines, or what?).

​Thanks
MGBGYRENE


Marines STAND

This image was posted last week on the Sgt Grit Facebook page. The image displays recruits at MCRD San Diego standing at parade rest during a Battalion Commander's inspection. The text on the image reads "MARINES STAND... Serve with, Tactfulness, Accountability, Nobility, and Discipline."

Here are some of the comments left by fans about this post:


Tommy Hicks - M16 they will never feel what the recoil of a M14 feels like.


Daniel Grgurich - I love the 14, what better weapon to take out your enemies at 800 yards.


Beverly Hoyt Holmes - guy in second rank has his knees locked :)


Kenneth Sr Scruggs - Only wore my barracks cover twice,the rest of my tour,I wore the p-ss cover.


Loren Petty Not - so sure about the tact. I have known many tactless Marines, and am probably one of them.


Raymond M. Muro - I am a U.S. Marine, I am the measure against which all others fall short.


View more comments about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


I Knew I Was An SOB

I remember Boot Camp, but I don't remember being beaten, but I do remember Marching until I thought I would die, I remember marching one night after midnight, carrying my bucket full of sand until I thought my arm would fall off. But I wasn't going to give up. I was only 17 years old and when I graduated from Boot Camp, the DI came to me and said; "I didn't think you would make it, you were young, dumb and stupid to boot. I still don't think you will make it!"

All this gave me incentive and I made it but I busted my asz to do it. When I received my emblems I was the proudest SOB in the world (I knew I was an SOB because I was called that so many times in the past few weeks). After further training I finally was sent overseas and I couldn't wait to go into battle. Everyone thought I looked too young and I was given every Sh-t job until finally somehow I slipped through the knot hole and ended up on a ship, an APA. Then somehow me and three other guys had our records lost and no one knew what to do with us.

Finally a smart Clerk/typist or 1st Sgt. knew what to do and got us going and I ended up on Guam on the day it was secured, August 30th, 1944. Instead of fighting I worked my Butt Off loading and unloading supplies, the only enemy I met or saw were Dead and there must have been at least three enemy captured and behind barbed wire clad only in loin cloth's. When I said three I meant three, thats all I saw. I think because I was so small (5'6") and young looking, I went from pillar to post with three other guys.

I ended up on an APA during the Okinawa Invasion, standing on board the ship looking through a Telescope (some sailor had mounted on the deck) I kept a desire for me to go ashore and do my share. Then one day I heard some one calling out and somebody crying and I ran to see what it was.

Japanese civilians were jumping off a cliff, I must have been nineteen years old by this time and could only hope I would soon go ashore. But it wasn't to be. Later when I looked at my new record book I noticed I had participated in the Campaign for Okinawa Junto and the Campaign of the Marianas Island, some old Marine said to me; "What difference does it make, YOU were THERE".

I went back to Pearl Harbor on the APA and ended up in a Guard Detachment. The War ended and because I was loading and unloading supplies, so when I was given a new Record Book I was given a Supply Spec Number (What the MOS was called then), Supply and Administration Spec Numbers were froze and couldn't return to the US until all the 745's (Old rifleman Spec Number) and even the 521's (Basic Marine) had gone home. I finally got home on 10 March 1946, almost six months after the War was over.

I got out and went Home expecting a World Welcoming me home with open arms and a GREAT Job. That wasn't to be either because too many Veterans were already Home and the Job Market was crammed with World War II Vet's, so I joined the 52/20 Club. Congress had passed a law allowing Veterans to Recieve $20.00 a week for 52 weeks unless they got you a job (AND you had to make all appointments the Employment Office Made for you).

H-ll, I had more fun in the Corps and went to the Recruiting Station and asked; "Will you take Veterans?" "H-ll Yes" he said, so I took the Oath and climbed back into Uniform, This time to stay, or so I thought!

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


I Had The Dubious Pleasure

Sgt. Grit,

Allow me, please, to reply to two recent letters in your October 23, 2014 newsletter.

To: Henry ("Hank") Nocella

Only those who have received a less than honorable discharge are "former Marines". You are, and always will be, a Marine - period. You are now wearing a different uniform. That uniform may be a suit and tie. It could also be blue with a badge on the shirt. The uniforms Marines wear are as many and as varied as the men and women who wear them. I'm honored to count myself as one of your Marine brothers.

To: Gary Harlan

I would first like to apologize if I offended you by "implying" that Marines leave or left the Marine Corps because of "peer pressure". I didn't mean to "imply" anything other than the fact that "peer pressure" is a powerful force, back then as well as today. There are many (too numerous to mention) reasons why Marines choose to leave active duty. "Peer pressure" is but one. When we were young, all of us made decisions that later in life we might wish we had made differently. We were young, immature, and sometimes foolish. Frequently, we were placed in unfamiliar surroundings that were dangerous, life threatening. We adjusted to being Marines (a different way of life) in a variety of ways. Many simply decided that the Marine way of life wasn't for them as a career. I don't believe there is a WRONG reason for not making the Marine Corps a career. Every Marine must do what they believe is best for them. The length of time a Marine stays in the Marine Corps, their MOS, or their duty station is absolutely immaterial. What's material is the fact that we are Marine brothers, today, tomorrow, and forever. We all contributed what we could to the accomplishment of the mission. I was also just reflecting on what life as a Marine was like back then.

I had the dubious pleasure of serving 44 months in Vietnam. My first operation was Hastings with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. I was with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines in Hue City and the Tet Offensive in 1968. Captain Ronald Christmas was our Company Commander. He is a retired Lt/Gen and quite instrumental in building the Marine Corps Museum. There were other operations sprinkled through those many months. Many Marines who had no intention of making the Marine Corps a career put their lives on the line for me and other Marines. The hero's names are on the wall in Washington, DC. I'm proud and honored to have served with men of that caliber. Whether a Marine intended to make the Marine Corps a career never made any difference to me. Marines, like you, who didn't make the Marine Corps a career did no less than those of us who chose to make it a career. We who wear the emblem earned it and wear it proudly regardless of where we served or how long we served.

Semper Fi
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Out-Of-Body Experience

Dear Sgt Grit,

I've been reading about some of the troubles some Marines received at boot camp when they got letters with initials written on the backs (SWAK, etc.).

My experience was slightly different.

My older brother was in the Marines eight years before me. When I first got to Parris Island, we recruits were told we were not to receive any mail until further notice and to write and tell everyone "No mail" yet. About the fifth day on the island most of the recruits saw a package on the DI's table at day's end, and after all the remarks that senior drill instructor GySgt Delkowski had to say, he suddenly held up the package and called MY name to come front and center. He asked me if I was expecting any contraband. "Sir, No Sir" I answered. He then asked if I recognized the name and address of the sendee and shoved the package about 2 inches in front of my face. Crossed eyed, I recognized my older brothers writing and wanted to crawl into a hole, because I knew this was not going to end well for me. I said as much as I could in as short a time as possible that it was my older brother... he was in the Marines in the early 50's... he hated me... he's home laughing at me right now... please throw the package away. Other stuff, too, but I can't remember it all now. He then told me to open the package right where I was and show him what's inside. I could see that it was from a quality candy maker in our area, and was sweating about what was going to happen to me.

When I showed him what was in the package he said "What are you going to do with the contents, maggot?" I said pass it around the squad bay (hoping that I wouldn't have to eat the entire contents myself). He said "My maggots don't eat pogy bait, do they maggots?" Everyone yelled louder than anything I had ever heard before, "Sir, No Sir." He says "Well, pass it around the squad bay sh-t head." After I made a trip around the port and starboard sides of the squad bay I returned with the package as full as when I started. I dreaded what I thought was going to happen next, two pounds of chocolate candy crammed down my throat, asphyxiation, death, not becoming a Marine after all.

"Seeing as this is the first time this has happened, I'll keep the package as a reminder to not receive mail until I say you t-rds can receive mail, is that clear people?" he said. "Sir Yes Sir" everyone but me answered. I was having an out-of-body experience about then and it took a few seconds for the words to sink in. When I refocused my eyes he was saying "Dismissed". I stepped back, about faced, and ran faster than I ever ran before to my bunk in case he changed his mind.

Two days later somebody else wasn't so lucky when he had to eat a box of Oreos with Tide laundry detergent poured on them. Didn't take long for the upchucking to start.

By the way, I thanked my brother for sending the package of candy when he did, and he was dumbstruck! I didn't tell him I never had to eat them and I'm sure the DI's had a good time with them.

Got another boot camp story to tell, but it'll be for another time.

L/Cpl Rich Townsend
189xxxx


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #4)

I did not know that my parents had returned to the area and I was shocked to learn that they had purchased The Hemlocks. They had passed that property hundreds - maybe thousands - of times and would often comment about what a lovely place it was. I don't think they ever dreamed of someday owning it. But I am sure they had never really expected to get $464,088 for our farm either. I did not know what they had paid for The Hemlocks but Mr.'B' said it was 'an all cash transaction' and I was sure this property cost MUCH LESS than that. I could not reach my parents by phone and it was almost 2100. I told the 'Bs' that I would go over there in the morning. Mrs.'B' said "You look tired. You won't have to sleep on the sofa tonight. You can go up and sleep in Mary's bed. I am sorry that she will not be joining you - but when you get up there you will think she is there, too. Her room is permeated with the odor of her Prince Matchabelli perfume." And it sure was! This just made me miss her all the more. I slept like a log until my usual wake up time - 0500. I did not wish to disturb anyone so I just laid there and thought about going over to The Hemlocks and seeing my parents for the first time in over a year.

When I heard the 'Bs' going downstairs I got up and took my usual quick shower and got dressed. When I went downstairs Mrs.'B' asked if I would like some breakfast. I said "I'll pass again. I am sure my mother will insist on my having breakfast with them - even if I have stuffed myself here." I told the 'Bs' that I would see them again later in the day and headed over to The Hemlocks. I was sure that my parents and I had a great deal to tell each other. This trip took about 15 minutes or so. I pulled into the long, circular driveway in front of their new home - right up behind my Dad's Rocket Oldsmobile '98'. I sat there a moment and looked at this house. It must have been 60 feet long and 24 feet deep (What I could see at that time. I later learned that the middle third was about 10 or 12 feet deeper.) It was three stories high. I walked to the front door and used the large brass knocker to let them know they had a visitor. My Mom answered and my Dad was only a few steps behind her. We hugged and kissed. My Mom said "I knew you were in the area. We had been here only one day when the mail carrier delivered our first letter. He said he wasn't sure if it was for the Cecils or the new owners. It was the smallest letter I have ever seen in the U.S. Mail. It was for you. I do not know who it is from. It is postmarked from Washington, D.C. and smells like it was dipped in perfume." I knew who it was from. Mom handed it to me. The letter was only about one inch bigger in each direction than a business card. It was addressed to 'Sgt. H. T. Freas, USMC, The Hemlocks, Mt. Laurel Road, Moorestown, N.J.' I slipped it into my pocket. Mom said "Aren't you going to open it?" I said "I'll open it later." She looked a bit puzzled about this.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Smedley D. Butler's Signature

There are probably many more versions of the Marines' Hymn than most can count.

Circa 1963 a few miles West of Lawrence, Kansas. I met someone who I later found out was a Marine. We helped him and his wife escape from a tornado which appeared to be headed towards their house. It was less than 1/4 mile away when we went high port and got away. It missed their house by 100 yds. We got back to his house and found out he was a Marine too. He had participate in the second campaign of Nicaragua. He said when he got discharged from the Marines, it was the day Smedley D. Butler retired. After Gen Butler signed his discharge papers they walked out of headquarters building together. He dug out his discharge paper and there was Smedley D. Butler's signature.

He also dug out copies of the words for the Marine Corps Hymn that lamented, and described, and cussed Nicaragua. There were quite a few versus. Wish I could remember the words.

It never stops amazing me the types of stories you can hear from old Marines if you just take the time to sit a listen. I've met and talked to two Marines that participated in one of the Chinese boxer rebellions and of course this Nicaragua Marine. Most memorable one to me was one that survived the Bataan(sp) Death March.

They gave me much to live up to.

(Hoogie) Gysgt/Capt USMC (ret)
1960-1980


Apprentices Of War: Memoir Of A Marine Grunt

Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt is a book by Gary Tornes, who served as a United States Marine during the Vietnam War. He tells a vivid and memorable account of military life and the struggles of the foot Marine in Viet Nam. His story illustrates the timeless tragedy of combat that faced the American Marine of that generation. It reveals an emotional and compelling side to what a grunt's life was like on a daily basis in the jungles of Nam. And while Gary takes his readers into the combat zone of that particular war, and tells how the average Marine tried to survive the bloody and brutal challenges in southeast Asia, it's a story that any Marine from any conflict can relate to. The power packed, in-depth, detailed action of Apprentices of War will give you an insight into what he and his fellow Marines encountered and makes Gary's book hard to put down.

Get your hardback copy today at: Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt.


Then Armageddon Started

Six of us from NE Okla (Miami) joined on the 1st of Aug 1953, bussed to KC to catch a train to MCRD San Diego. We got there fairly late and rode cattle cars to the Depot. We were taken to the north side of Grinder, one of the old buildings facing it and we were put on the top floor of very large room with a total of about 100 newbies. There was a flat roof off the front of the room and we all went outside to observe our new world. A DI walking in arcade under us heard the noise and stepped out in the assumed the pose... hands on hips, sneer on mouth. After a 6-minute azs chewing, he advised us to get our stupid civilian Aszzes inside... Then Armageddon started... Supposedly some guy with a defective brain gave him the middle finger salute and then the fun began.

Before we got inside, he was upstairs and had stopped on the first floor and had gotten 3 or 4 other DI's... (assistants I suppose)... briefed them on the situation and everyone was ready... Unfortunately the guy who (reportedly) gave him the salute was wearing a blue shirt, as was I and quite a few others. Of course we got special attention... I was raised with Yes Sir and Yes Mam but some of these guys weren't and they seemed too dumb to understand that, that was required...

After about 30 minutes (seemed like hours) we were told to get into the bunks and do nothing but breathe till morning... I have no idea if this was a staged production or not but it worked...

As with everyone else in the room I wondered as I tried to go to sleep, what the h-ll; have I gotten into... but we soon found out...

Sgt Don Wackerly
1953-1956


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #5)

I had stepped inside. It seemed like I had walked into a museum. The ceilings were about 12 feet high. Seeing my Mom & Dad for the first time in over a year was a pleasure. Mom said "I want to show you around - but I want to get you some breakfast first. What can I fix for you?" I replied "ANYTHING. I have not eaten since lunch yesterday at the Midway." That made her day. She started to work on one of her huge breakfasts. I sat at the very large marble top table that she had acquired when we bought the farm in 1939. I admired the place. It was HUGE, a quite typical 'country kitchen' - about 20 feet square - but all of the kitchen appliances were modern. She fixed my usual half dozen FRESH eggs - sunny side up, scrapple, bacon, corn meal mush and my quart of milk. (I mentioned FRESH eggs because the USMC was still using cold storage eggs purchased for WWII).

Mom & Dad were anxious to show me around. The 'Living Room' and 'Sitting Room' were each about 20 by 24 ft. We went upstairs. The ceilings on the 2nd floor - with four bedrooms and two baths - were 'only' about 10 feet tall - and those on the 3rd floor with another four bedrooms and two baths were the usual 8 feet. There was an attic, too, but I did not go up there. Mrs. Cecil had left a lot of antique furniture that she had no room for in her new home. Mom loved these but had not yet decided where she would put them - and she might be selling some of them. Then we went outside to see the barn and other outbuildings. The nearest building was about the size of a standard poultry house, about 22x26 ft. It was fully enclosed with a big lock on the doors. Then there were four sheds, about 26 ft. deep, with open fronts. The total width of the four was about 100 ft. They were empty. The machinery that had at one time been stored in them was long gone. And then we were at the barn - the biggest barn I had ever seen. We went inside. It had milking stalls for 100 cows and four birthing pens. And of course an enclosed milkhouse over in one corner. I climbed the ladder to look into the haymow. It was huge and reminded me of an airplane hanger. It was empty. (If you had no cows you needed no hay) I climbed down and went over to look into the milkhouse. Then we walked towards the house. We looked at all the beautiful shrubbery and flowers that Mrs. Cecil had planted. My Dad, a born gardener, really liked these.

We walked towards the front of the house. Dad wanted to see my new Buick. He liked it. He asked "What happened to your Hudson?" I replied "I'll tell you the whole sordid story when we get back into the house. How many miles do you have on your Olds?" He said "It's just about to go over 20,000 miles." (And that was in just over a year while on one vacation around the United States) We went inside the house and sat down in the living room. I said "Now that you are sitting down, I will tell you about the demise of the Hudson. I do not know where you were on the 2nd Sunday in April, but you came within a gnats whisker of losing your youngest son."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


Taps

Whitehall, N.Y. – Joseph J."Coach" Marcino, Jr., 91, of Whitehall, died Monday, October 20, 2014 at Glens Falls Hospital surrounded by his loving family by his side following a brief illness.

He was born on May 25, 1923 in Whitehall, N.Y. the son of Joseph and Angela (Bagnacelli) Marcino. Joseph was a member of the American Legion Post #83 of Whitehall. He was also a member of Our Lady of Hope Roman Catholic Church of Whitehall. Joseph was a graduate of Whitehall High School. He then enlisted into the United States Marines Corps serving in WW II, achieving the rank of Sergeant. While serving with Company A, Fifth Tank Battalion, Fifth Marine Division on Volcano Islands on Iwo Jima on March 18, 1945, his tank became disabled forward of the enemy lines. Under heavy enemy fire, he and his crew dismounted the tank and made repairs enabling them to continue forward on their mission. For his devotion and courage, he was awarded the Bronze Star.


Short Rounds

In response to Sgt O:

In 2012 I was at a reunion of 1/9 in San Diego and we attended a graduation while there, and there were a few recruits that were graduating as not only E-2 but some E-3's.

GySgt Larry Schafer, 214xxxx
MCRDSD, platoon 361, Aug '65
Co B, 2ndAmTracBn, Camp Lejeune Jan66-Sep66
A, Co, 1/9 Oct66-Feb67 RVN
CAP-P, Feb67-Oct67 RVN
I&I, Pasadena, Calif., Nov67-Aug69


Hi Sgt.,

We all know the tradition of who gets the first and second piece of our birthday cake. I have a great idea on who should get the third piece of cake, etc. Any Marine who was born on November 10th. starting with the oldest.

Once And Always... Semper Fi!

Brian Stack
P.S. By the way I was born on November 10, 1941 :)


Grimes, get your Dod-gamned, hucking fands out of your pockets! Give me ALL of the squat thrusts in the known universe Grimes!


To "Gy Mac" about the poser: do what I did with one, retire then slap him upside the head and call him a loser. To those arguing about rank leaving boot: Anthony "Squid" Bovenvize left MCRDPICS in 1969 as an E-4, former Navy Corpsman.

Peter Dahlstrom


Gunny McMahon, the lyrics 'Admiration of the Nation' were replaced with 'First to Fight for Right and Freedom' around 1929/1930.

GySgt. P. Santiago
1946-1968


Sgt. Grit,

My suggestion to GySgt Mac. Gunny, don't waste your time and effort. However, if you insist on confronting the poser, then do it calmly and deliberately. And do it without getting physical or loud. I'll bet most of the other employees are well aware that he's lying. I'll also bet that they have little or no respect for the poser. I admire you for wanting to defend our Marine Corps and all Marines against posers whose lies make us all cringe. But he just isn't worth it, now or ever. Semper Fi - Devil Dog - Good Luck.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Here's a 55-year old quickie:

Drill on the P I grinder in 100-degree heat, our Senior D I gave us an at-ease break for the canteen and salt pills.

At the same time he dropped his trousers to square away and tuck in his shirt. Much to the whole platoon's surprise we saw that his bright and white skivvies were decorated with red hearts. (And we realized that this "monster" had a life off the drill field and was human after all!)

​MGBGYRENE


Thanks, for best coffee cup in universe,oohra!

Scott

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Quotes

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive."
--C.S. Lewis


"Freedom is not free, but the U.S. Marine Corps will pay most of your share."
--Ned Dolan


"[T]he crisis is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition, that can be heaped upon us, till custom and use shall make us as tame and abject slaves."
--George Washington (1774)


"A Marine is a Marine. I set that policy two weeks ago - there's no such thing as a former Marine. You're a Marine, just in a different uniform and you're in a different phase of your life. But you'll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico. There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps


"Life without liberty is like a body without spirit."
--Kahlil Gibran


"An honest man can feel no pleasure in the exercise of power over his fellow citizens."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1813


"What is the difference between a fairy tale and a sea story? One starts out once upon a time and the other starts out hey man this is no BULLSH-T."

"I'm so short I'm sleeping in a match box using a rifle patch for a blanket."

"Bends and mothers until you change the rotation of the earth!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 23 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Please Stay Within The Yellow Box
• Other Ranks Are But Jobs
• Sports In The Marine Corps

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36th CMC General Joseph F. Dunford

All Hail the 36th Commandant of the Marine Corps! General Joseph F. "Fighting Joe" Dunford.

Read the Commandant's message to all Marines:

Commandant's message to all Marines

Different Versions Of Marines' Hymn

Sgt Grit,

Has there ever been any type of research into how many different versions there are to The Marines' Hymn?

A little background into my request... I returned from Okinawa to San Diego in early June, 1957... married the love of my life in the Base Chapel at MCRDep on 26 June 1957 and had over 56 fantastic years with her, which ended on 25 October 2013; she is waiting for me until I report for guard duty some day.

On 31Dec13, I changed to DISH Network, and one of the features are 70+ channels of Sirius XM satellite radio; one of which is "40s on 4", mostly songs (a lot of tear-jerkers) from the WWII era. You haven't heard anything until you hear a jazz version of The Marine's Hymn by Bob Crosby (Bing's brother) and his "Bob Cats". Another band has the version in question with words, "admiration of the Nation, we're the finest ever seen, and we glory in the title 'United States Marine'", and it goes on to the wording about the Streets of Heaven being guarded by United States Marines.

Semper Fi...
James R. McMahon
GySgt of Marines (1949-1970)


2014 Sgt Grit Christmas Mugs


Please Stay Within The Yellow Box

Yellow footprints in front of escalator

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page last week. The image displays an yellow outlined box in front of an escalator containing yellow footprints and the text "Please Stay Within The Yellow Box". The image also has the comment made by Marine and Sgt Grit customer Tom Mahoney, "I refused to get on this escalator. Something told me it was some sort of magical trap that would transport me back to Parris Island. Fool me once...".

Here are a few of the comments left about this post:


B. Knight - My little brother and I used to always stray from the spot where we were supposed to wait for rides after school. My dad, a Marine SSgt. at the time, threatened to paint yellow footprints on the sidewalk. When I got to Parris Island, I saw the yellow footprints and started laughing at the memory of my dad and his threat. Not a wise move...


V. Millen Jr. - I wonder how many they picked up in the fetal position!


D. Atwood - I have 2 sets on the deck in my workshop - one for The Boy, and one for The Girl.

Kid on dad's footprints in workshop


M. Porter - Very funny... I love Sgt. Grit. Not personally, just his product line.


E. Needham - I would just bet that there's SOMEONE close to that escalator watching for Marines to see their reactions!


C. Weeks - Same thing at the Smithsonian. I went and found the stairs.


B. Seastrand - Enough said! Once is more than enough.


View more of these comment on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Other Ranks Are But Jobs

Marine Gunnery Sergeant 1918

Sgt. Grit,

In 1944 when I went to Boot Camp we were informed that in the Old Days there were Wooden Ships and Iron Men, now all they had were Iron Ships and wooden Men. I don't remember being on any wooden ships but some Wooden boats that took us to shore, course those wooden boats had slabs of steel in critical places to help stop bullets, you couldn't do any thing about the Mortar shells raining down or the Artillery shells exploding here and there. Life is hazardous in war in all kinds of places, ship or shore.

My DI had survived Guadalcanal and Tarawa and I met him later on Okinawa. He was on the ship I was on going ashore on our last Great Battle of the Pacific War. Some years Later I met him again when I had Prison Duty as they were Transferring Prisoners from Naval Prisons to Federal Prisons closer to their homes. He was a 1st Lt. again as he had been later in WWII. We had a short conversation about our past and the Future, I later learned he had retired as a Captain and was living in New Zealand with the lady he married during the War. My biggest regret is my memory isn't what it used to be and his name remains a Memory but his rank as GySgt. was probably why I always held GySgt. as the most revered of all ranks in the Marine Corps (I know some of you Punctuation Mechanic's are going to comment on how I failed to remember MSgt & MGySgt but this story ain't about them).

The only Rank I hold above Gunnery Sergeant is Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, the other ranks are but Jobs and Job Titles and I'm sure I have rattled some bones and earned the enmity of some of my peers, So be it.

Before WWI the Top Rank in the Marine Corps was Gunnery Sergeant. I have a Picture of a Marine Gunnery Sergeant 1918 and the comment on the bottom of the picture is, "The Commanding Presence and Personal Example of such Veteran NCO's enables the 4th Marine Brigade to Fight Effectively against the Most Lethal Adversaries the Corps had Ever Faced." Col. John Thompson wrote about these Men and how they led him as a Young Lieutenant through the Great War (World War 1) and a Picture of one of them is in Google and I show it here. (Image courtesy of the Marine Corps Art Collection)

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


My Car

Tet Marine rear car view

Tet Marine rear license plate bolt

Regarding the recent picture submitted by "Tee" Turner of four friends reuniting in TX after 46 years, I am the one from CT, wearing the tan "Chu Lai Vietnam" hat supplied by SGT Grit. Just thought I would send along a picture of my car, with Marine Corps pride, also supplied mostly by SGT Grit.

Jim Kiehnle
CPL of Marines
22206xx

Get Marine Corps Auto Accessories for your POV!


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My Special Creation Passed Muster

Marine holding custom ditty bag

Custom ditty bag open

Hi Sgt Grit staff,

I thought you might smile at this:

My Marine has had to travel a lot over the years as he's pursued his high-tech career. Expert at traveling light, his ditty bag was a Delta Airline's promotional that he found so practical. Unzip it like a zippered Bible and open it flat to reveal two clear plastic zippered compartments. Kept everything neat and TSA always cleared it. But its years of use showed in all the ripped plastic making it unusable.

So I decided at make him one without his knowledge. Had to measure the dying bag, figure out all the pieces, make the pattern and painstakingly determine in just what order to sew them to each other. Found my Eagle, Globe and Anchor patch and wanted to use that on the front, but didn't want it stitched on top (ala that "loving hands at home" look) and thought that if I inset it the whole bag would look more professional. HARD work! Many times during the construction I feared I would never finish it. But true to the encouraging poster I made and mounted above my computer, I improvised, I adapted, and I overcame!

He'd been out of work for 7 weeks and this Monday we went out to dinner to celebrate his brand new job which will require occasional trips from Washington State to Charleston, SC. I presented him the new shaving kit and when he unwrapped it and unzipped it he was delighted! The first words were "Wow, did you find this on Grit?!" He knows you sell really great stuff. It really raised my self-esteem to know that my special creation passed muster enough for him to think it was sold by you guys!

Keep up the good work!

Harriet Cook
Very Proud Wife and Mother of United States Marines!


USMC Muster Rolls - 1stLt George B. Batten

George B. Batten enlisted in the Marine Corps on September 16, 1914. He was accepted into the service at Philadelphia, and went through recruit training as a member of Company D, Recruit Depot, Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia. After recruit training, he served with the Marine Detachment aboard the U.S.S. New Jersey. While aboard the New Jersey, he visited ports along the East Coast and Carribean, including Navy Yard Boston; Hampton Roads, Virginia; Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Guacanayabo Bay, Cuba; Culebra, Puerto Rico; Navy Yard, Philadelphia; Newport, Rhode Island; Provincetown, Massachusetts; Charleston, South Carolina; and Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. In August 1916, Private Battan joined the 45th Company in the Dominican Republic, serving in La Cumbre and Canada Bonita. On November 8, 1916 George was promoted to Corporal. On June 8, 1917 the 45th Company became part of the 3rd Battallion, 5th Marines, and were assigned to the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). The company sailed the Atlantic for duty in France in June, 1917. On April 5, 1918 George was sent to the Army Candidates School in France. On July 31, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutentant, and assigned to Marine Corps Reserve Class 4. He then was assigned to the 1st Corps Artillery Brigade in Hosieres, France, where he participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. On November 16, 1918, he assumed command of 1st Platoon, 45th Company (Company "L") and participated in the march of the allied armies towards the Rhine River via Belgium and Luxembourg, following the evacuation of the German Army. He then marched to Waldbreitbach, Germany. On April 7, 1919 he took the oath of office as a 1st Lietentant, with a date of rank of August 18, 1918. He served in 20th Company (Company "K") as part of the Army of the Occupation at Stopperich, Germany. On June 6, 1919, he returned to the 45th Company (Company "L") as a Platoon Commander. On July 25, 1919, they embarked on the U.S.S George Washington at Brest, France for the return trip home. The 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines were deactivated on August 13, 1919.

(Data from USMC Muster Rolls)

Jerry Barrett


Banana Wars

After talking to a recently discharged Marine the other night, I got to wondering how much Marine Corps history they teach in boot camp now.

I told him that when I was in the Marine Corps League, there was a Marine who enlisted in the Corps in the 1920's, and that he was with Smedley Butler and Dan Daly in Nicaragua during the Banana Wars. He seemed to not know of what I was speaking! I'm sure there is a lot more history of the Corps now that I've been out for nearly 55 years, and maybe those times are not as important. But it was still the glory years of the Marine Corps. I was awed that two Wake Island defenders were on staff when I went through ITR.

I now wish I would have talked more to the old trooper (who was really not that old then) about what he did after December 7, 1941. He might have only been in his early thirties at that time. I know I felt that I had served my time when Viet Nam started, and was glad I couldn't be drafted. But WWII was different.

James V. Merl
1655---


Sports In The Marine Corps

Sgt. Grit,

I am the Secretary of the Quantico Marine Athletes of the Sixties. Our group was formed in 2000 to honor Marines with whom we played sports at Quantico, and who subsequently were KIA in RVN.

In today's e-mail edition of The Newsletter, Sgt Grimes touts a Cherry Hill Marines football Program. For anyone who has an interest in Marine athletics, may I suggest they click onto our website Jarheadjocks.com. Most of the information is about sports at Quantico, but this ubiquitous undertaking is mostly the handiwork of John Gunn, the legendary chronicler of Marine Athletics. Most of John's work is now in the Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, VA.

The cast of characters who played sports in the Marine Corps is truly astounding: General officers, NFL players and coaches, Hall of Fame College Coaches, Doctors, Olympic medalists, etc. Check it out next time you're surfing the net.

Semper Fi
Ron Timpanaro
091--- USMCR


Disbanded Black Berets

About 5 months ago I confronted a poser where I work. He really ticked me off and when I jumped on him I had accepted the fact that I was probably gonna loose my job. He asked me how long I was in and I told him 23 years. Don't know if it sunk in but he still continued to tell me he was in in 1968 and was in the Marine Corps Black Berets. They are the toughest of all Marines because they run 20 miles everyday before breakfast. Well the guy disappeared for a while but for the last two weeks he has been coming in daily. He sits with a Tribal Elder who is a friend of mine and just considers him a big story teller. The part that bothers me is that he is now sporting a Black Cover with a Gold Marine Corps Emblem and it says United States above and Marines below the emblem. Every night the Elder and I say good-bye to each other and this puke tries to get me to say good-bye to him. I have refused to even speak to him but it is driving me friggen nuts. I truly want to just punch this dung pile right in his pie hole but I know some one else that did just that in a bar and is now being Sued for damages. Anyone have any ideas? I only have 6 more working days in this place because I am going into full retirement and I do fully intend to verbally rip him a new azs on my way out the door but I just hate seeing him wearing that cover and trying to get everyone else to think he is some kind of war hero. By the way when I confronted him the last time he told me Nam ended at the end of 68 and they disbanded the Black Berets after that. He also told me the Black Berets had more confirmed kills than all the other units combined in Viet Nam.

Gy Mac
USMC Retired


Notre Dame And Baltimore Colts

An interesting player listed in the Marine Football Program posted by Jim Grimes is Jim Mutscheller. He graduated from Notre Dame, served two years in the Marine Corps, and was selected for the All Marine Team in 1952. Mutscheller played for the Baltimore Colts for nine years, was on the All Pro Team in 1957, and played on the 1958 and 1959 NFL Championship teams.

Bob Shannon
GySgt USMCR 1971-1984


The Football Team From Quantico

Sgt Grit,

While I was in college (College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass, Class of 1967) the football team from Quantico was actually on our football team's schedule one year. I cannot remember the specific year, but I can remember the game. The Marines from Quantico pretty much mauled the guys on our team - but at least they had the common sense not to run up the score too much!

About a year after graduating from college, I enlisted in the Corps and found myself experiencing the reality that is Parris Island. It was there that I came to understand why it is that although I had always believed that our college football team were all pretty tough guys who were in great shape, I had no concept of what it really means to be either "tough" or "in great shape".

By the way, the experience of going through Parris Island AFTER having graduated from college was "interesting" (our Drill Instructors always seemed to take a special interest in me after their review of my 201 File let them know I was a "college boy").

It was incredible to watch the process that the Corps had developed over the years (and the skill sets exhibited by the individual DI's) that transformed a diverse bunch of kids into US Marines. We had a Recruit in our Platoon who could not read or write very well. Another Recruit was assigned to him full-time to witness any document that had to be signed; the one recruit would literally put his "X" on the dotted line and the other Recruit would sign as "Witness". We even had two Recruits who were there because some judge gave them the choice of either going to jail, or joining the Military. Despite all of those challenges, our DI's accomplished the mission that the Corps assigned to them - they made Marines out of us.

And in case you were wondering - yes, prior to enlisting, I had applied for a Commission in all of the Branches of the US Military and was turned down by all of them because my eyesight was "...beyond the waiverable limits." However, since my eyesight was NOT bad enough to prevent me from getting Drafted, I decided to enlist and train with the best, rather than being Drafted into one of the "also-ran" Branches of the US Military. (P.S. About three weeks into our AIT at Camp Geiger, I was called into the Company Commander's Office and given the opportunity to apply for The Basic School at Quantico. It seemed that there was a way to get a waiver after all.)

I have managed to accomplish a thing or two in my life since then. However, very few things fill me with as much of a sense of pride and accomplishment as does the ability to say, "Yes, I am a former Marine."

Thanks for taking the time to publish this newsletter each week, and for the great selection of quality products you offer, and for your Service.

Semper Fi!

Henry ("Hank") Nocella
Former Marine


The Marines Won 69 To 0

While stationed at Quantico, Virginia in the fall of 1951 the Marine Corps Football Team was stationed there. Their quarterback was famous from graduating from Notre Dame, if my memory is correct his name was Pettibone. The Marines had the heaviest line of any team in America as the draft was on for the Korean War they drafted top players they were to play Fort Belvoir an Army team, the Marines wanted a great turn out of Marines at the game in Washington DC so you either had to go or no liberty as it was cancelled if you did not attend the game, the Marines won the game 69 to 0.

Former Marine Sgt. Phil Street


The Sailors Marching... At Best A Joke

In the 10/1/2014 edition of the newsletter there was mention of a football game in San Diego late in the year. The game was between the MCRD team and the team from Pensacola, and if memory serves me right it was sometime close to the Marine Corps birthday. I was in Plt 275 and we had just finished rifle qual at Camp Mathews and since we were going to be allowed to attend the game we rode cattle cars back to MCRD. The game was held in Balboa Stadium and I believe the team from Pensacola won. And yes the sailors marching, if that's what you want to call it, was at best a joke.

Ken Thomas
USMC '61-'66
USMCR '73-'81
1957xxx


In A Chair Going Over

I remember during the Gulf of Tonkin incident, while with the 9th Marine Reg. our 1st Lt. (I won't give his name) but he was a prior All American from some school in Texas. One day a Destroyer came along side of our ship, threw a line over and soon our Lt. was in a chair over going over to the Destroyer and on his way back to Okinawa. It appeared some General needed him for the football team. Oh for the good old days.

R/S Jim Logan 1831XXX


Spoke Derisively Of The Lifers

I wish to offer a reply to the recent comments by Gunny Hat, A Former.

Like you, I graduated from boot camp (MCRD Parris Island) fifty years ago--the month before you, in fact. Unlike you, I was a 6-month reservist. That changed less than a year later when I read about Operation Starlight. With Marines fighting and dying in Vietnam I was not content to remain a weekend warrior in Springfield, Missouri. So I went to the local recruiter and enlisted in the Regular Marine Corps. I requested that I keep the same MOS, 0311, and requested duty in Vietnam. Believe it or not, I was afraid the war would be over before I got there! Turned out they had enough time to send me over twice.

I'm not proud to admit it, but I was one of those guys who spoke derisively of the "lifers". I had cause to rethink this narrow-minded attitude toward career Marines sometime in the early 1980s when I got in touch with Tony Aguilar who was a Staff Sgt. when he was my platoon sergeant in Vietnam with Lima 3/1. Like you, Tony had served on the drill field following his second Vietnam tour. When we reunited he was the Sergeant Major of Parris Island. I cannot tell you how proud I was, and am, to have served as a squad leader for this man. I reflected on how I put guys down by calling them lifers. What would the Marine Corps be like, I realized, if there were no lifers? The answer is, there would not be one.

That said, let me address your comment about the guys you say you've met who, like me, spent their four years in and got out.

"Interestingly enough," you write, "all of them say they wish they had stayed for 20 years. And many of them are just as loyal and dedicated to the Marine Corps as they were when they were on active duty." Then you imply the only reason they, or I should say, we, di not stay in was peer pressure. Are you kidding! We had the b-lls to put our lives on the line for our fellow Marines, but could not ship over due to peer pressure?!

You are right about guys like me who are still loyal and dedicated to the Corps. But the truth is, the reason this great organization continues to work so amazingly well is because there are some, like you and Tony, who chose to dedicate their lives to it, and others, like me and a good many other Sgt. Grit subscribers, who chose to step up, earn the title U.S. Marine, and return to civilian life.

Semper Fidelis,
Gary Harlan
Proud to have been a Sergeant of Marines


Marine Tattoo Of The Week

My tattoo honoring the Marines killed in the Beirut Bombing in 1983.

Philip Alexander

Beirut Bombing Tattoo


Private Talkative And Sgt Quiet​

Grit,

We had a few funny incidents at this place - one Sgt and a private shares a cubicle - he insists on the top rack after the private makes up the bottom rack - they argue and the Sgt relents and takes the bottom one - real different people - Sgt Campbell is a hillbilly from Kentucky - and in charge of a office at Hdqrs MC - and the private is a nice guy but uneducated from Chicago - private talkative and Sgt quiet.

Private goes to Club after payday - comes back sh-t-faced and climbs into top rack fully clothed and falls asleep - at 2 or 3 a.m. he awakes leans over the rack and pukes on the Sgt who is sleeping - Sgt who is usually quiet goes nuts - and yells and screams and wakes up squad bay? A lot of us has been there and done that - so a few of us throw the private in the shower fully dressed and run the cold water on his sorry azs. Sgt also takes a shower and really relishes the discomfort of the the private.

The next morning the private wakes up to a pounding headache - he says that some little people are playing a bass drum in his head and someone is blowing a bugle too! Private goes to work and Sgt also arises and goes to work. That day after work (the Sgt is a little wiry guy and the private a big dude from the streets of Chicago) Start To Talk About The Night Before - the private tells him where to go and how to do it - and tells him he can stick his Sgt chevrons where the sun don't shine! The Sgt says I can take you to the first Sgt - __________ - let me digress for a minute - the Company A offices for Hdqrs. MC are in the barracks - so we have officers and high staff NCO's coming in and out - usually using our heads - and sometimes walking in our squad bays too - our floors are linoleum - but we have them buffed to a high shine that you can see your reflection in - very spit and polish squad bays. Now the private says to the Sgt - " F-ck You and the First Sergeant!" Just Then The First Sergeant and the Company A Commanding Officer Enter The Squad Bay And Hear This Silly Son Of A B-tch Ranting!

Bruce Bender
USMC 1963-1967
Vietnam Era Veteran


B.S. Detector Responses

Sgt Grit,

That detector should be blowing up! First, how many of you came out of boot an E-3? Really!

Get a rope...

Sgt O.


In response to Don Ryan's question in the 10/15 newsletter about whether the MOS for aircraft fires/rescue is 7000 something, the MOS is 7051. However, I have never run across a Marine that does not remember what MOS he/she held during their career. Or a Viet Nam vet that cannot remember where he/she served in country.

MG


To continue the MOS for that slot is:

7051/Aircraft Crash, Fire and Rescue Man

So that much might be true, but he would have been based at a airfield, not out on LZ's something is wrong somewhere.

Semper Fi
Wayne Ingram
MCRD San Diego 1969, 1970 - Medical out due to being hit by a car. "A toast to our Country, a toast to our fallen, a toast to our past, a toast to our present and a toast to our future... and a toast to Chesty, wherever you are!"


In response to Don Ryan's request about Marine Corps MOS Numbers. He can find a complete list of Milirary Occupational Specialty (MOS) for the Marine Corps at the web site, List of United States Marine Corps MOS. To answer his question about aviation fire/rescue, the Marine Corps' MOS is 7051 Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting. Hope this helps.

Semper Fi,
Bob Applegarth, Sgt., 1965-1971
6511 Aviation Ordnance


I just wanted to provide the information to Don Ray about the Aircraft fire/rescue MOS. I googled it and the MOS number that came up was 7051 Aircraft Fire Rescue/Firefighting Specialist. Basically this is the Crash Crew. I did find that you must past a medical and OSHA requirements for fire fighting.

This is a job that I would not want. I had to go to a ship board firefighting school before being deployed aboard the USS Midway (CV-41) from July 1982 to January 1983. Was pulled off on emergency Leave before the end of the deployment (6 Month).

Dennis Beach
Sgt.
MCTSSA/2nd Medical Bn./25th Staff Group/HAMS-11/VMFP-3
1973-1984


To Don Ryan. As an old air winger I do remember the MOS for aircraft fire/rescue was 7051. I would however question his response of LZ's to the question as to where he served while in Nam.

Paul Kelly
Sgt. of Marines
HML 167
1968 - 1974


List of United States Marines Corps MOS 7000 Airfield Services

Don Ryan asked about MOS's. A 7051 is fire and rescue. Check the above for any others.

I agree that we have a lot of pretenders, and yes some of them were actual marines (small "m") who like to blow smoke when they can get away with it. I remember as a very young and inexperenced brown bar at how impressed I was with some of the stories that certain staff NCO's, who were not that long back from Korea, enjoyed telling. And I am sure there was a lot of truth in some of the stories, but surely not all. Hey, if it starts getting too deep, ask them where they keep the shovel so that you wont drown in it.

Joe Sanders
Maj USMC (ret)


Sgt. Grit,

In response to Don Ryan in his letter about "B.S. Detector Ain't Broke" here is a listing of all the Vietnam era MOS's:

http://www.lzrussell.org/misc/mos/

From this list: MOS 7051 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Specialist. Whether the guy Don is talking about was one or not is a different story. Also I don't think anyone was making L/Cpl out of boot in 1969.

Tom Tilque
Cpl USMC 1969-73
2554xxx MOS 2531/0431

Plt 2108, MCRD San Diego, CA (1969)
Fox Co, 2nd ITR, Camp Pendleton, CA (1969)
C&E Bn, MCRD San Diego, CA (1969)
Hq Co.(Nucleus), 4th Mar Div., Camp Pendleton (1970)
Hq & Hotel Btry, 3/12 Okinawa & Vietnam (1970-72)
Hq Btry, 4/11 MCB, 29 Palms, CA (1972-73)


The MOS of Crash Fire/Rescue is 7051 Proudly served in YUMA, AZ, 1987-1993.

I can't see any truth in this story as when we are deployed we are a support group that rescues pilots and personnel from aircraft crashes and emergencies, and even in country would be stationed on base and would only go to crash sites if warranted. (we are nicknamed Krispy Kritters because of our jobs, but Most times when we are upon a crash, the pilot has ejected and we surround and drown the burning aircraft.)

The first Live Rescue of any pilot from a crash (egress out of airplane) was from a harrier jet at YUMA in Summer of 1992 on a Friday the 13th, and I believe it was documented as the First Live rescue in something like 45 years at that time, (which would bring it before the vietnam war).

So yeah, I call that the BS detector was flaming hot!


Triggers

TRIGGERS: Once again the trigger has been squeezed. I'm sitting here on my 72nd birthday remembering mail call on my 18th one in Boot Camp. I received about 15 letters that day and had to leave formation and run front and center for each letter. I must have done 100 pushups that day for all the sh-t that was written on the outside of the envelopes (I had told everyone NOT to write anything on the outside!). My cousin who was with 3/5 at Chosin wrote on his (he knew what he was doing) RTDIIY BF. My DI asked me if I knew what that meant and I responded "Sir, yes Sir it means "Remember the Drill Instructor is your best friend", I got thumped for that. I had around 6 or seven girls I knew writing to me at the time and the Drill Instructors referred to me as "United Nations" because one had a German name, one Polish, one Armenian, one Belgian, one Hispanic, one Hungarian, etc. etc. (no CPL. Howard Hada, Lois wasn't one of them because remember your Step Dad said I wasn't allowed to talk to her). That was a very long mail call for me and I might not have been smiling on the out side but I sure was on the inside!

The other "trigger" was a football game played at Aztec stadium (San Diego State vs MCRD I think) in the last part of '60. Not sure how many of us were taken there by cattle car but it had to be several series. One of the male cheerleaders came over to lead us in a cheer but there wasn't much enthusiasm on our part, that's when several DI's stood and told us that if we didn't cheer we would pay for it later back at MCRD! I still remember the look on that cheerleaders face when we gave out the next cheer, I'm pretty sure the game stopped because of it, and they could have heard us in San Diego. Ah, to be in such a motivated group again!

SGT. Grit, Just the facts Ma'am. SGT. Joe Friday.

CPL. Seledrs

P.S. SGT. Rossi pointed out to me a long time ago that the only time you're an "X" Marine is when the X's are over your eyes.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #3)

I shall digress to explain the very last part of my previous letter. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered that production of passenger cars would be halted and the assembly lines would be converted to production of items for the military. In early 1942 gasoline was rationed for all civilian consumption. The limit for a private car was 3 gallons per week with an 'A' sticker; 8 gallons per week with a 'B' sticker (for those who had to commute to a war related job) or 5 gallons at a time with a 'C' sticker (These were unlimited and issued to police and fire personnel, doctors and farmers). You had to have a sticker on your windshield to buy any gas. When WWII ended so did gas rationing and people could again say 'Fill it up' and go wherever they wished. Soon new cars were coming off the lines. People had been able to save a lot of money during the war and were now taking trips to places they had never thought of going before. The roads were clogged. The New Castle - Pennsville ferry - between Delaware and New Jersey - was a major problem. The waiting time on either side was usually three to five hours. Delaware was the first to recognize this and decided to build a bridge between those two cities. They had the money and were able to complete the job within about two years. They named it the 'Delaware Memorial Bridge' to honor those who had served in WWII and did not survive. The construction of this bridge was going to place a burden on the road system of New Jersey which had nothing to gain because they felt that those who crossed the bridge were headed for New York City or New England - not Jersey. They got their heads together and soon placed articles in the local press showing a map of New Jersey with an almost straight line on it between Pennsville and N.Y.C. They said "If your property lies within 150 feet of this line it is in jeopardy of being acquired by the state for construction of the proposed New Jersey Turnpike." This became a topic of conversation - and lawsuits - for more than three years. You could not get a haircut without everyone in the barber shop voicing their opinion of this proposal. I lived quite close to the line but we were not involved. A nearby farmer by the name of 'Cecil' owned a 105 acre property that was to be cut in two. He took it very philosophically. He did not contest it. But in the end he was left with his 60 year old homestead, his barn and a half dozen other buildings on one side of the Turnpike and all of his pastures taken by the state or left on the other side of the road.

His only access to the pastures was to go about 12 miles north and through an underpass and go south 12 miles. And of course he was not able to move his cattle between his barn and the pastures. He sold his cattle and the acreage on the other side of the highway and decided to live out his life in the house that had been built in about 1890 on property his family had owned for more than 100 years. He passed away just a couple of years later and left his elderly widow and a grown son living in a three story home of simply humongous proportions.

My parents returned from vacation while I was in O.C. and went to the Cedar Lodge. They asked the owner if she could refer them to a realtor. - Mr. B's firm was right across the street.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Grabasstic Patrol Up A Creek

BAT plt and Flame plt Marines

The Gun Club, assembled in the gulch. (Actually, 106RR or "BAT" Platoon (Battalion Anti-Tank) and Flame Platoon, combined)... H&S 2/1/9 in the Northern Training Area of Okinawa, 1959). Since our recoilless rifles and Jeeps had not caught up with us yet, we were used as the Bn Aggressor Force. The rifle companies would come up to the NTA one at a time from Sukiran to find/engage us... and, since the boondocks were our 'home court', the second and later companies really didn't have a chance... This is kinda old Corps... M-1's, M1919A4 air-cooled .30 Cal Brownings, herringbone utilities, and in this picture, the old green woolen shirts, as aggressor uniform. Since no blanks had been invented for the Flame Thrower (M2), the Flame guys usually got to be machine gun crew... most of either team having the M1911A1 .45cal pistol as sidearms. We were camping out up there for multiple weeks... got hot chow once most days, and some kick-back time when between companies... I recall an all-NCO grabasstic patrol up a creek... or maybe it should have been called 'swim call'?, as we were all buck nekkid, doing the Tarzan bit with vines, etc... until one of us realized that if somebody got seriously hurt, we were all in deep kimchi... In this picture, over half a century later, I can identify, among other trades, a surgeon, a feddle gubmint landscape architect, a mortgage broker, several law enforcement officers, and more than one career Marine... (buncha dumb-ss grunts, anyway...)

Ddick


Reunions

Marines of Plt 1229, 1970 MCRD San Diego Reunite

Got together with 3 guys I was in Boot Camp with while on a business trip to Louisiana. I have not seen these Marines since March 7, 1970 when we left MCRD San Diego for ITR at Camp Pendelton. Myself and Pvt Randall Axelsen immediately went to Infantry training while the rest of Platoon 1229 enjoyed a couple of week of Mess and Maintenance duty. We got together in LaPlace, LA.

Left to Right Sgt. Jim Grimes, Sgt. Mike Hinds, W05 Mike Anthony, and SSgt Jewell Cazes.

We are planning a reunion next year in Branson, Missouri. If you know of anyone from our Platoon please let me know.

Sgt. Jim Grimes 1969-72

P.S. note the horizontal alignment.


Short Rounds

Marine Survives Sniper Headshot By Inches In Afghanistan.

See video at: Marine Survives Sniper Headshot


Quotes

"All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting."
--George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia​


"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a h-ll of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it's quite fun to fight them, you know. It's a h-ll of a hoot. It's fun to shoot some people. I'll be right up there with you. I like brawling."
--Gen. James Mattis


"I come in peace. I didn't bring artillery. But I'm pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you f-ck with me, I'll kill you all."
--Gen. James Mattis


"There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion."
--Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army


"I can't hear you." "Get your footlockers over your heads."

"We dig fighting holes....not 'foxholes'....foxes use theirs to f-ckin'... ours are for fighting."

"The smoking lamp is lit for one. Guide, light it and pass it around."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 23 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Please Stay Within The Yellow Box
• Other Ranks Are But Jobs
• Sports In The Marine Corps

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Different Versions Of Marines' Hymn

Sgt Grit,

Has there ever been any type of research into how many different versions there are to The Marines' Hymn?

A little background into my request... I returned from Okinawa to San Diego in early June, 1957... married the love of my life in the Base Chapel at MCRDep on 26 June 1957 and had over 56 fantastic years with her, which ended on 25 October 2013; she is waiting for me until I report for guard duty some day.

On 31Dec13, I changed to DISH Network, and one of the features are 70+ channels of Sirius XM satellite radio; one of which is "40s on 4", mostly songs (a lot of tear-jerkers) from the WWII era. You haven't heard anything until you hear a jazz version of The Marine's Hymn by Bob Crosby (Bing's brother) and his "Bob Cats". Another band has the version in question with words, "admiration of the Nation, we're the finest ever seen, and we glory in the title 'United States Marine'", and it goes on to the wording about the Streets of Heaven being guarded by United States Marines.

Semper Fi...
James R. McMahon
GySgt of Marines (1949-1970)


Please Stay Within The Yellow Box

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page last week. The image displays an yellow outlined box in front of an escalator containing yellow footprints and the text "Please Stay Within The Yellow Box". The image also has the comment made by Marine and Sgt Grit customer Tom Mahoney, "I refused to get on this escalator. Something told me it was some sort of magical trap that would transport me back to Parris Island. Fool me once...".

Here are a few of the comments left about this post:


B. Knight - My little brother and I used to always stray from the spot where we were supposed to wait for rides after school. My dad, a Marine SSgt. at the time, threatened to paint yellow footprints on the sidewalk. When I got to Parris Island, I saw the yellow footprints and started laughing at the memory of my dad and his threat. Not a wise move...


V. Millen Jr. - I wonder how many they picked up in the fetal position!


D. Atwood - I have 2 sets on the deck in my workshop - one for The Boy, and one for The Girl.


M. Porter - Very funny... I love Sgt. Grit. Not personally, just his product line.


E. Needham - I would just bet that there's SOMEONE close to that escalator watching for Marines to see their reactions!


C. Weeks - Same thing at the Smithsonian. I went and found the stairs.


B. Seastrand - Enough said! Once is more than enough.


View more of these comment on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Other Ranks Are But Jobs

Sgt. Grit,

In 1944 when I went to Boot Camp we were informed that in the Old Days there were Wooden Ships and Iron Men, now all they had were Iron Ships and wooden Men. I don't remember being on any wooden ships but some Wooden boats that took us to shore, course those wooden boats had slabs of steel in critical places to help stop bullets, you couldn't do any thing about the Mortar shells raining down or the Artillery shells exploding here and there. Life is hazardous in war in all kinds of places, ship or shore.

My DI had survived Guadalcanal and Tarawa and I met him later on Okinawa. He was on the ship I was on going ashore on our last Great Battle of the Pacific War. Some years Later I met him again when I had Prison Duty as they were Transferring Prisoners from Naval Prisons to Federal Prisons closer to their homes. He was a 1st Lt. again as he had been later in WWII. We had a short conversation about our past and the Future, I later learned he had retired as a Captain and was living in New Zealand with the lady he married during the War. My biggest regret is my memory isn't what it used to be and his name remains a Memory but his rank as GySgt. was probably why I always held GySgt. as the most revered of all ranks in the Marine Corps (I know some of you Punctuation Mechanic's are going to comment on how I failed to remember MSgt & MGySgt but this story ain't about them).

The only Rank I hold above Gunnery Sergeant is Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, the other ranks are but Jobs and Job Titles and I'm sure I have rattled some bones and earned the enmity of some of my peers, So be it.

Before WWI the Top Rank in the Marine Corps was Gunnery Sergeant. I have a Picture of a Marine Gunnery Sergeant 1918 and the comment on the bottom of the picture is, "The Commanding Presence and Personal Example of such Veteran NCO's enables the 4th Marine Brigade to Fight Effectively against the Most Lethal Adversaries the Corps had Ever Faced." Col. John Thompson wrote about these Men and how they led him as a Young Lieutenant through the Great War (World War 1) and a Picture of one of them is in Google and I show it here. (Image courtesy of the Marine Corps Art Collection)

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


My Car

Regarding the recent picture submitted by "Tee" Turner of four friends reuniting in TX after 46 years, I am the one from CT, wearing the tan "Chu Lai Vietnam" hat supplied by SGT Grit. Just thought I would send along a picture of my car, with Marine Corps pride, also supplied mostly by SGT Grit.

Jim Kiehnle
CPL of Marines
22206xx

Get Marine Corps Auto Accessories for your POV!


My Special Creation Passed Muster

Hi Sgt Grit staff,

I thought you might smile at this:

My Marine has had to travel a lot over the years as he's pursued his high-tech career. Expert at traveling light, his ditty bag was a Delta Airline's promotional that he found so practical. Unzip it like a zippered Bible and open it flat to reveal two clear plastic zippered compartments. Kept everything neat and TSA always cleared it. But its years of use showed in all the ripped plastic making it unusable.

So I decided at make him one without his knowledge. Had to measure the dying bag, figure out all the pieces, make the pattern and painstakingly determine in just what order to sew them to each other. Found my Eagle, Globe and Anchor patch and wanted to use that on the front, but didn't want it stitched on top (ala that "loving hands at home" look) and thought that if I inset it the whole bag would look more professional. HARD work! Many times during the construction I feared I would never finish it. But true to the encouraging poster I made and mounted above my computer, I improvised, I adapted, and I overcame!

He'd been out of work for 7 weeks and this Monday we went out to dinner to celebrate his brand new job which will require occasional trips from Washington State to Charleston, SC. I presented him the new shaving kit and when he unwrapped it and unzipped it he was delighted! The first words were "Wow, did you find this on Grit?!" He knows you sell really great stuff. It really raised my self-esteem to know that my special creation passed muster enough for him to think it was sold by you guys!

Keep up the good work!

Harriet Cook
Very Proud Wife and Mother of United States Marines!


USMC Muster Rolls - 1stLt George B. Batten

George B. Batten enlisted in the Marine Corps on September 16, 1914. He was accepted into the service at Philadelphia, and went through recruit training as a member of Company D, Recruit Depot, Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia. After recruit training, he served with the Marine Detachment aboard the U.S.S. New Jersey. While aboard the New Jersey, he visited ports along the East Coast and Carribean, including Navy Yard Boston; Hampton Roads, Virginia; Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Guacanayabo Bay, Cuba; Culebra, Puerto Rico; Navy Yard, Philadelphia; Newport, Rhode Island; Provincetown, Massachusetts; Charleston, South Carolina; and Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. In August 1916, Private Battan joined the 45th Company in the Dominican Republic, serving in La Cumbre and Canada Bonita. On November 8, 1916 George was promoted to Corporal. On June 8, 1917 the 45th Company became part of the 3rd Battallion, 5th Marines, and were assigned to the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). The company sailed the Atlantic for duty in France in June, 1917. On April 5, 1918 George was sent to the Army Candidates School in France. On July 31, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutentant, and assigned to Marine Corps Reserve Class 4. He then was assigned to the 1st Corps Artillery Brigade in Hosieres, France, where he participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. On November 16, 1918, he assumed command of 1st Platoon, 45th Company (Company "L") and participated in the march of the allied armies towards the Rhine River via Belgium and Luxembourg, following the evacuation of the German Army. He then marched to Waldbreitbach, Germany. On April 7, 1919 he took the oath of office as a 1st Lietentant, with a date of rank of August 18, 1918. He served in 20th Company (Company "K") as part of the Army of the Occupation at Stopperich, Germany. On June 6, 1919, he returned to the 45th Company (Company "L") as a Platoon Commander. On July 25, 1919, they embarked on the U.S.S George Washington at Brest, France for the return trip home. The 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines were deactivated on August 13, 1919.

(Data from USMC Muster Rolls)

Jerry Barrett


Banana Wars

After talking to a recently discharged Marine the other night, I got to wondering how much Marine Corps history they teach in boot camp now.

I told him that when I was in the Marine Corps League, there was a Marine who enlisted in the Corps in the 1920's, and that he was with Smedley Butler and Dan Daly in Nicaragua during the Banana Wars. He seemed to not know of what I was speaking! I'm sure there is a lot more history of the Corps now that I've been out for nearly 55 years, and maybe those times are not as important. But it was still the glory years of the Marine Corps. I was awed that two Wake Island defenders were on staff when I went through ITR.

I now wish I would have talked more to the old trooper (who was really not that old then) about what he did after December 7, 1941. He might have only been in his early thirties at that time. I know I felt that I had served my time when Viet Nam started, and was glad I couldn't be drafted. But WWII was different.

James V. Merl
1655---


Sports In The Marine Corps

Sgt. Grit,

I am the Secretary of the Quantico Marine Athletes of the Sixties. Our group was formed in 2000 to honor Marines with whom we played sports at Quantico, and who subsequently were KIA in RVN.

In today's e-mail edition of The Newsletter, Sgt Grimes touts a Cherry Hill Marines football Program. For anyone who has an interest in Marine athletics, may I suggest they click onto our website Jarheadjocks.com. Most of the information is about sports at Quantico, but this ubiquitous undertaking is mostly the handiwork of John Gunn, the legendary chronicler of Marine Athletics. Most of John's work is now in the Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, VA.

The cast of characters who played sports in the Marine Corps is truly astounding: General officers, NFL players and coaches, Hall of Fame College Coaches, Doctors, Olympic medalists, etc. Check it out next time you're surfing the net.

Semper Fi
Ron Timpanaro
091--- USMCR


Disbanded Black Berets

About 5 months ago I confronted a poser where I work. He really ticked me off and when I jumped on him I had accepted the fact that I was probably gonna loose my job. He asked me how long I was in and I told him 23 years. Don't know if it sunk in but he still continued to tell me he was in in 1968 and was in the Marine Corps Black Berets. They are the toughest of all Marines because they run 20 miles everyday before breakfast. Well the guy disappeared for a while but for the last two weeks he has been coming in daily. He sits with a Tribal Elder who is a friend of mine and just considers him a big story teller. The part that bothers me is that he is now sporting a Black Cover with a Gold Marine Corps Emblem and it says United States above and Marines below the emblem. Every night the Elder and I say good-bye to each other and this puke tries to get me to say good-bye to him. I have refused to even speak to him but it is driving me friggen nuts. I truly want to just punch this dung pile right in his pie hole but I know some one else that did just that in a bar and is now being Sued for damages. Anyone have any ideas? I only have 6 more working days in this place because I am going into full retirement and I do fully intend to verbally rip him a new azs on my way out the door but I just hate seeing him wearing that cover and trying to get everyone else to think he is some kind of war hero. By the way when I confronted him the last time he told me Nam ended at the end of 68 and they disbanded the Black Berets after that. He also told me the Black Berets had more confirmed kills than all the other units combined in Viet Nam.

Gy Mac
USMC Retired


Notre Dame And Baltimore Colts

An interesting player listed in the Marine Football Program posted by Jim Grimes is Jim Mutscheller. He graduated from Notre Dame, served two years in the Marine Corps, and was selected for the All Marine Team in 1952. Mutscheller played for the Baltimore Colts for nine years, was on the All Pro Team in 1957, and played on the 1958 and 1959 NFL Championship teams.

Bob Shannon
GySgt USMCR 1971-1984


The Football Team From Quantico

Sgt Grit,

While I was in college (College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass, Class of 1967) the football team from Quantico was actually on our football team's schedule one year. I cannot remember the specific year, but I can remember the game. The Marines from Quantico pretty much mauled the guys on our team - but at least they had the common sense not to run up the score too much!

About a year after graduating from college, I enlisted in the Corps and found myself experiencing the reality that is Parris Island. It was there that I came to understand why it is that although I had always believed that our college football team were all pretty tough guys who were in great shape, I had no concept of what it really means to be either "tough" or "in great shape".

By the way, the experience of going through Parris Island AFTER having graduated from college was "interesting" (our Drill Instructors always seemed to take a special interest in me after their review of my 201 File let them know I was a "college boy").

It was incredible to watch the process that the Corps had developed over the years (and the skill sets exhibited by the individual DI's) that transformed a diverse bunch of kids into US Marines. We had a Recruit in our Platoon who could not read or write very well. Another Recruit was assigned to him full-time to witness any document that had to be signed; the one recruit would literally put his "X" on the dotted line and the other Recruit would sign as "Witness". We even had two Recruits who were there because some judge gave them the choice of either going to jail, or joining the Military. Despite all of those challenges, our DI's accomplished the mission that the Corps assigned to them - they made Marines out of us.

And in case you were wondering - yes, prior to enlisting, I had applied for a Commission in all of the Branches of the US Military and was turned down by all of them because my eyesight was "...beyond the waiverable limits." However, since my eyesight was NOT bad enough to prevent me from getting Drafted, I decided to enlist and train with the best, rather than being Drafted into one of the "also-ran" Branches of the US Military. (P.S. About three weeks into our AIT at Camp Geiger, I was called into the Company Commander's Office and given the opportunity to apply for The Basic School at Quantico. It seemed that there was a way to get a waiver after all.)

I have managed to accomplish a thing or two in my life since then. However, very few things fill me with as much of a sense of pride and accomplishment as does the ability to say, "Yes, I am a former Marine."

Thanks for taking the time to publish this newsletter each week, and for the great selection of quality products you offer, and for your Service.

Semper Fi!

Henry ("Hank") Nocella
Former Marine


The Marines Won 69 To 0

While stationed at Quantico, Virginia in the fall of 1951 the Marine Corps Football Team was stationed there. Their quarterback was famous from graduating from Notre Dame, if my memory is correct his name was Pettibone. The Marines had the heaviest line of any team in America as the draft was on for the Korean War they drafted top players they were to play Fort Belvoir an Army team, the Marines wanted a great turn out of Marines at the game in Washington DC so you either had to go or no liberty as it was cancelled if you did not attend the game, the Marines won the game 69 to 0.

Former Marine Sgt. Phil Street


The Sailors Marching... At Best A Joke

In the 10/1/2014 edition of the newsletter there was mention of a football game in San Diego late in the year. The game was between the MCRD team and the team from Pensacola, and if memory serves me right it was sometime close to the Marine Corps birthday. I was in Plt 275 and we had just finished rifle qual at Camp Mathews and since we were going to be allowed to attend the game we rode cattle cars back to MCRD. The game was held in Balboa Stadium and I believe the team from Pensacola won. And yes the sailors marching, if that's what you want to call it, was at best a joke.

Ken Thomas
USMC '61-'66
USMCR '73-'81
1957xxx


In A Chair Going Over

I remember during the Gulf of Tonkin incident, while with the 9th Marine Reg. our 1st Lt. (I won't give his name) but he was a prior All American from some school in Texas. One day a Destroyer came along side of our ship, threw a line over and soon our Lt. was in a chair over going over to the Destroyer and on his way back to Okinawa. It appeared some General needed him for the football team. Oh for the good old days.

R/S Jim Logan 1831XXX


Spoke Derisively Of The Lifers

I wish to offer a reply to the recent comments by Gunny Hat, A Former.

Like you, I graduated from boot camp (MCRD Parris Island) fifty years ago--the month before you, in fact. Unlike you, I was a 6-month reservist. That changed less than a year later when I read about Operation Starlight. With Marines fighting and dying in Vietnam I was not content to remain a weekend warrior in Springfield, Missouri. So I went to the local recruiter and enlisted in the Regular Marine Corps. I requested that I keep the same MOS, 0311, and requested duty in Vietnam. Believe it or not, I was afraid the war would be over before I got there! Turned out they had enough time to send me over twice.

I'm not proud to admit it, but I was one of those guys who spoke derisively of the "lifers". I had cause to rethink this narrow-minded attitude toward career Marines sometime in the early 1980s when I got in touch with Tony Aguilar who was a Staff Sgt. when he was my platoon sergeant in Vietnam with Lima 3/1. Like you, Tony had served on the drill field following his second Vietnam tour. When we reunited he was the Sergeant Major of Parris Island. I cannot tell you how proud I was, and am, to have served as a squad leader for this man. I reflected on how I put guys down by calling them lifers. What would the Marine Corps be like, I realized, if there were no lifers? The answer is, there would not be one.

That said, let me address your comment about the guys you say you've met who, like me, spent their four years in and got out.

"Interestingly enough," you write, "all of them say they wish they had stayed for 20 years. And many of them are just as loyal and dedicated to the Marine Corps as they were when they were on active duty." Then you imply the only reason they, or I should say, we, di not stay in was peer pressure. Are you kidding! We had the b-lls to put our lives on the line for our fellow Marines, but could not ship over due to peer pressure?!

You are right about guys like me who are still loyal and dedicated to the Corps. But the truth is, the reason this great organization continues to work so amazingly well is because there are some, like you and Tony, who chose to dedicate their lives to it, and others, like me and a good many other Sgt. Grit subscribers, who chose to step up, earn the title U.S. Marine, and return to civilian life.

Semper Fidelis,
Gary Harlan
Proud to have been a Sergeant of Marines


Marine Tattoo Of The Week

My tattoo honoring the Marines killed in the Beirut Bombing in 1983.

Philip Alexander


Private Talkative And Sgt Quiet​

Grit,

We had a few funny incidents at this place - one Sgt and a private shares a cubicle - he insists on the top rack after the private makes up the bottom rack - they argue and the Sgt relents and takes the bottom one - real different people - Sgt Campbell is a hillbilly from Kentucky - and in charge of a office at Hdqrs MC - and the private is a nice guy but uneducated from Chicago - private talkative and Sgt quiet.

Private goes to Club after payday - comes back sh-t-faced and climbs into top rack fully clothed and falls asleep - at 2 or 3 a.m. he awakes leans over the rack and pukes on the Sgt who is sleeping - Sgt who is usually quiet goes nuts - and yells and screams and wakes up squad bay? A lot of us has been there and done that - so a few of us throw the private in the shower fully dressed and run the cold water on his sorry azs. Sgt also takes a shower and really relishes the discomfort of the the private.

The next morning the private wakes up to a pounding headache - he says that some little people are playing a bass drum in his head and someone is blowing a bugle too! Private goes to work and Sgt also arises and goes to work. That day after work (the Sgt is a little wiry guy and the private a big dude from the streets of Chicago) Start To Talk About The Night Before - the private tells him where to go and how to do it - and tells him he can stick his Sgt chevrons where the sun don't shine! The Sgt says I can take you to the first Sgt - __________ - let me digress for a minute - the Company A offices for Hdqrs. MC are in the barracks - so we have officers and high staff NCO's coming in and out - usually using our heads - and sometimes walking in our squad bays too - our floors are linoleum - but we have them buffed to a high shine that you can see your reflection in - very spit and polish squad bays. Now the private says to the Sgt - " F-ck You and the First Sergeant!" Just Then The First Sergeant and the Company A Commanding Officer Enter The Squad Bay And Hear This Silly Son Of A B-tch Ranting!

Bruce Bender
USMC 1963-1967
Vietnam Era Veteran


B.S. Detector Responses

Sgt Grit,

That detector should be blowing up! First, how many of you came out of boot an E-3? Really!

Get a rope...

Sgt O.


In response to Don Ryan's question in the 10/15 newsletter about whether the MOS for aircraft fires/rescue is 7000 something, the MOS is 7051. However, I have never run across a Marine that does not remember what MOS he/she held during their career. Or a Viet Nam vet that cannot remember where he/she served in country.

MG


To continue the MOS for that slot is:

7051/Aircraft Crash, Fire and Rescue Man

So that much might be true, but he would have been based at a airfield, not out on LZ's something is wrong somewhere.

Semper Fi
Wayne Ingram
MCRD San Diego 1969, 1970 - Medical out due to being hit by a car. "A toast to our Country, a toast to our fallen, a toast to our past, a toast to our present and a toast to our future... and a toast to Chesty, wherever you are!"


In response to Don Ryan's request about Marine Corps MOS Numbers. He can find a complete list of Milirary Occupational Specialty (MOS) for the Marine Corps at the web site, List of United States Marine Corps MOS. To answer his question about aviation fire/rescue, the Marine Corps' MOS is 7051 Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting. Hope this helps.

Semper Fi,
Bob Applegarth, Sgt., 1965-1971
6511 Aviation Ordnance


I just wanted to provide the information to Don Ray about the Aircraft fire/rescue MOS. I googled it and the MOS number that came up was 7051 Aircraft Fire Rescue/Firefighting Specialist. Basically this is the Crash Crew. I did find that you must past a medical and OSHA requirements for fire fighting.

This is a job that I would not want. I had to go to a ship board firefighting school before being deployed aboard the USS Midway (CV-41) from July 1982 to January 1983. Was pulled off on emergency Leave before the end of the deployment (6 Month).

Dennis Beach
Sgt.
MCTSSA/2nd Medical Bn./25th Staff Group/HAMS-11/VMFP-3
1973-1984


To Don Ryan. As an old air winger I do remember the MOS for aircraft fire/rescue was 7051. I would however question his response of LZ's to the question as to where he served while in Nam.

Paul Kelly
Sgt. of Marines
HML 167
1968 - 1974


List of United States Marines Corps MOS 7000 Airfield Services

Don Ryan asked about MOS's. A 7051 is fire and rescue. Check the above for any others.

I agree that we have a lot of pretenders, and yes some of them were actual marines (small "m") who like to blow smoke when they can get away with it. I remember as a very young and inexperenced brown bar at how impressed I was with some of the stories that certain staff NCO's, who were not that long back from Korea, enjoyed telling. And I am sure there was a lot of truth in some of the stories, but surely not all. Hey, if it starts getting too deep, ask them where they keep the shovel so that you wont drown in it.

Joe Sanders
Maj USMC (ret)


Sgt. Grit,

In response to Don Ryan in his letter about "B.S. Detector Ain't Broke" here is a listing of all the Vietnam era MOS's:

http://www.lzrussell.org/misc/mos/

From this list: MOS 7051 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Specialist. Whether the guy Don is talking about was one or not is a different story. Also I don't think anyone was making L/Cpl out of boot in 1969.

Tom Tilque
Cpl USMC 1969-73
2554xxx MOS 2531/0431

Plt 2108, MCRD San Diego, CA (1969)
Fox Co, 2nd ITR, Camp Pendleton, CA (1969)
C&E Bn, MCRD San Diego, CA (1969)
Hq Co.(Nucleus), 4th Mar Div., Camp Pendleton (1970)
Hq & Hotel Btry, 3/12 Okinawa & Vietnam (1970-72)
Hq Btry, 4/11 MCB, 29 Palms, CA (1972-73)


The MOS of Crash Fire/Rescue is 7051 Proudly served in YUMA, AZ, 1987-1993.

I can't see any truth in this story as when we are deployed we are a support group that rescues pilots and personnel from aircraft crashes and emergencies, and even in country would be stationed on base and would only go to crash sites if warranted. (we are nicknamed Krispy Kritters because of our jobs, but Most times when we are upon a crash, the pilot has ejected and we surround and drown the burning aircraft.)

The first Live Rescue of any pilot from a crash (egress out of airplane) was from a harrier jet at YUMA in Summer of 1992 on a Friday the 13th, and I believe it was documented as the First Live rescue in something like 45 years at that time, (which would bring it before the vietnam war).

So yeah, I call that the BS detector was flaming hot!


Triggers

TRIGGERS: Once again the trigger has been squeezed. I'm sitting here on my 72nd birthday remembering mail call on my 18th one in Boot Camp. I received about 15 letters that day and had to leave formation and run front and center for each letter. I must have done 100 pushups that day for all the sh-t that was written on the outside of the envelopes (I had told everyone NOT to write anything on the outside!). My cousin who was with 3/5 at Chosin wrote on his (he knew what he was doing) RTDIIY BF. My DI asked me if I knew what that meant and I responded "Sir, yes Sir it means "Remember the Drill Instructor is your best friend", I got thumped for that. I had around 6 or seven girls I knew writing to me at the time and the Drill Instructors referred to me as "United Nations" because one had a German name, one Polish, one Armenian, one Belgian, one Hispanic, one Hungarian, etc. etc. (no CPL. Howard Hada, Lois wasn't one of them because remember your Step Dad said I wasn't allowed to talk to her). That was a very long mail call for me and I might not have been smiling on the out side but I sure was on the inside!

The other "trigger" was a football game played at Aztec stadium (San Diego State vs MCRD I think) in the last part of '60. Not sure how many of us were taken there by cattle car but it had to be several series. One of the male cheerleaders came over to lead us in a cheer but there wasn't much enthusiasm on our part, that's when several DI's stood and told us that if we didn't cheer we would pay for it later back at MCRD! I still remember the look on that cheerleaders face when we gave out the next cheer, I'm pretty sure the game stopped because of it, and they could have heard us in San Diego. Ah, to be in such a motivated group again!

SGT. Grit, Just the facts Ma'am. SGT. Joe Friday.

CPL. Seledrs

P.S. SGT. Rossi pointed out to me a long time ago that the only time you're an "X" Marine is when the X's are over your eyes.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #3)

I shall digress to explain the very last part of my previous letter. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered that production of passenger cars would be halted and the assembly lines would be converted to production of items for the military. In early 1942 gasoline was rationed for all civilian consumption. The limit for a private car was 3 gallons per week with an 'A' sticker; 8 gallons per week with a 'B' sticker (for those who had to commute to a war related job) or 5 gallons at a time with a 'C' sticker (These were unlimited and issued to police and fire personnel, doctors and farmers). You had to have a sticker on your windshield to buy any gas. When WWII ended so did gas rationing and people could again say 'Fill it up' and go wherever they wished. Soon new cars were coming off the lines. People had been able to save a lot of money during the war and were now taking trips to places they had never thought of going before. The roads were clogged. The New Castle - Pennsville ferry - between Delaware and New Jersey - was a major problem. The waiting time on either side was usually three to five hours. Delaware was the first to recognize this and decided to build a bridge between those two cities. They had the money and were able to complete the job within about two years. They named it the 'Delaware Memorial Bridge' to honor those who had served in WWII and did not survive. The construction of this bridge was going to place a burden on the road system of New Jersey which had nothing to gain because they felt that those who crossed the bridge were headed for New York City or New England - not Jersey. They got their heads together and soon placed articles in the local press showing a map of New Jersey with an almost straight line on it between Pennsville and N.Y.C. They said "If your property lies within 150 feet of this line it is in jeopardy of being acquired by the state for construction of the proposed New Jersey Turnpike." This became a topic of conversation - and lawsuits - for more than three years. You could not get a haircut without everyone in the barber shop voicing their opinion of this proposal. I lived quite close to the line but we were not involved. A nearby farmer by the name of 'Cecil' owned a 105 acre property that was to be cut in two. He took it very philosophically. He did not contest it. But in the end he was left with his 60 year old homestead, his barn and a half dozen other buildings on one side of the Turnpike and all of his pastures taken by the state or left on the other side of the road.

His only access to the pastures was to go about 12 miles north and through an underpass and go south 12 miles. And of course he was not able to move his cattle between his barn and the pastures. He sold his cattle and the acreage on the other side of the highway and decided to live out his life in the house that had been built in about 1890 on property his family had owned for more than 100 years. He passed away just a couple of years later and left his elderly widow and a grown son living in a three story home of simply humongous proportions.

My parents returned from vacation while I was in O.C. and went to the Cedar Lodge. They asked the owner if she could refer them to a realtor. - Mr. B's firm was right across the street.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Grabasstic Patrol Up A Creek

The Gun Club, assembled in the gulch. (Actually, 106RR or "BAT" Platoon (Battalion Anti-Tank) and Flame Platoon, combined)... H&S 2/1/9 in the Northern Training Area of Okinawa, 1959). Since our recoilless rifles and Jeeps had not caught up with us yet, we were used as the Bn Aggressor Force. The rifle companies would come up to the NTA one at a time from Sukiran to find/engage us... and, since the boondocks were our 'home court', the second and later companies really didn't have a chance... This is kinda old Corps... M-1's, M1919A4 air-cooled .30 Cal Brownings, herringbone utilities, and in this picture, the old green woolen shirts, as aggressor uniform. Since no blanks had been invented for the Flame Thrower (M2), the Flame guys usually got to be machine gun crew... most of either team having the M1911A1 .45cal pistol as sidearms. We were camping out up there for multiple weeks... got hot chow once most days, and some kick-back time when between companies... I recall an all-NCO grabasstic patrol up a creek... or maybe it should have been called 'swim call'?, as we were all buck nekkid, doing the Tarzan bit with vines, etc... until one of us realized that if somebody got seriously hurt, we were all in deep kimchi... In this picture, over half a century later, I can identify, among other trades, a surgeon, a feddle gubmint landscape architect, a mortgage broker, several law enforcement officers, and more than one career Marine... (buncha dumb-ss grunts, anyway...)

Ddick


Reunions

Got together with 3 guys I was in Boot Camp with while on a business trip to Louisiana. I have not seen these Marines since March 7, 1970 when we left MCRD San Diego for ITR at Camp Pendelton. Myself and Pvt Randall Axelsen immediately went to Infantry training while the rest of Platoon 1229 enjoyed a couple of week of Mess and Maintenance duty. We got together in LaPlace, LA.

Left to Right Sgt. Jim Grimes, Sgt. Mike Hinds, W05 Mike Anthony, and SSgt Jewell Cazes.

We are planning a reunion next year in Branson, Missouri. If you know of anyone from our Platoon please let me know.

Sgt. Jim Grimes 1969-72

P.S. note the horizontal alignment.


Short Rounds

Marine Survives Sniper Headshot By Inches In Afghanistan.

See video at: Marine Survives Sniper Headshot


Quotes

"All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting."
--George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia​


"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a h-ll of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it's quite fun to fight them, you know. It's a h-ll of a hoot. It's fun to shoot some people. I'll be right up there with you. I like brawling."
--Gen. James Mattis


"I come in peace. I didn't bring artillery. But I'm pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you f-ck with me, I'll kill you all."
--Gen. James Mattis


"There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion."
--Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army


"I can't hear you." "Get your footlockers over your heads."

"We dig fighting holes....not 'foxholes'....foxes use theirs to f-ckin'... ours are for fighting."

"The smoking lamp is lit for one. Guide, light it and pass it around."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 16 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Football Program
• B.S. Detector Ain't Broke
• Mail Call

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1stLt Batten Tombstone

While visiting a friends grave at the Wenonah, New Jersey cemetery recently, I happened upon this most amazing life size memorial statue on the grave of a long forgotten Marine of WWI. 1st. Lt. George B. Batten. Born in 1898, died 1926. He was a young man when he died. Was his death caused by his war experiences? Gassing or other wounds? Did he fight at Belleau Wood or The Somme? However or whatever the circumstances, his likeness on this memorial shows his pride in the Corps. He got my salute and will again next time I visit New Jersey. All of you South Jersey Marines, please visit Lt. Batten on the birthday, give him a proper salute, and lay a flower on his grave.

Semper Fi
Norm Spilleth
Cpl., '60 to '64


Like An Accordion

I recall a football game while I was in boot camp from 29 Sept. to 22 Dec in 1958. As I recall, it was between the Camp Lejeune Marines and San Diego University. I don't recall who won the game but the stadium was filled with recruits that had been there four weeks or longer. We had marched in as well as many other platoons. Then here came the white hats bobbing all over the place. When the command to stop came it was like an accordion. They all seemed to run together. That was the highlight of the game. We wore ponchos that night but it didn't rain. I am sure this was the same game that Wayne Mailhiot 1980xxx attended. I was in platoon 196, 1837xxx. After graduation on Dec. 22, 1958 we left for leave then I returned to Camp Pendleton for ITR. I was stationed at 29 palms for 2 and 1/2 years until I was discharged.

Sgt Grit I read your newsletters every week and really enjoy them. I have yet to see anyone on here that I served with. I wish everyone that sends you a letter would post there name and time of service and where. I often wonder when I read some of the stories if maybe I had served with them.

Cpl. Jerry Allen
1st Force Service Regiment, 29 Palms Calif.


Sgt Grit Vietnam Veteran Commemorative Pocket Knife


Only New Hampshire

Good Morn' Sgt.

Regarding The United States Marine Corps Birthday, as far as I know, New Hampshire is the only State that on that specific day, is the only state that will raise and fly The Marine Corps Colors for the entire day at the capital building in Concord New Hampshire. Could it be because one of the Marines that raised the United States Flag on Iwo Jima during WWII? His name was Rene Gagnon.

Happy Birthday to All Past, Present, & Future Marines!

Semper Fi
JC Angelo
1959 - 1965


Marine Football Program

Quantico and Cherry Point Marines Football Program

Quantico Marines Football Roster

I bought this program at an antique store a few months ago. It is a very professionally done 88 page program. In addition to rosters of both teams it also includes photos of the players, coaches, base commanders as well as the Commandant and others. This looks like it is from the hayday of Marine football. If anyone wants more information let me know.

Jim Grimes
Sgt 1969-72


Pvt. Brown

In early April 1952, Plt. 221 had just come back from the rifle range at Camp Mathews to MCRD San Diego and was marching across the grinder toward evening chow when we heard a male voice call out our Senior Drill Instructor's rank and last name. We were immediately halted and given the left face command which put me in the front rank so I could see and hear what was going on on front of me. The male voice belonged to a Navy Captain and he had a blond woman on his arm. After exchanging salutes the Captain asked our D.I. if he could see Pvt. Brown for just a minute and that he would double time him to our next destination after that. Our D.I. complied by having Pvt. Brown fall out and informed the Captain that we were headed to the mess hall. Pvt. Brown arrived at the mess hall very soon after we did.

Pvt. Brown had the rack just above mine and later in the evening some of our fellow recruits came over to our area of the Quonset to ask for a little information as to what was going on. Private Brown explained that the Captain was his father and the blond woman was his wife and that they hadn't been married very long. He also said that her name was Marion and that she had been an actress. One of the older men in the room was a real film buff and said he thought he knew who she was and said her last name and Pvt. Brown said that he was correct. A few of the guys in the room recognized the name but most of us didn't but were filled in later by the others.

In May my parents came down from Los Angeles for my graduation and there was other parents and relatives in attendance including Captain Brown and Marion and some introductions were made. When Pvt. Brown and I introduced our parents to each other my Father seemed a bit awe struck because he recognized Marion immediately. My Mother confessed to me later that she didn't have a clue but had heard the name before. After that we all said our goodbye's and I never saw Pvt. Brown again. "Marion" was Marion Davies of Hearst Castle fame and the former paramour of William Randolph Hearst.

I left USMC active duty in 1955 and used my G.I.Bill to attend college. Five years later I began my high school teaching career in Southern California, raised a family and lived never more than a five hour drive from Hearst Castle. Over the years I have driven north up HWY 1 several times going past the castle and twice I stopped and took two different tours. Every time I go by the castle I think of Pvt. Brown and wonder what happened to him and what kind of a life did he have.

Semper Fi!
Jim Quam
Sgt. of Marines 1952-55


B.S. Detector Ain't Broke

A question for One & all... A 60 something guy works with my 32 year old son. Inventory auditors in major department stores. He tells folks he is or was a Marine. MOS is 7000 something; Aircraft Fire / Rescue. I asked why are you doing this work rather than aircraft career? "I got tired of seeing crispy bodies."

Yes, he served in Vietnam. Two tours I think he said. "Where did you serve in country" I asked. "I was in L.Z.'s" In Vietnam he enjoyed killing the enemy. It was almost as much as fun as beating up another recruit & a Warrant Officer 3 or 4 days before Graduation. Those fights are what kept him from making E3 out of Parris Island boot camp in 1969.

Is their ANY TRUTH in this story? Seriously, what is MOS # for Aircraft Fire / Rescue? No my B.S detector ain't broke; I only question number designator for Aircraft Fire / Rescue. Is there a listing somewhere of MOS's?

Don Ryan


1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment

Marines of 1st Bn 5th Marine Regiment Vietnam

Members of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division walk along Highway 1 to make a sweep of a rice paddy in Vietnam.

(Photo courtesy of the Marine Corps/National Archives)


AHHH-HO

I did my time on Recruiting duty for the Marines in my home state of Oklahoma. I recruited a young Man from the Arapaho Tribe and spent a lot of time with him at family Pow Wows, and medicine dances. When it was time for him to get ready to go to boot camp I was calling around the reservation Looking for him and got his brother on the Phone. He said, "Ahhh-Ho, so you are looking for little John, My little Brother." I said "I think so, I did not know he had a Brother." He laughed and said "You don't remember me?" I am Allen Redbird, I am John Redbirds older brother." You and I went to Boot Camp together in 1973. I had recruited the little brother of one my Own Boot Camp Platoon and didn't even know it until just before he went to Boot Camp.

When John came back from boot camp, they had a Honors Dance for him, and when I was out gourd dancing with the Men, Mother Redbird came out and placed a Blanket over my shoulders, and gave me a Dancing Gourd Rattle. She then said this one is a Redbird. Adopting me into the Redbird Clan of The Cheyenne and Arapaho of Oklahoma. This was one of the True Highlights of my time in the Marines. Having grown up in Oklahoma I always had a great feeling for Our Native American tribes. It was a VERY special Moment for me.

Me with the Marine Corps Colors, Indian Hills Pow Wow Grand entire.

AHHH-HO

Thomas G Hill
GySgt, USMC (Ret)


Rebuilding America One Marine At A Time

Rebuilding America Facebook Post

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page last week. It displays the text "Rebuilding America One Marine At A Time" at the top. The first picture shows some teenagers with their trousers hanging low and their boxers showing. The text below that picture reads "What We Are Given...". Then next picture shows a Drill Instructor having a caring conversation with an uncovered recruit at MCRD San Diego. The text below this picture reads "How we train...". The final picture shows a graduating Marine PFC that is the Company Honorman, next to his recruiter, and Senior Drill Instructor. The text below this picture reads "What We Produce... Marines!"

Here are a few comments made about this post:


M. Minor - Meanwhile, in Army boot camp...

Army Basic

R.M. Muro - Nothing comes easy. We're a breed of service, not a branch of service.


Marine phrase said by GySgt Hartman

Troy Swan


P. Eisman - I feel every person in America who is medically able, should spend 3 years in the military. They may pick the branch of service they want to join. The United States and our young adults would be in much better condition, than they are now. Israel does this in their country.


M. Minor - Can't leave out the Air Force.


T. Gerard - Your life changes when you step on those little yellow foot prints.


Soldier standing by truck in the field

M. Godoy - Hey now we cannot forgot the army! They're army strong or be all that you can be or is it go army... oh hell f-ck it who cares!

United States Marine Corps Veteran here and Semper Fidelis Brothers.


D. Spencer - Please. Build faster. We are falling apart!


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Celebration Of Life

Celebration of Life by a DOC

This was on the table at a Celebration of life for a Marine from the 49th Marines of Mission, British Columbia. Home of the 49th Marines. All those that live above the 49th Parallel, in Canada. Of course, this would include every Navy Corpsman that served with the Marines... our DOC's.

Gerry Flowers


Chicago Marine Birthday

Sgt. Grit,

Does any of your readership know of a good place to hang with Marines in the Chicagoland area on the birthday? I used to go to a place only a few miles away from me in Chicago called "Jarheads", owned by a 'Nam vet everyone called "Sarge". Well, apparently, Sarge retired (or something), and the bar passed into the hands of a different Marine, a young guy (I think he's fresh from the Iraq/Afghan wars), but this young Marine is managing to successfully turn this Marine hangout into a Mexican cowboy bar to more appeal to the local prevailing demographic.

Served peacetime from 1992-1996, then came back in 2002 for another year until I hit service limits. I'm 0311/8152/2111 (and maybe a few others!)

I keep reading of all these places Marines hang out at for birthday celebrations in your newsletter, and was hoping that maybe another Chicagoland Marine could hook me up with a place where a lot of other Marines can hang on the birthday.

Thanks.

Shadow Fire Promotions, Inc.
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Mail Call

Mail Call in Boot Camp

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page this week. The image shows a Marine Corps recruit receiving snail mail from his Senior Drill Instructor. The text on the image reads "Mail Call... In today's tech savvy world... Nothing carries the power of a handwritten letter a Marine recruit receives in boot camp... The Memories...".

Here are some of the comments made about this post:

K. LaVallee - My dad is a former Marine and while my husband was in boot camp he sent a letter that on the back of the envelope he highlighted, "Have you hugged your drill instructor today?"... My dad knew what he was doing.


Sgt Grit - No former Marines Kayla... Once... Always... Semper Fi.


K. LaVallee - I agree Sgt Grit! I was just raised that you refer to a Marine that is no longer active duty as a former Marine because an "Ex Marine" is the worst, most politically incorrect term you could use! But every Marine should be addressed as such, Marine! I apologize.


N. Culver - My pops, also a Marine, sent me mail and addressed it to me with my rank as SgtMaj. That went over well... memories. LOL.


Letter Received via Air Mail in Boot Camp 1972

R.E. Lee - I still have my letters from 1972.


J. Daun - Getting mail was the BEST! Unless you got too much and then you were a "target"... Semper Fi!


J. Roth - Mail call... no sh-t. Best part of the day, even if you had to suffer to get it.


Z. Maloney - Unless it was from Mary, regarding Jody!


D. Wentworth - (claps hands) Mail Recieved Aye Sir!


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From the DISBUSRING CHIEF

(VOL #10, #2)

I returned to the hotel, got out of the hot Dress Blues and put on a pair of swim trunks to go out to the pool. I swam around for a while and went in to change into something I could wear into the dining room. I went down for something light; had a great turkey club sandwich and an iced tea. I returned to my room, showered and turned in for the night. I planned to leave for home when I arose in the morning. I slept like a log until 0500. I took another shower, got dressed and checked out before 0600. I was on my way home - 600 miles away. I drove a little faster than I did on my way west to Richmond. I planned to make it home by 1800. My first stop, for breakfast, was at the same place Mary and I had stopped the previous Thursday morning. It was quite good. I was back on the road. After I passed Columbus I pulled into a gas station to fill the tank. This would get me to the Midway on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I don't think the car came to a complete stop until I reached that point. It was just after 1300 when I pulled into the Midway. I filled the tank, checked everything else and went into the restaurant for my last meal before I would be home. I started out on the final leg of this trip just before 1400. I had just four hours to cover about 225 miles. I was on schedule.

I arrived at Mary's house - where I had been staying while my Mom & Dad were on their extended vacation around the United States - at 1755 - just 5 minutes ahead of schedule. The 'B's were happy to see me. They had just finished dinner and asked if I was hungry. I was really starving but said "No, I'll pass this time." They wanted to hear all about my trip - and Mary's entrance into Earlham. I told them everything; where we stopped Wednesday evening; about Mary turning the check in at the Admissions Office; and where we stayed Thursday and Friday night. I told them about taking Mary to The Hollyhock Hill restaurant in Indianapolis. Mrs.'B' said "That must be a very special place to drive 75 miles each way for dinner." Mr. 'B' said "They must serve some d-mned good food. I would never drive that far to eat. I'd starve to death first." When I told them about my Sunday surprise for Mary they thought that was great. Mr. 'B' said "If we had taken her to the college we would have left on Friday, dumped her off on Saturday and returned home on Sunday." Mrs.'B' said "There you go again - saying stupid things. You know quite well that it would not have been that way." He started laughing his head off again. Then he said "Well Harold, I have some good news for you. Do you by any chance remember picking up the newspaper when we were leaving for the beach?" I said "Yes." He asked "Did you by any chance read any of it?" I said "I glanced at the front page." He asked "Do you remember any of what you read?" I thought about this for a moment and said "Yes, I vaguely remember it said something about The Hemlocks being sold." He said "That's it! One of the girls in my firm had written a contract on that property. And while we were in O.C. it was finalized. The sellers then bought a home in Moorestown - through our firm - and moved into their new home while we were still in O.C. I am sure you are wondering what this all means to you. Well, I'll tell you. It was an all cash transaction and it was your parents that purchased 'The Hemlocks'. They moved in while you were on your trip to Richmond. What do you think of that?" I was speechless. There had been much in the press about that property during the process to build the New Jersey Turnpike - which had cut straight thru that property - cutting it into 2 separate parcels.

Semper Fi... The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Virtual Wall, you can search by name, state, unit etc...

http://www.virtualwall.org/iStates.htm


Motivation. Early.

www.wimp.com/militarycadence

YOU Will like this


I was stationed at MAB Iwakuni Japan '65 and I remember one main gate the other gate was chained and locked. This gate was close to the quonset hut that was my home for a short time we then moved to brand new barracks. The mess hall was run by Marines with the help of Japanese civilians. It was great to read about someone who was there, but at a different time. Iwakuni brings back fond memories that are not forgotten.

Thanks Sgt (ski) Nowicki!

Vic
Semper Fi


Quotes

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits."
--Attributed to Albert Einstein


"Such is the irresistible nature of truth that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing."
--Thomas Paine


"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
--Theodore Roosevelt


"The battle of Iwo Island has been won. The United States Marines by their individual and collective courage have conquered a base which is as necessary to us in our continuing forward movement toward final victory as it was vital to the enemy in staving off ultimate defeat. By their victory, the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions and other units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps have made an accounting to their country which only history will be able to value fully. Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."
--Admiral Chester W. Nimitz


"No compact among men... can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other."
--George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, 1789


"Who is that tapping on my door? I can't hear you t-rd!"

"Assume the dead bug position." "Ready fall." "Get down & get up."

"Get your little red books out & put it up to your face!"

God Bless the American Dream!
Sgt Grit

©2014 Sgt Grit Inc
All rights reserved
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Oklahoma City, OK 73179
888-NOV-1775
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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 16 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Football Program
• B.S. Detector Ain't Broke
• Mail Call

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

Flags   Family Member   Ka-Bars   Auto   Headgear  Jackets  ALL CATEGORIES  

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While visiting a friends grave at the Wenonah, New Jersey cemetery recently, I happened upon this most amazing life size memorial statue on the grave of a long forgotten Marine of WWI. 1st. Lt. George B. Batten. Born in 1898, died 1926. He was a young man when he died. Was his death caused by his war experiences? Gassing or other wounds? Did he fight at Belleau Wood or The Somme? However or whatever the circumstances, his likeness on this memorial shows his pride in the Corps. He got my salute and will again next time I visit New Jersey. All of you South Jersey Marines, please visit Lt. Batten on the birthday, give him a proper salute, and lay a flower on his grave.

Semper Fi
Norm Spilleth
Cpl., '60 to '64


Like An Accordion

I recall a football game while I was in boot camp from 29 Sept. to 22 Dec in 1958. As I recall, it was between the Camp Lejeune Marines and San Diego University. I don't recall who won the game but the stadium was filled with recruits that had been there four weeks or longer. We had marched in as well as many other platoons. Then here came the white hats bobbing all over the place. When the command to stop came it was like an accordion. They all seemed to run together. That was the highlight of the game. We wore ponchos that night but it didn't rain. I am sure this was the same game that Wayne Mailhiot 1980xxx attended. I was in platoon 196, 1837xxx. After graduation on Dec. 22, 1958 we left for leave then I returned to Camp Pendleton for ITR. I was stationed at 29 palms for 2 and 1/2 years until I was discharged.

Sgt Grit I read your newsletters every week and really enjoy them. I have yet to see anyone on here that I served with. I wish everyone that sends you a letter would post there name and time of service and where. I often wonder when I read some of the stories if maybe I had served with them.

Cpl. Jerry Allen
1st Force Service Regiment, 29 Palms Calif.


Only New Hampshire

Good Morn' Sgt.

Regarding The United States Marine Corps Birthday, as far as I know, New Hampshire is the only State that on that specific day, is the only state that will raise and fly The Marine Corps Colors for the entire day at the capital building in Concord New Hampshire. Could it be because one of the Marines that raised the United States Flag on Iwo Jima during WWII? His name was Rene Gagnon.

Happy Birthday to All Past, Present, & Future Marines!

Semper Fi
JC Angelo
1959 - 1965


Marine Football Program

I bought this program at an antique store a few months ago. It is a very professionally done 88 page program. In addition to rosters of both teams it also includes photos of the players, coaches, base commanders as well as the Commandant and others. This looks like it is from the hayday of Marine football. If anyone wants more information let me know.

Jim Grimes
Sgt 1969-72


Pvt. Brown

In early April 1952, Plt. 221 had just come back from the rifle range at Camp Mathews to MCRD San Diego and was marching across the grinder toward evening chow when we heard a male voice call out our Senior Drill Instructor's rank and last name. We were immediately halted and given the left face command which put me in the front rank so I could see and hear what was going on on front of me. The male voice belonged to a Navy Captain and he had a blond woman on his arm. After exchanging salutes the Captain asked our D.I. if he could see Pvt. Brown for just a minute and that he would double time him to our next destination after that. Our D.I. complied by having Pvt. Brown fall out and informed the Captain that we were headed to the mess hall. Pvt. Brown arrived at the mess hall very soon after we did.

Pvt. Brown had the rack just above mine and later in the evening some of our fellow recruits came over to our area of the Quonset to ask for a little information as to what was going on. Private Brown explained that the Captain was his father and the blond woman was his wife and that they hadn't been married very long. He also said that her name was Marion and that she had been an actress. One of the older men in the room was a real film buff and said he thought he knew who she was and said her last name and Pvt. Brown said that he was correct. A few of the guys in the room recognized the name but most of us didn't but were filled in later by the others.

In May my parents came down from Los Angeles for my graduation and there was other parents and relatives in attendance including Captain Brown and Marion and some introductions were made. When Pvt. Brown and I introduced our parents to each other my Father seemed a bit awe struck because he recognized Marion immediately. My Mother confessed to me later that she didn't have a clue but had heard the name before. After that we all said our goodbye's and I never saw Pvt. Brown again. "Marion" was Marion Davies of Hearst Castle fame and the former paramour of William Randolph Hearst.

I left USMC active duty in 1955 and used my G.I.Bill to attend college. Five years later I began my high school teaching career in Southern California, raised a family and lived never more than a five hour drive from Hearst Castle. Over the years I have driven north up HWY 1 several times going past the castle and twice I stopped and took two different tours. Every time I go by the castle I think of Pvt. Brown and wonder what happened to him and what kind of a life did he have.

Semper Fi!
Jim Quam
Sgt. of Marines 1952-55


B.S. Detector Ain't Broke

A question for One & all... A 60 something guy works with my 32 year old son. Inventory auditors in major department stores. He tells folks he is or was a Marine. MOS is 7000 something; Aircraft Fire / Rescue. I asked why are you doing this work rather than aircraft career? "I got tired of seeing crispy bodies."

Yes, he served in Vietnam. Two tours I think he said. "Where did you serve in country" I asked. "I was in L.Z.'s" In Vietnam he enjoyed killing the enemy. It was almost as much as fun as beating up another recruit & a Warrant Officer 3 or 4 days before Graduation. Those fights are what kept him from making E3 out of Parris Island boot camp in 1969.

Is their ANY TRUTH in this story? Seriously, what is MOS # for Aircraft Fire / Rescue? No my B.S detector ain't broke; I only question number designator for Aircraft Fire / Rescue. Is there a listing somewhere of MOS's?

Don Ryan


1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment

Members of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division walk along Highway 1 to make a sweep of a rice paddy in Vietnam.

(Photo courtesy of the Marine Corps/National Archives)


AHHH-HO

I did my time on Recruiting duty for the Marines in my home state of Oklahoma. I recruited a young Man from the Arapaho Tribe and spent a lot of time with him at family Pow Wows, and medicine dances. When it was time for him to get ready to go to boot camp I was calling around the reservation Looking for him and got his brother on the Phone. He said, "Ahhh-Ho, so you are looking for little John, My little Brother." I said "I think so, I did not know he had a Brother." He laughed and said "You don't remember me?" I am Allen Redbird, I am John Redbirds older brother." You and I went to Boot Camp together in 1973. I had recruited the little brother of one my Own Boot Camp Platoon and didn't even know it until just before he went to Boot Camp.

When John came back from boot camp, they had a Honors Dance for him, and when I was out gourd dancing with the Men, Mother Redbird came out and placed a Blanket over my shoulders, and gave me a Dancing Gourd Rattle. She then said this one is a Redbird. Adopting me into the Redbird Clan of The Cheyenne and Arapaho of Oklahoma. This was one of the True Highlights of my time in the Marines. Having grown up in Oklahoma I always had a great feeling for Our Native American tribes. It was a VERY special Moment for me.

Me with the Marine Corps Colors, Indian Hills Pow Wow Grand entire.

AHHH-HO

Thomas G Hill
GySgt, USMC (Ret)


Rebuilding America One Marine At A Time

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page last week. It displays the text "Rebuilding America One Marine At A Time" at the top. The first picture shows some teenagers with their trousers hanging low and their boxers showing. The text below that picture reads "What We Are Given...". Then next picture shows a Drill Instructor having a caring conversation with an uncovered recruit at MCRD San Diego. The text below this picture reads "How we train...". The final picture shows a graduating Marine PFC that is the Company Honorman, next to his recruiter, and Senior Drill Instructor. The text below this picture reads "What We Produce... Marines!"


View comments that were left about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Celebration Of Life

This was on the table at a Celebration of life for a Marine from the 49th Marines of Mission, British Columbia. Home of the 49th Marines. All those that live above the 49th Parallel, in Canada. Of course, this would include every Navy Corpsman that served with the Marines... our DOC's.

Gerry Flowers


Chicago Marine Birthday

Sgt. Grit,

Does any of your readership know of a good place to hang with Marines in the Chicagoland area on the birthday? I used to go to a place only a few miles away from me in Chicago called "Jarheads", owned by a 'Nam vet everyone called "Sarge". Well, apparently, Sarge retired (or something), and the bar passed into the hands of a different Marine, a young guy (I think he's fresh from the Iraq/Afghan wars), but this young Marine is managing to successfully turn this Marine hangout into a Mexican cowboy bar to more appeal to the local prevailing demographic.

Served peacetime from 1992-1996, then came back in 2002 for another year until I hit service limits. I'm 0311/8152/2111 (and maybe a few others!)

I keep reading of all these places Marines hang out at for birthday celebrations in your newsletter, and was hoping that maybe another Chicagoland Marine could hook me up with a place where a lot of other Marines can hang on the birthday.

Thanks.

Shadow Fire Promotions, Inc.
"Your Chicago Source For Wrestling"
Visit us on the web at: http://www.sfpincchicago.com
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Chicago, IL 60690
(847) 489-2087


Mail Call

This image was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page this week. The image shows a Marine Corps recruit receiving snail mail from his Senior Drill Instructor. The text on the image reads "Mail Call... In today's tech savvy world... Nothing carries the power of a handwritten letter a Marine recruit receives in boot camp... The Memories...".


View comments that were left about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


From the DISBUSRING CHIEF

(VOL #10, #2)

I returned to the hotel, got out of the hot Dress Blues and put on a pair of swim trunks to go out to the pool. I swam around for a while and went in to change into something I could wear into the dining room. I went down for something light; had a great turkey club sandwich and an iced tea. I returned to my room, showered and turned in for the night. I planned to leave for home when I arose in the morning. I slept like a log until 0500. I took another shower, got dressed and checked out before 0600. I was on my way home - 600 miles away. I drove a little faster than I did on my way west to Richmond. I planned to make it home by 1800. My first stop, for breakfast, was at the same place Mary and I had stopped the previous Thursday morning. It was quite good. I was back on the road. After I passed Columbus I pulled into a gas station to fill the tank. This would get me to the Midway on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I don't think the car came to a complete stop until I reached that point. It was just after 1300 when I pulled into the Midway. I filled the tank, checked everything else and went into the restaurant for my last meal before I would be home. I started out on the final leg of this trip just before 1400. I had just four hours to cover about 225 miles. I was on schedule.

I arrived at Mary's house - where I had been staying while my Mom & Dad were on their extended vacation around the United States - at 1755 - just 5 minutes ahead of schedule. The 'B's were happy to see me. They had just finished dinner and asked if I was hungry. I was really starving but said "No, I'll pass this time." They wanted to hear all about my trip - and Mary's entrance into Earlham. I told them everything; where we stopped Wednesday evening; about Mary turning the check in at the Admissions Office; and where we stayed Thursday and Friday night. I told them about taking Mary to The Hollyhock Hill restaurant in Indianapolis. Mrs.'B' said "That must be a very special place to drive 75 miles each way for dinner." Mr. 'B' said "They must serve some d-mned good food. I would never drive that far to eat. I'd starve to death first." When I told them about my Sunday surprise for Mary they thought that was great. Mr. 'B' said "If we had taken her to the college we would have left on Friday, dumped her off on Saturday and returned home on Sunday." Mrs.'B' said "There you go again - saying stupid things. You know quite well that it would not have been that way." He started laughing his head off again. Then he said "Well Harold, I have some good news for you. Do you by any chance remember picking up the newspaper when we were leaving for the beach?" I said "Yes." He asked "Did you by any chance read any of it?" I said "I glanced at the front page." He asked "Do you remember any of what you read?" I thought about this for a moment and said "Yes, I vaguely remember it said something about The Hemlocks being sold." He said "That's it! One of the girls in my firm had written a contract on that property. And while we were in O.C. it was finalized. The sellers then bought a home in Moorestown - through our firm - and moved into their new home while we were still in O.C. I am sure you are wondering what this all means to you. Well, I'll tell you. It was an all cash transaction and it was your parents that purchased 'The Hemlocks'. They moved in while you were on your trip to Richmond. What do you think of that?" I was speechless. There had been much in the press about that property during the process to build the New Jersey Turnpike - which had cut straight thru that property - cutting it into 2 separate parcels.

Semper Fi... The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Virtual Wall, you can search by name, state, unit etc...

http://www.virtualwall.org/iStates.htm


Motivation. Early.

www.wimp.com/militarycadence

YOU Will like this


I was stationed at MAB Iwakuni Japan '65 and I remember one main gate the other gate was chained and locked. This gate was close to the quonset hut that was my home for a short time we then moved to brand new barracks. The mess hall was run by Marines with the help of Japanese civilians. It was great to read about someone who was there, but at a different time. Iwakuni brings back fond memories that are not forgotten.

Thanks Sgt (ski) Nowicki!

Vic
Semper Fi


Quotes

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits."
--Attributed to Albert Einstein


"Such is the irresistible nature of truth that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing."
--Thomas Paine


"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
--Theodore Roosevelt


"The battle of Iwo Island has been won. The United States Marines by their individual and collective courage have conquered a base which is as necessary to us in our continuing forward movement toward final victory as it was vital to the enemy in staving off ultimate defeat. By their victory, the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions and other units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps have made an accounting to their country which only history will be able to value fully. Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."
--Admiral Chester W. Nimitz


"No compact among men... can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other."
--George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, 1789


"Who is that tapping on my door? I can't hear you t-rd!"

"Assume the dead bug position." "Ready fall." "Get down & get up."

"Get your little red books out & put it up to your face!"

God Bless the American Dream!
Sgt Grit

©2014 Sgt Grit Inc
All rights reserved
7100 SW 44th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73179
888-NOV-1775
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To Submit a story - Email info@grunt.com.
Subscribe to this newsletter.

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Sgt Grit Newsletter

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 09 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Corps Emblem
• Vision 2 Victory
• Carlson's Raiders

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Marines of MACS-2 MAG-13 at 5th Reunion 1958-1962

Summer home location of MACS-2 MAG-13 5th Reunion

The 2014 MACS-2, 5th Reunion was hosted by Cpl & Mrs. Clark McCormack at their Summer Home on the shore of Lake Jefferson, in Cleveland, Minnesota, from 25 thru 27 July 2014... MACS-2, MAG-13, 1st Marine Brigade, FMFPAC, Kaneohe Bay. We served during 1958-1962.

Clark McCormack, Don Spann, Carl Dubac, James Spinner, Tom Lutz, Dennis Skiffington, Dick McMahon, Bill Muckler, & Pete Kristall.

Pete Kristall


Marine Corps Emblem

This past weekend my wife and I were driving to the beach to take a walk. On the way we hit some metal at the side of the road and it tore a chunk out of my right rear tire. I drove carefully to a boat ramp about 60 yards away, so that I would be off the road and have room for the tire to be changed. I was calling AAA when a pickup pulling a boat came up the ramp and stopped. Fellow in his 40's jumped out and said I will change that for you. He said he saw the Marine Corps emblem on my car, (thanks to Sgt. Grit) and that is why he stopped. His father was in the Corps, as was his brother and his wife's father. He apologized that he did not join the Corps as he went right into the police academy after college and is still a police officer. To add a little more to this tale as were talking as he was leaving it turned out that I served on our local police department with his wife's father, and he knew my oldest two boys who had served as officers in this town and the town he works in.

Larry Whalen, Cpl. 1951-54

Check out our wide selection of Marine Corps POV Decals!


Ice Hole

Sgt. Grit,

Since there seems to be an NTC discussion going on, I'll have to put in my 10 cents worth (cost of living increase from 2 cents). I was sent TAD on two separate occasions, the first in January, 1953 to Yeoman "B" school, a 10 week course in Gregg Simplified Shorthand. I was a Sergeant (E4), just with 4 years service; the class makeup was all Marines, including 2 WMs, instructors were a Chief and a 1st Class. Surprisingly enough, I managed to finish and wound up with a secondary MOS of 0121; recorded 2 Special Courts Martial, as I recall.

A shorthand exercise the Chief gave us once was how to catch bears in Maine: You have to wait until winter when the lakes all freeze over (you are only going to catch the dumb bears, the smart ones are hibernating); next you cut a hole in the ice, take a can of peas and line the hole and wait for the bear to show up; then when the bear comes up to take a pea, you run up behind him and kick him in the ice hole.

The second time was over 12 years later; I was stationed at MCAS, Yuma, AZ, assigned to H&HS, working at Base Headquarters. I had been promoted to SSgt (E5) in early 1957, got caught up in the reclassification and wound up as a Sgt (E5) until 1966. CO was Col. Joe McGlothlin and XO LtCol Wilson Terry.

My second trip to NTC in 1965 was to Motion Picture Operator School; the Station operator was transferred and so I was selected to go to school again. Since I was one of the few Marines at NTC, it became my "privilege" to conduct close order drill for the platoons of Navy personnel waiting to go into the mess hall. Talk about the proverbial Chinese Fire Drill, these clowns had trouble knowing which foot was their left and which was their right. It was interesting, to say the least.

After returning to Yuma, I got to operate the projector for a lot of private "R" rated films for the CO and his guests, in addition to movies at the Base Theater.

Semper Fi,
James R. McMahon
GySgt of Marines (1949-1970)
Hendersonville, TN


Eagle, Globe, and Anchor Gameday Performance Cover/Hat


Vision 2 Victory

Wall of Remembrance Truck and Trailer

Sgt Grit and Marine Veteran Derek Hendershot

Sgt Grit and Staff were recently honored with a visit by Marine Veteran Derek Hendershot. Derek is on the Board of Directors for the Vision 2 Victory program. This program is led and operated by military veterans. Following the completion of the Wall of Remembrance by Marine Veteran David Brown, which bares the names of all servicemen and women that have been KIA since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism, Derek was tasked with touring the 2nd generation Wall all over the country.

Now that the touring of the Wall of Remembrance is drawing to a close, this team of motivated Veterans have begun fundraising to upgrade the current Wall before next year's tour kicks off. The upgrades will include replicas of the Twin Towers with iPads to allow visitors to easily access the names on the wall, to include adding LED lighting to create two towers of light at night. More images will be added to the entrance to include a wind screen mural of combat scenes, five battlefield crosses that are specific to each branch with their corresponding branch flags, as well as the POW/MIA and U.S. Flag. The names of the fallen from 1983 to present day will be added to the Wall. Yes, that means that the names of the fallen from Beirut, Desert Storm/Shield, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Iraq will all travel across the country. To top it all off, they will add a Close Encounters booth. The booth will display internet size video clips of the fallen submitted by their families and friends.

We are so glad that Derek chose to stop by en route back to Sacramento, CA, where the 2nd generation Wall of Remembrance will be retired between 10-12 November, 2014. Visit the Vision 2 Victory website, to find out about upcoming events and how you can contribute towards the 3rd generation Wall of Remembrance.

Semper Fi!


Carlson's Raiders

Grit,

I have to make a correction to my statement, Lt. Col. Carlson was embedded with the Chinese Communist after The China Marines left China who used the term Gung Ho (all together) fighting the Japanese. He was not a Communist, a devote Christian based on Socialism. This aroused suspicion in the Marine Corps. He left the Corps in 1939, in 1941 he used his White House Connections thru Capt. James Roosevelt USMC Reserves to re-enlist.

President Roosevelt had wanted a Unit somewhat like the British Commandos, At the start of World War Two, The Marine Corps did not want a Guerrilla role. First Raider Battalion formed on East Coast February 16, 1942 under Lt. Col. Merritt A. Edson, Second Raider Battalion formed on West Coast February 19, 1942 under Lt. Col. Evans F. Carlson. Both were in First Marine Division Para Marines formed up in 1940. East Coast trained at Lake Hurst N. J., West Coast trained at Camp Elliot, CA.

They were later merged into both Raider Battalions, so some Raiders were actually qualified as both. (Ira Hayes and Harlan Block flag raisers on Iwo Jima were both ).

Lt. Col. Edson led the First Raiders in the landings at Guadalcanal on August 7, 1942. Ten days later Lt. Col. Carlson and Maj. Roosevelt raided Makin Island with six Rifle Company's aboard Submarines from Hawaii, the Argonaut with Lt. Col. Carlson and 121 Marines, the Nautilus with Maj. Roosevelt with 90 Marines aboard, from the Second Raider Battalion. After returning to Hawaii the Second Raider Battalion later also landed at Guadalcanal, Lt. Col. Carlson leading the longest march. In 1944 the Raiders were disband all going to different Divisions in the Corps.

Ron Morse; I know the book title is Merritt's Raiders however The Raiders were and still are known as Carlson's Raiders as it was his concept how they trained and fought.

MGYSGT W. Schroeder
XX19137


Lifers

Sgt. Grit,

I graduated boot camp on October 9, 1964, fifty years ago. Memory of it is just as vivid now as it was then. November 10, 2014 I will celebrate my 50th Marine Corps Birthday (Camp Lejeune 2nd Marine Division parade & cake cutting was my first in November 1964). And again, the memory is vivid. Now, I know that there are many of my fellow Marines who have celebrated more USMC birthdays than I have, and I read intently the stories that they write. To them, I'm a boot. I will probably be boot to someone for as long the almighty sees fit not to call me home. I'm simply pondering how quickly the years have zipped by and how honored I feel to be a Marine.

One other subject I have been pondering. As a young PFC with Bravo Co. 1st Bn. 6th Marines, I knew and planned that I would make a career of the Marine Corps. My fellow Marines had a name for those of us who had made that choice. They called us "lifers". They would also joke about my coffee cup finger having the same hook as the company Gunny's. I never tried to deny that I intended to stay in the Marine Corps to at least get promoted to GySgt.

I frequently have the opportunity to talk to Marines of many eras who didn't stay past four years. Interestingly enough, all of them say they wish they had stayed for 20 years. And many of them are just as loyal and dedicated to the Marine Corps as they were when they were on active duty. I frequently see Marine Corps stickers on cars, trucks, and vans driven by Marines who didn't stay for twenty years. Their love of the "Corps" is just as strong as it was when they were on active duty. So, what it boils down to is that I think that all Marines are "lifers" in their own way. Peer pressure is a powerful force.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC (Ret)


Don't Try It On A Marine

In reading the letter about the helo pilot that went off on his own to fight the VC, I was reminded of one I met at a B&B on Veterans day a couple of years ago.

This man told how he never finished boot camp as he was so good at unarmed combat that he was pulled out for assignment to some special secret unit. He was first sent to jungle training and upon completion of that was flown to MCRD SD and sent into a mile long Quonset hut filled with weapons and told to take his pick. He was then sent straight to RVN and turned loose on the enemy. Upon return to ConUS he was medically retired due to wounds received. Never received care as no one ever told him he could go to the VA. There were two other couples there also and to save his wife any embarrassment I remained quiet although it was not easy. You may bullsh-t AF and Navy guys but don't try it on another Marine.

SSgt Joe
RVN 66 & 67


Once A Marine, Always A Marine

Recently, on October 2nd, 2014, former talk show host, Marine and Navy veteran Montel Williams was interviewed by Fox News about his testimony in a DC hearing concerning Marine Sgt Andrew Tahmooressi who has been jailed in Mexico for over 6-months.

View the interview at: fxn.ws/1ugebAP.


Major Carlson

Sgt Grit,

Subject: Gung Ho

As I am now 76, with a memory retention of about fifteen seconds, after reading J.J. Lopez' "correction", I reread the book.

The following information in the book was all confirmed on Google.

Major Carlson spent eighteen (18) months embedded with the Eight Route Army of the Chinese Communists. On his return, he wrote a book about his experience with the Communists called: Twin Stars over China (the book is still available). Publishing the book got him a severe reprimand from the Marine Corps.

His career was saved by James Roosevelt, son of FDR. James later became a Captain in the Raiders. GUNG HO was the battle cry of the Chines troops. He later confirmed this to his Raider Bn. Carlson's son, Captain Carlson, was a contributor to the book in question: Carlson's Raid, The Daring Marine Assault on Makin Island by George W. Smith

No mention of the "Chinese Marines...

Bill McDermott
180xxxx
Dress blues, tennis shoes, and a light coat of oil...


Marine Corps Response To Terrorist Threats

Marine Corps response to terrorist threats

The Marine Corps' response to terrorist threats: Threat assessed... Target acquired... Target Elimatated... Awaiting Next Target!


Iwakuni

Memories of Iwakuni, I was stationed at Iwakuni 1955 - 56 - 57, a real long time ago. If I recall, block 8 was with a small flower garden in the center and the rooms were around it two stories high. The mess hall was run by the navy I think. The slipway was where some PT boats were kept. The navy had PBY's that used the water to land. At the base Australian Air Force was stationed, remember how they practiced landing with one prop engine shut down etc. Myself, I worked off base at the Otake supply center along with a Pfc and 2 Japanese nationals, a small forklift shop, and there were many machines. There were two gates to the base, the main and a small back gate that most of the nationals used besides the Marines. If I recall, out the main gate on the drag strip was a restaurant and bar called the Texas Steak House, it was said that it was run by someone who took a discharge in Japan. I believe in early '56 the order came down for all enlisted dependents to go back stateside.

Well this brought back a lot when I read the post about Iwakuni from an old Marine, but still a Marine!

Sgt. (ski) Nowicki


USMC Football

I too was at the Football game mentioned in the 10/2 newsletter. I also was at MCRD San Diego from Sept to Dec 1961, but in Platoon 175. The game was between the San Diego Chargers and the USMC team, and was held at Balboa stadium which was the Chargers home field at that time. Balboa stadium stood next to San Diego HS on the east side of downtown. Do not remember and details of the game as I was pre-occupied with enjoying the fleeting freedom. I also remember (I think) that it was only sailors and Marines in attendance. Also it was grey and cold. Probably about Thanksgiving timeframe. This also was the ONLY non-training event that I ever saw during boot!

Wayne Mailhiot 1980XXX
MCRDSD Plt. 175 C Co. 1st BN. RTR Sept 1961-Dec. 1961
C Co. 1st BN., 2nd ITR, Camp Pendleton Dec 14- Feb 2, 1962
H-3-11 2531 Fld. Radio operator Camp Pendleton Mar. 1962-Feb 1963
Comm-Elect School Bn. Mar 1963-Jan 1964
6641 Aviation Radar Technician AN/TPS37 MACS 1 MCAS Yuma, AZ Jan 1964-Dec 1964
TAD Comm-Elect School Bn. Dec 1964-Mar 1965
5941 Aviation Radar Technician AN/TPS34 MACS 1 MCAS Yuma, AZ Mar 1965-Jan 1966
Honorably Discharged 17 Jan 1966


The Great Guys I Had Served With

Dear Fellow Marines,

Some years back, about 3:00 AM or so on a Christmas Morning, I found myself alone with thoughts of all the great guys I had served with while an infantryman with the 3rd Marines up around Vietnam's DMZ in '68... With special regard to those many who were lost in combat. And, yes, thoughts, too, of my parents (My father was a WW II Vet) who had passed on not so long ago... Depressing time, indeed...

Granted, I was tanked up on a six-pack of Guinness and found myself staring at an 'ole typewriter in the corner of the room. No computer in those days, so I pulled out the dusty ink cartridge, rammed a fresh one in place and, simply put, began writing whatever came to mind. As you can guess, I was in a bit of a stupor and the words flowed out as free as a new found breeze... Even found some humor in a bad situation...

The first thought, and memory, that came to mind before punching the keys was a childhood one. Each Easter our rather large family of eight would visit the gravesite of mom's brother, Ensign John J. McCourt, here at Long Island's Holy Rude Cemetery. At a very young age, I was fascinated by watching the sadness and total despair of others who were also there while my parents, especially my mom, went about business (Including prayer & tidying up the site) as happy as larks in a tree. It was as if they were aware of something few could comprehend. That her brother, a WW II Navy Fighter Pilot who had lost his life in the closing months of the war, and all the others were somehow, someway, O.K. That there was much, much, more to this life that has yet to be touched on or tapped into. And, of course, the enormous possibilities that "Do Exist"... To swipe a quote from Bobby Kennedy: "Some People Dream Of Things That Exist And Say, "Why...?" Others Dream Of That Which Does Not Exist And Say, "Why Not...?"

To make a long story a bit longer, thought I'd share, and enclose below, that story and the possibility (CARES) presented in the story's conclusion... Hope yourselves, and anyone else out there who has lost a loved one or friend, find some share of both hope and solace in the words. No doubt, some may think me quite the nut case but, screw it... I sometimes wonder if a teenager named Christopher Columbus was a bit tanked up (Not sure if Guinness existed in those days) while he stared through a telescope, watched the 50 foot mast of a sailing ship slowly sink into the horizon and came to realize that something out there was curved. By Golly...! The World Is Round...! And, of course, the most respected intellects of the time hung up on their "world is flat" definition wrote him off. At least for a while...

Do I believe that CARES represents a viable possibility...? And do I believe that some would think of the scenario as about as goof-ball, ridiculous and unbelieving as it can get...? The answer to both is yes... Do I really give a hoot what those representing the latter think...? Nope.

After all, "Even We Marines Can Get Philosophical at times."

Sincerest of regards & Semper Fidelis
(Always Faithful)
Mike Regan


Keepin' The Faith

A Marine Corps Christmas Story

The story regards a small group of Marines, haggard and tired from day's events, sitting at their jungle outpost as night approaches and attempting to find solace after the loss of friends in battle. Ceremony, designed to sooth, and which normally surrounds loss of those close to us is not to be. Mingling among family and friends at the wake, kind words from the preacher, the funeral procession to the cemetery for more kind words and capped off with roast turkey, drinks and even a bit of laughter as the pleasant memories take over. To be able to pay respect. In a proper way, to a friend. None of this was to be. Simply there one moment, with talk of the future and, of course, tales about the incredible babes back in "The World". And gone the next moment, with the unceremonious zipping of a body bag.

For reasons only an infantryman can fathom, the talk turns to the atom. It seems, according to one Marine, that everything as we know it, the wind, the rain, the hub cap off a '55 Chevy, even those of us, are made up of different combinations of only eighty some odd atoms. Each with its select number of electrons orbiting at various levels above a proton/neutron nucleus.

"Did ya' know?", he adds, "That the ratio of the nearest electron to its nucleus is greater in distance as compared to the earth from the sun." His friends are impressed. "Not only would you need a million atoms, piled on top of each other, to equal the thickness of a page, but to be able to compress the electrons into the nucleus would also mean that you could fit an entire sky-scraper into the eraser head of a pencil." Now his friends are amazed.

A few moments of silence... "Kinda' makes you wonder about the guys.", another Marine suggests. "I mean, if all those millions of bucks were spent to split a single atom, are they really dead? Seems to me that those electrons are still goin' through a spin cycle."

Discussion continues, cigarettes are smoked in cupped hands and, bingo, ARE is founded. Atomic Recovery Employment systems. Until someone pointed out that ---- ------- would be ticked off if recovered with the head of a moose. A brief, and respectful, moment of laughter, and they pondered some more.

To the scientist, there is the atom. To the theologian, there is spirit. To that young group of Marines, having found their solace, there is Comparable Atomic Recovery Employment systems. CARE.

"Geeeze...!!! Where Is Thomas Alva Edison When You Need Him...!!!"

Seeming to sum things up, one of the Marines who has remained silent throughout, simply listening, finally speaks. "You guys are gonna' think me wacko on this one, but when I was a kid my family went on a cross-country trip and at one point, I found myself in one of those rare moments in a large family. I was standing alone with my dad. We were at the very lip of the Grand Canyon, gazing at the incredible beauty, when he says to me, completely out of the blue, and we're not talking a religious fanatic here, "Ya' know, sport, I think this is what Jesus Christ had in mind when He said, probably in frustration, "The Kingdom of Heaven is here, now."

Heads nod, cigarettes are snuffed, and talk comes to an end as a Marine glances at his watch, stands with an M-16, and heads off to guard duty.

"Catch you guys later", he concludes.

Semper Fi,
Mike Regan
Infantry Squad Leader
Hotel Company
2nd Platoon
2nd Battalion
3rd Regiment
3rd Marine Division
Vietnam's DMZ
Christmas Day,
1968


Bumper Sticker Speech

Marine Corps Birthday Ball 2013

Sgt. Grit, I wanted to share this speech my father, GySgt Richard N. Steiner, gave during our 237th Marine Corps Birthday Ceremony. Attached is a photo of the Marines from Fox Co., 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marines Salt Lake City, UT, escorting the best birthday cake I've ever seen! You guys helped make this year's charity a success. Thank you for all your support Sgt! Semper Fi!

My son Jeff asked me to give a short talk on the Marine Corps Birthday. I thought I would do it with Marine Corps Bumper stickers. On November 10, 1775, the Marine Corps was founded in a small tavern in Philadelphia. The founders believed in "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Anybody Who Threatened It." They were determined that "America, be the Home of the Free Because of the Brave," and they were bound and determined to "Provide Enemies of America an Opportunity to Die for Their Country since 1775." Who here can tell me what day the US Army birthday is on? Or the US Navy? Or the Air Force? Or how about the French Foreign Legion? Other services don't celebrate their birthdays like we do.

Every year on November 10th there are hundreds of Marine Corps balls, and Marine Corps Birthday celebrations throughout America, in many of the other nations of this world, and even aboard US Ships on the seven seas. How many of the US services even celebrate their existence at all other than the United States Marine Corps? We, on the other hand, celebrate our service openly, proudly displaying the Eagle, Globe and Anchor and adorning our cars with unique bumper stickers reminding others and ourselves of who we are.

What makes the Marines different? In 1969, I was in the Ashau Valley, Vietnam, with "The 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, the Walking Dead". We were in the bush for 63 straight days, engaging the enemy every day. Part of our duty was to go through the personal effects of the dead NVA we found finding anything that would provide intel for us. I did a lot of that, and found that the NVA approached the Marine units in Vietnam entirely differently than other military units. The NVA respected them, but they feared Marine Corps units. They knew they could fragment many military units with relative ease, and that Marine Corps units were much harder to fragment, and the NVA needed much stronger firepower and more soldiers to fight against them. Marines know that hero's don't win wars, that armies do. We don't fragment. We know that the key to military success is teamwork. From the first day a Marine enters boot camp, he is taught to forget everything civilian he knows and how to become part of a team. Boot Camp is "Just Another Day in Paradise – USMC" and that "All Men are Created Equal,but a Few Become Marines." Marines win battles and wars because Marines follow orders, and follow them without question. To a Marine, the success of his unit is everything. There is plenty of room for heroics, but the welfare of his fire team, squad, platoon, company and battalion come first. We know that "Failure is Not an Option."

The Marines are a force to be feared. We believe "A Dead Enemy is a Peaceful Enemy, and Blessed be the Peacekeepers." We believe that "We are in the Azs Kicking Business and Business is Good." We believe that you "Should Not Wish Ill for Your Enemy, but Should Plan It." In terms of battle strategy Marines believe "Gun Control is Hitting Your Target" that "When in Doubt, Empty the Magazine" that "Happiness is a Belt-fed Weapon" and we believe that "Artillery Brings Dignity to What Would Otherwise Just Be a Brawl."

On a more serious note Marines always live in the shadow of death. Every Marine knows that death may be required of him to protect the other men of his unit, and to ensure victory to the battle. Marines don't pray for their own safety, they pray for the strength to do their job. That, folks, is what makes us different. Marines are "Brothers to the End", we believe that "Death Smiles at Everyone, but Marines Smile Back" We also firmly believe that "He Who Shed Blood With Me Shall Forever Be My Brother" that "All Give Some, and Some Give All" and that "There is No Such Thing as a Former Marine." That is why we are here tonight.

Marines don't question whether wars or police actions are right or wrong. We simply carry out the wishes of those who make those decisions. "People Sleep Peacefully In Their Beds at Night Because Rough Men Stand Ready To Do Violence On Their Behalf." We know that in many instances "America Is Not At War, America's Military Is At War. America Is At The Mall". We know that "Pacifism is a Luxury Paid For By Warriors" and that "Patriotic Dissent Is A Luxury Of Those Protected By Better Men Than They." But we also know "You Only Have The Rights You Are Willing To Fight For", and we understand to the fullest that "For Those Who Fought For It, Freedom Has A Flavor The Protected Will Never Know".

Marines are a special breed. We know "Some People Spend An Entire Lifetime Wondering If They Made A Difference. The Marines Don't Have That Problem." We know that America is "One Nation Under God and His Marines Standing Guard." Marines know that "Once a Marine. Always A Marine" and that "Semper Fidelis Is Not Just a Saying, It Is a Way Of Life". When all is over, and said and done a Marine can say "You Will Die, but I Will Die A Marine"

To this we say "Oohrah... It's a Marine thang". Semper Fi. Let the Birthday Celebration begin.

Jeff Steiner


Old M-1's

Sgt. Grit,

I have a request. Our local "Korean" Honor Guard that performs at many occasions... But mainly Military Funerals has a BIG one.

Their OLD M-1 rifles have become UN-useable, they no longer fire and therefore not allowing the final gun salute.

Could you put the word out and help me in finding about 6 to 8 still workable M-1's.

These are some of the Greatest Service men doing so much for our departing Military people.

Thank You, Ernie Brindley USMC
1962-1966 Vietnam Vet
Contact: ernie237[at]embarqmail.com


Capture The Envelope

Some of us are old enough to remember 'Air Mail'... supposedly faster, more expensive stamps, lighter weight stationery that was 'special' for Air Mail (mostly marketing... might have mattered when air mail pilots were still wearing goggles in their biplanes... by the sixties, lots of 'air mail' was flying in fast trucks...) DI's might launch such a letter into the air... and woe be too he who did not successfully capture the envelope whilst it was airborne. There were other abbreviations, intended to be 'cutesy' that would show up from time to time. "DDL DSDB" being one in particular that called for a letter back asking for an interpretation. Turned out, it was for "Deliver De Letter, De Sooner De Better"... SWAK could also lead to a question from the DI... "does this mean 'swabbed with a (common feminine hygiene product, trade-marked, begins with a "K")... and you expect ME to handle this, maggot?". Once caught a smuggling operation that involved a recruit who got a lot of mail... every day, sometimes two a day from the same correspondent... ordinary looking letters, nothing to draw attention on the outside of the envelope... just happened to feel some stiffness in the envelope, different from a stick of gum... had the recipient open it on the spot... he and his main squeeze were well along in the process of moving a 52-card deck of playing cards into MCRD... one card at a time... (don't think it was the poser who claimed to have played cards with his DI, tho...) Worst thing about gum was the foil wrapper... "I didn't say un-wrap it, sh-t-for-brains... I said CHEW it!"... foil, in contact with dental fillings, generates an electrical current... and that hurts... more fillings, more pain... So, if you were at ease enough to watch the DI handle the mail... and noticed that he seemed to flex envelopes a bit... now you know why!

Ddick


Reunions

MEGA

The Marine Embassy Guard Association will be holding their Annual Reunion in Providence, RI on June 3rd through June 7th, 2015.

For Information, go to embassymarine.org.

Semper Fi,
Denny Krause
Sgt. "62 - "68


Lost and Found

Looking for John Champion, Brownsville, TX. Korea 1954 to 1955, MACS-3 or any other GRUNT.

Cpl. Paul Dougherty USMC


Short Rounds

"How do I leave positive feedback for my recent order? My shirt brought memories and pride, got to me fast, and I just want to say that one of the Marines' mottos is "First to fight." Yours should be "First to deliver!" Outstanding job. I will be a repeat customer."

Paul B.


Jim asked if anyone ever was on the USS Walker Troop Ship. Myself and 5000 other Marines were on our way to Korea. Landed at Inchon Port back then. We also used the rope ladder to disembark. We used barges to come ashore.


According to Wikipedia there have been 19 men awarded two medals of honor. Of these 14 were for two separate actions.

See the attached link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Two-time_Medal_of_Honor_recipients

One of the most notable was Tom Custer, brother of George Custer. Tom was killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Jim Grimes


Quotes

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
--Theodore Roosevelt


"[I]f industry and labour are left to take their own course, they will generally be directed to those objects which are the most productive, and this in a more certain and direct manner than the wisdom of the most enlightened legislature could point out."
--James Madison, 1789


"The battle of Iwo Island has been won. The United States Marines by their individual and collective courage have conquered a base which is as necessary to us in our continuing forward movement toward final victory as it was vital to the enemy in staving off ultimate defeat. By their victory, the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions and other units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps have made an accounting to their country which only history will be able to value fully. Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."
--Admiral Chester W. Nimitz


"History, in general, only informs us what bad government is."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1807


"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a h-ll of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it's quite fun to fight them, you know. It's a h-ll of a hoot. It's fun to shoot some people. I'll be right up there with you. I like brawling."
--James Mattis


"Who is that tapping on my door?, I can't hear you turd!"

"Assume the dead bug position!" "Ready fall!" "Get down & Get up!"

"Get your little red books out & put it up to your face!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 09 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Corps Emblem
• Vision 2 Victory
• Carlson's Raiders

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The 2014 MACS-2, 5th Reunion was hosted by Cpl & Mrs. Clark McCormack at their Summer Home on the shore of Lake Jefferson, in Cleveland, Minnesota, from 25 thru 27 July 2014... MACS-2, MAG-13, 1st Marine Brigade, FMFPAC, Kaneohe Bay. We served during 1958-1962.

Clark McCormack, Don Spann, Carl Dubac, James Spinner, Tom Lutz, Dennis Skiffington, Dick McMahon, Bill Muckler, & Pete Kristall.

Pete Kristall


Marine Corps Emblem

This past weekend my wife and I were driving to the beach to take a walk. On the way we hit some metal at the side of the road and it tore a chunk out of my right rear tire. I drove carefully to a boat ramp about 60 yards away, so that I would be off the road and have room for the tire to be changed. I was calling AAA when a pickup pulling a boat came up the ramp and stopped. Fellow in his 40's jumped out and said I will change that for you. He said he saw the Marine Corps emblem on my car, (thanks to Sgt. Grit) and that is why he stopped. His father was in the Corps, as was his brother and his wife's father. He apologized that he did not join the Corps as he went right into the police academy after college and is still a police officer. To add a little more to this tale as were talking as he was leaving it turned out that I served on our local police department with his wife's father, and he knew my oldest two boys who had served as officers in this town and the town he works in.

Larry Whalen, Cpl. 1951-54

Check out our wide selection of Marine Corps POV Decals!


Ice Hole

Sgt. Grit,

Since there seems to be an NTC discussion going on, I'll have to put in my 10 cents worth (cost of living increase from 2 cents). I was sent TAD on two separate occasions, the first in January, 1953 to Yeoman "B" school, a 10 week course in Gregg Simplified Shorthand. I was a Sergeant (E4), just with 4 years service; the class makeup was all Marines, including 2 WMs, instructors were a Chief and a 1st Class. Surprisingly enough, I managed to finish and wound up with a secondary MOS of 0121; recorded 2 Special Courts Martial, as I recall.

A shorthand exercise the Chief gave us once was how to catch bears in Maine: You have to wait until winter when the lakes all freeze over (you are only going to catch the dumb bears, the smart ones are hibernating); next you cut a hole in the ice, take a can of peas and line the hole and wait for the bear to show up; then when the bear comes up to take a pea, you run up behind him and kick him in the ice hole.

The second time was over 12 years later; I was stationed at MCAS, Yuma, AZ, assigned to H&HS, working at Base Headquarters. I had been promoted to SSgt (E5) in early 1957, got caught up in the reclassification and wound up as a Sgt (E5) until 1966. CO was Col. Joe McGlothlin and XO LtCol Wilson Terry.

My second trip to NTC in 1965 was to Motion Picture Operator School; the Station operator was transferred and so I was selected to go to school again. Since I was one of the few Marines at NTC, it became my "privilege" to conduct close order drill for the platoons of Navy personnel waiting to go into the mess hall. Talk about the proverbial Chinese Fire Drill, these clowns had trouble knowing which foot was their left and which was their right. It was interesting, to say the least.

After returning to Yuma, I got to operate the projector for a lot of private "R" rated films for the CO and his guests, in addition to movies at the Base Theater.

Semper Fi,
James R. McMahon
GySgt of Marines (1949-1970)
Hendersonville, TN


Vision 2 Victory

Sgt Grit and Staff were recently honored with a visit by Marine Veteran Derek Hendershot. Derek is on the Board of Directors for the Vision 2 Victory program. This program is led and operated by military veterans. Following the completion of the Wall of Remembrance by Marine Veteran David Brown, which bares the names of all servicemen and women that have been KIA since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism, Derek was tasked with touring the 2nd generation Wall all over the country.

Now that the touring of the Wall of Remembrance is drawing to a close, this team of motivated Veterans have begun fundraising to upgrade the current Wall before next year's tour kicks off. The upgrades will include replicas of the Twin Towers with iPads to allow visitors to easily access the names on the wall, to include adding LED lighting to create two towers of light at night. More images will be added to the entrance to include a wind screen mural of combat scenes, five battlefield crosses that are specific to each branch with their corresponding branch flags, as well as the POW/MIA and U.S. Flag. The names of the fallen from 1983 to present day will be added to the Wall. Yes, that means that the names of the fallen from Beirut, Desert Storm/Shield, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Iraq will all travel across the country. To top it all off, they will add a Close Encounters booth. The booth will display internet size video clips of the fallen submitted by their families and friends.

We are so glad that Derek chose to stop by en route back to Sacramento, CA, where the 2nd generation Wall of Remembrance will be retired between 10-12 November, 2014. Visit the Vision 2 Victory website, to find out about upcoming events and how you can contribute towards the 3rd generation Wall of Remembrance.

Semper Fi!


Carlson's Raiders

Grit,

I have to make a correction to my statement, Lt. Col. Carlson was embedded with the Chinese Communist after The China Marines left China who used the term Gung Ho (all together) fighting the Japanese. He was not a Communist, a devote Christian based on Socialism. This aroused suspicion in the Marine Corps. He left the Corps in 1939, in 1941 he used his White House Connections thru Capt. James Roosevelt USMC Reserves to re-enlist.

President Roosevelt had wanted a Unit somewhat like the British Commandos, At the start of World War Two, The Marine Corps did not want a Guerrilla role. First Raider Battalion formed on East Coast February 16, 1942 under Lt. Col. Merritt A. Edson, Second Raider Battalion formed on West Coast February 19, 1942 under Lt. Col. Evans F. Carlson. Both were in First Marine Division Para Marines formed up in 1940. East Coast trained at Lake Hurst N. J., West Coast trained at Camp Elliot, CA.

They were later merged into both Raider Battalions, so some Raiders were actually qualified as both. (Ira Hayes and Harlan Block flag raisers on Iwo Jima were both ).

Lt. Col. Edson led the First Raiders in the landings at Guadalcanal on August 7, 1942. Ten days later Lt. Col. Carlson and Maj. Roosevelt raided Makin Island with six Rifle Company's aboard Submarines from Hawaii, the Argonaut with Lt. Col. Carlson and 121 Marines, the Nautilus with Maj. Roosevelt with 90 Marines aboard, from the Second Raider Battalion. After returning to Hawaii the Second Raider Battalion later also landed at Guadalcanal, Lt. Col. Carlson leading the longest march. In 1944 the Raiders were disband all going to different Divisions in the Corps.

Ron Morse; I know the book title is Merritt's Raiders however The Raiders were and still are known as Carlson's Raiders as it was his concept how they trained and fought.

MGYSGT W. Schroeder
XX19137


Lifers

Sgt. Grit,

I graduated boot camp on October 9, 1964, fifty years ago. Memory of it is just as vivid now as it was then. November 10, 2014 I will celebrate my 50th Marine Corps Birthday (Camp Lejeune 2nd Marine Division parade & cake cutting was my first in November 1964). And again, the memory is vivid. Now, I know that there are many of my fellow Marines who have celebrated more USMC birthdays than I have, and I read intently the stories that they write. To them, I'm a boot. I will probably be boot to someone for as long the almighty sees fit not to call me home. I'm simply pondering how quickly the years have zipped by and how honored I feel to be a Marine.

One other subject I have been pondering. As a young PFC with Bravo Co. 1st Bn. 6th Marines, I knew and planned that I would make a career of the Marine Corps. My fellow Marines had a name for those of us who had made that choice. They called us "lifers". They would also joke about my coffee cup finger having the same hook as the company Gunny's. I never tried to deny that I intended to stay in the Marine Corps to at least get promoted to GySgt.

I frequently have the opportunity to talk to Marines of many eras who didn't stay past four years. Interestingly enough, all of them say they wish they had stayed for 20 years. And many of them are just as loyal and dedicated to the Marine Corps as they were when they were on active duty. I frequently see Marine Corps stickers on cars, trucks, and vans driven by Marines who didn't stay for twenty years. Their love of the "Corps" is just as strong as it was when they were on active duty. So, what it boils down to is that I think that all Marines are "lifers" in their own way. Peer pressure is a powerful force.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC (Ret)


Don't Try It On A Marine

In reading the letter about the helo pilot that went off on his own to fight the VC, I was reminded of one I met at a B&B on Veterans day a couple of years ago.

This man told how he never finished boot camp as he was so good at unarmed combat that he was pulled out for assignment to some special secret unit. He was first sent to jungle training and upon completion of that was flown to MCRD SD and sent into a mile long Quonset hut filled with weapons and told to take his pick. He was then sent straight to RVN and turned loose on the enemy. Upon return to ConUS he was medically retired due to wounds received. Never received care as no one ever told him he could go to the VA. There were two other couples there also and to save his wife any embarrassment I remained quiet although it was not easy. You may bullsh-t AF and Navy guys but don't try it on another Marine.

SSgt Joe
RVN 66 & 67


Once A Marine, Always A Marine

Recently, on October 2nd, 2014, former talk show host, Marine and Navy veteran Montel Williams was interviewed by Fox News about his testimony in a DC hearing concerning Marine Sgt Andrew Tahmooressi who has been jailed in Mexico for over 6-months.

View the interview at: fxn.ws/1ugebAP.


Major Carlson

Sgt Grit,

Subject: Gung Ho

As I am now 76, with a memory retention of about fifteen seconds, after reading J.J. Lopez' "correction", I reread the book.

The following information in the book was all confirmed on Google.

Major Carlson spent eighteen (18) months embedded with the Eight Route Army of the Chinese Communists. On his return, he wrote a book about his experience with the Communists called: Twin Stars over China (the book is still available). Publishing the book got him a severe reprimand from the Marine Corps.

His career was saved by James Roosevelt, son of FDR. James later became a Captain in the Raiders. GUNG HO was the battle cry of the Chines troops. He later confirmed this to his Raider Bn. Carlson's son, Captain Carlson, was a contributor to the book in question: Carlson's Raid, The Daring Marine Assault on Makin Island by George W. Smith

No mention of the "Chinese Marines...

Bill McDermott
180xxxx
Dress blues, tennis shoes, and a light coat of oil...


Marine Corps Response To Terrorist Threats

The Marine Corps' response to terrorist threats: Threat assessed... Target acquired... Target Elimatated... Awaiting Next Target!


Iwakuni

Memories of Iwakuni, I was stationed at Iwakuni 1955 - 56 - 57, a real long time ago. If I recall, block 8 was with a small flower garden in the center and the rooms were around it two stories high. The mess hall was run by the navy I think. The slipway was where some PT boats were kept. The navy had PBY's that used the water to land. At the base Australian Air Force was stationed, remember how they practiced landing with one prop engine shut down etc. Myself, I worked off base at the Otake supply center along with a Pfc and 2 Japanese nationals, a small forklift shop, and there were many machines. There were two gates to the base, the main and a small back gate that most of the nationals used besides the Marines. If I recall, out the main gate on the drag strip was a restaurant and bar called the Texas Steak House, it was said that it was run by someone who took a discharge in Japan. I believe in early '56 the order came down for all enlisted dependents to go back stateside.

Well this brought back a lot when I read the post about Iwakuni from an old Marine, but still a Marine!

Sgt. (ski) Nowicki


USMC Football

I too was at the Football game mentioned in the 10/2 newsletter. I also was at MCRD San Diego from Sept to Dec 1961, but in Platoon 175. The game was between the San Diego Chargers and the USMC team, and was held at Balboa stadium which was the Chargers home field at that time. Balboa stadium stood next to San Diego HS on the east side of downtown. Do not remember and details of the game as I was pre-occupied with enjoying the fleeting freedom. I also remember (I think) that it was only sailors and Marines in attendance. Also it was grey and cold. Probably about Thanksgiving timeframe. This also was the ONLY non-training event that I ever saw during boot!

Wayne Mailhiot 1980XXX
MCRDSD Plt. 175 C Co. 1st BN. RTR Sept 1961-Dec. 1961
C Co. 1st BN., 2nd ITR, Camp Pendleton Dec 14- Feb 2, 1962
H-3-11 2531 Fld. Radio operator Camp Pendleton Mar. 1962-Feb 1963
Comm-Elect School Bn. Mar 1963-Jan 1964
6641 Aviation Radar Technician AN/TPS37 MACS 1 MCAS Yuma, AZ Jan 1964-Dec 1964
TAD Comm-Elect School Bn. Dec 1964-Mar 1965
5941 Aviation Radar Technician AN/TPS34 MACS 1 MCAS Yuma, AZ Mar 1965-Jan 1966
Honorably Discharged 17 Jan 1966


The Great Guys I Had Served With

Dear Fellow Marines,

Some years back, about 3:00 AM or so on a Christmas Morning, I found myself alone with thoughts of all the great guys I had served with while an infantryman with the 3rd Marines up around Vietnam's DMZ in '68... With special regard to those many who were lost in combat. And, yes, thoughts, too, of my parents (My father was a WW II Vet) who had passed on not so long ago... Depressing time, indeed...

Granted, I was tanked up on a six-pack of Guinness and found myself staring at an 'ole typewriter in the corner of the room. No computer in those days, so I pulled out the dusty ink cartridge, rammed a fresh one in place and, simply put, began writing whatever came to mind. As you can guess, I was in a bit of a stupor and the words flowed out as free as a new found breeze... Even found some humor in a bad situation...

The first thought, and memory, that came to mind before punching the keys was a childhood one. Each Easter our rather large family of eight would visit the gravesite of mom's brother, Ensign John J. McCourt, here at Long Island's Holy Rude Cemetery. At a very young age, I was fascinated by watching the sadness and total despair of others who were also there while my parents, especially my mom, went about business (Including prayer & tidying up the site) as happy as larks in a tree. It was as if they were aware of something few could comprehend. That her brother, a WW II Navy Fighter Pilot who had lost his life in the closing months of the war, and all the others were somehow, someway, O.K. That there was much, much, more to this life that has yet to be touched on or tapped into. And, of course, the enormous possibilities that "Do Exist"... To swipe a quote from Bobby Kennedy: "Some People Dream Of Things That Exist And Say, "Why...?" Others Dream Of That Which Does Not Exist And Say, "Why Not...?"

To make a long story a bit longer, thought I'd share, and enclose below, that story and the possibility (CARES) presented in the story's conclusion... Hope yourselves, and anyone else out there who has lost a loved one or friend, find some share of both hope and solace in the words. No doubt, some may think me quite the nut case but, screw it... I sometimes wonder if a teenager named Christopher Columbus was a bit tanked up (Not sure if Guinness existed in those days) while he stared through a telescope, watched the 50 foot mast of a sailing ship slowly sink into the horizon and came to realize that something out there was curved. By Golly...! The World Is Round...! And, of course, the most respected intellects of the time hung up on their "world is flat" definition wrote him off. At least for a while...

Do I believe that CARES represents a viable possibility...? And do I believe that some would think of the scenario as about as goof-ball, ridiculous and unbelieving as it can get...? The answer to both is yes... Do I really give a hoot what those representing the latter think...? Nope.

After all, "Even We Marines Can Get Philosophical at times."

Sincerest of regards & Semper Fidelis
(Always Faithful)
Mike Regan


Keepin' The Faith

A Marine Corps Christmas Story

The story regards a small group of Marines, haggard and tired from day's events, sitting at their jungle outpost as night approaches and attempting to find solace after the loss of friends in battle. Ceremony, designed to sooth, and which normally surrounds loss of those close to us is not to be. Mingling among family and friends at the wake, kind words from the preacher, the funeral procession to the cemetery for more kind words and capped off with roast turkey, drinks and even a bit of laughter as the pleasant memories take over. To be able to pay respect. In a proper way, to a friend. None of this was to be. Simply there one moment, with talk of the future and, of course, tales about the incredible babes back in "The World". And gone the next moment, with the unceremonious zipping of a body bag.

For reasons only an infantryman can fathom, the talk turns to the atom. It seems, according to one Marine, that everything as we know it, the wind, the rain, the hub cap off a '55 Chevy, even those of us, are made up of different combinations of only eighty some odd atoms. Each with its select number of electrons orbiting at various levels above a proton/neutron nucleus.

"Did ya' know?", he adds, "That the ratio of the nearest electron to its nucleus is greater in distance as compared to the earth from the sun." His friends are impressed. "Not only would you need a million atoms, piled on top of each other, to equal the thickness of a page, but to be able to compress the electrons into the nucleus would also mean that you could fit an entire sky-scraper into the eraser head of a pencil." Now his friends are amazed.

A few moments of silence... "Kinda' makes you wonder about the guys.", another Marine suggests. "I mean, if all those millions of bucks were spent to split a single atom, are they really dead? Seems to me that those electrons are still goin' through a spin cycle."

Discussion continues, cigarettes are smoked in cupped hands and, bingo, ARE is founded. Atomic Recovery Employment systems. Until someone pointed out that ---- ------- would be ticked off if recovered with the head of a moose. A brief, and respectful, moment of laughter, and they pondered some more.

To the scientist, there is the atom. To the theologian, there is spirit. To that young group of Marines, having found their solace, there is Comparable Atomic Recovery Employment systems. CARE.

"Geeeze...!!! Where Is Thomas Alva Edison When You Need Him...!!!"

Seeming to sum things up, one of the Marines who has remained silent throughout, simply listening, finally speaks. "You guys are gonna' think me wacko on this one, but when I was a kid my family went on a cross-country trip and at one point, I found myself in one of those rare moments in a large family. I was standing alone with my dad. We were at the very lip of the Grand Canyon, gazing at the incredible beauty, when he says to me, completely out of the blue, and we're not talking a religious fanatic here, "Ya' know, sport, I think this is what Jesus Christ had in mind when He said, probably in frustration, "The Kingdom of Heaven is here, now."

Heads nod, cigarettes are snuffed, and talk comes to an end as a Marine glances at his watch, stands with an M-16, and heads off to guard duty.

"Catch you guys later", he concludes.

Semper Fi,
Mike Regan
Infantry Squad Leader
Hotel Company
2nd Platoon
2nd Battalion
3rd Regiment
3rd Marine Division
Vietnam's DMZ
Christmas Day,
1968


Bumper Sticker Speech

Sgt. Grit, I wanted to share this speech my father, GySgt Richard N. Steiner, gave during our 237th Marine Corps Birthday Ceremony. Attached is a photo of the Marines from Fox Co., 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marines Salt Lake City, UT, escorting the best birthday cake I've ever seen! You guys helped make this year's charity a success. Thank you for all your support Sgt! Semper Fi!

My son Jeff asked me to give a short talk on the Marine Corps Birthday. I thought I would do it with Marine Corps Bumper stickers. On November 10, 1775, the Marine Corps was founded in a small tavern in Philadelphia. The founders believed in "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Anybody Who Threatened It." They were determined that "America, be the Home of the Free Because of the Brave," and they were bound and determined to "Provide Enemies of America an Opportunity to Die for Their Country since 1775." Who here can tell me what day the US Army birthday is on? Or the US Navy? Or the Air Force? Or how about the French Foreign Legion? Other services don't celebrate their birthdays like we do.

Every year on November 10th there are hundreds of Marine Corps balls, and Marine Corps Birthday celebrations throughout America, in many of the other nations of this world, and even aboard US Ships on the seven seas. How many of the US services even celebrate their existence at all other than the United States Marine Corps? We, on the other hand, celebrate our service openly, proudly displaying the Eagle, Globe and Anchor and adorning our cars with unique bumper stickers reminding others and ourselves of who we are.

What makes the Marines different? In 1969, I was in the Ashau Valley, Vietnam, with "The 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, the Walking Dead". We were in the bush for 63 straight days, engaging the enemy every day. Part of our duty was to go through the personal effects of the dead NVA we found finding anything that would provide intel for us. I did a lot of that, and found that the NVA approached the Marine units in Vietnam entirely differently than other military units. The NVA respected them, but they feared Marine Corps units. They knew they could fragment many military units with relative ease, and that Marine Corps units were much harder to fragment, and the NVA needed much stronger firepower and more soldiers to fight against them. Marines know that hero's don't win wars, that armies do. We don't fragment. We know that the key to military success is teamwork. From the first day a Marine enters boot camp, he is taught to forget everything civilian he knows and how to become part of a team. Boot Camp is "Just Another Day in Paradise – USMC" and that "All Men are Created Equal,but a Few Become Marines." Marines win battles and wars because Marines follow orders, and follow them without question. To a Marine, the success of his unit is everything. There is plenty of room for heroics, but the welfare of his fire team, squad, platoon, company and battalion come first. We know that "Failure is Not an Option."

The Marines are a force to be feared. We believe "A Dead Enemy is a Peaceful Enemy, and Blessed be the Peacekeepers." We believe that "We are in the Azs Kicking Business and Business is Good." We believe that you "Should Not Wish Ill for Your Enemy, but Should Plan It." In terms of battle strategy Marines believe "Gun Control is Hitting Your Target" that "When in Doubt, Empty the Magazine" that "Happiness is a Belt-fed Weapon" and we believe that "Artillery Brings Dignity to What Would Otherwise Just Be a Brawl."

On a more serious note Marines always live in the shadow of death. Every Marine knows that death may be required of him to protect the other men of his unit, and to ensure victory to the battle. Marines don't pray for their own safety, they pray for the strength to do their job. That, folks, is what makes us different. Marines are "Brothers to the End", we believe that "Death Smiles at Everyone, but Marines Smile Back" We also firmly believe that "He Who Shed Blood With Me Shall Forever Be My Brother" that "All Give Some, and Some Give All" and that "There is No Such Thing as a Former Marine." That is why we are here tonight.

Marines don't question whether wars or police actions are right or wrong. We simply carry out the wishes of those who make those decisions. "People Sleep Peacefully In Their Beds at Night Because Rough Men Stand Ready To Do Violence On Their Behalf." We know that in many instances "America Is Not At War, America's Military Is At War. America Is At The Mall". We know that "Pacifism is a Luxury Paid For By Warriors" and that "Patriotic Dissent Is A Luxury Of Those Protected By Better Men Than They." But we also know "You Only Have The Rights You Are Willing To Fight For", and we understand to the fullest that "For Those Who Fought For It, Freedom Has A Flavor The Protected Will Never Know".

Marines are a special breed. We know "Some People Spend An Entire Lifetime Wondering If They Made A Difference. The Marines Don't Have That Problem." We know that America is "One Nation Under God and His Marines Standing Guard." Marines know that "Once a Marine. Always A Marine" and that "Semper Fidelis Is Not Just a Saying, It Is a Way Of Life". When all is over, and said and done a Marine can say "You Will Die, but I Will Die A Marine"

To this we say "Oohrah... It's a Marine thang". Semper Fi. Let the Birthday Celebration begin.

Jeff Steiner


Old M-1's

Sgt. Grit,

I have a request. Our local "Korean" Honor Guard that performs at many occasions... But mainly Military Funerals has a BIG one.

Their OLD M-1 rifles have become UN-useable, they no longer fire and therefore not allowing the final gun salute.

Could you put the word out and help me in finding about 6 to 8 still workable M-1's.

These are some of the Greatest Service men doing so much for our departing Military people.

Thank You, Ernie Brindley USMC
1962-1966 Vietnam Vet
Contact: ernie237[at]embarqmail.com


Capture The Envelope

Some of us are old enough to remember 'Air Mail'... supposedly faster, more expensive stamps, lighter weight stationery that was 'special' for Air Mail (mostly marketing... might have mattered when air mail pilots were still wearing goggles in their biplanes... by the sixties, lots of 'air mail' was flying in fast trucks...) DI's might launch such a letter into the air... and woe be too he who did not successfully capture the envelope whilst it was airborne. There were other abbreviations, intended to be 'cutesy' that would show up from time to time. "DDL DSDB" being one in particular that called for a letter back asking for an interpretation. Turned out, it was for "Deliver De Letter, De Sooner De Better"... SWAK could also lead to a question from the DI... "does this mean 'swabbed with a (common feminine hygiene product, trade-marked, begins with a "K")... and you expect ME to handle this, maggot?". Once caught a smuggling operation that involved a recruit who got a lot of mail... every day, sometimes two a day from the same correspondent... ordinary looking letters, nothing to draw attention on the outside of the envelope... just happened to feel some stiffness in the envelope, different from a stick of gum... had the recipient open it on the spot... he and his main squeeze were well along in the process of moving a 52-card deck of playing cards into MCRD... one card at a time... (don't think it was the poser who claimed to have played cards with his DI, tho...) Worst thing about gum was the foil wrapper... "I didn't say un-wrap it, sh-t-for-brains... I said CHEW it!"... foil, in contact with dental fillings, generates an electrical current... and that hurts... more fillings, more pain... So, if you were at ease enough to watch the DI handle the mail... and noticed that he seemed to flex envelopes a bit... now you know why!

Ddick


Reunions

MEGA

The Marine Embassy Guard Association will be holding their Annual Reunion in Providence, RI on June 3rd through June 7th, 2015.

For Information, go to embassymarine.org.

Semper Fi,
Denny Krause
Sgt. "62 - "68


Lost and Found

Looking for John Champion, Brownsville, TX. Korea 1954 to 1955, MACS-3 or any other GRUNT.

Cpl. Paul Dougherty USMC


Short Rounds

"How do I leave positive feedback for my recent order? My shirt brought memories and pride, got to me fast, and I just want to say that one of the Marines' mottos is "First to fight." Yours should be "First to deliver!" Outstanding job. I will be a repeat customer."

Paul B.


Jim asked if anyone ever was on the USS Walker Troop Ship. Myself and 5000 other Marines were on our way to Korea. Landed at Inchon Port back then. We also used the rope ladder to disembark. We used barges to come ashore.


According to Wikipedia there have been 19 men awarded two medals of honor. Of these 14 were for two separate actions.

See the attached link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Two-time_Medal_of_Honor_recipients

One of the most notable was Tom Custer, brother of George Custer. Tom was killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Jim Grimes


Quotes

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
--Theodore Roosevelt


"[I]f industry and labour are left to take their own course, they will generally be directed to those objects which are the most productive, and this in a more certain and direct manner than the wisdom of the most enlightened legislature could point out."
--James Madison, 1789


"The battle of Iwo Island has been won. The United States Marines by their individual and collective courage have conquered a base which is as necessary to us in our continuing forward movement toward final victory as it was vital to the enemy in staving off ultimate defeat. By their victory, the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions and other units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps have made an accounting to their country which only history will be able to value fully. Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."
--Admiral Chester W. Nimitz


"History, in general, only informs us what bad government is."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1807


"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a h-ll of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it's quite fun to fight them, you know. It's a h-ll of a hoot. It's fun to shoot some people. I'll be right up there with you. I like brawling."
--James Mattis


"Who is that tapping on my door?, I can't hear you turd!"

"Assume the dead bug position!" "Ready fall!" "Get down & Get up!"

"Get your little red books out & put it up to your face!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 02 OCT 2014

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Great Grandson 1st Class Elijah in blues

Sgt. Grit,

On March 5, 1964, I became One of The Few, One of The Proud, A United States Marine. 50 years later, and with a little help from Sgt. Grit, I would like to Present My Great-Grandson 1st Class Elijah James Yezzo... Semper Fi! Gung Ho...

Robert Sabolchick

Get this awesome set at:

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set


Smiling As I Write

Wake Up Call For The Swabs: This is regarding the submission from Sgt. Grit about the Navy boot camp being next to MCRD in the '60s. Ddick was talking about "triggers" and this was really one for me.

One morning toward the end of 1960 at about 0'dark-thirty we were marched to the fence at the end of the run way separating MCRD from the Navy boot camp and ordered to sing at the top of lungs our most revered hymn. The Swabs were all still nestled in their racks and as we sang the lights started to come on and they began shouting. Our bandy rooster junior DI was marching back and forth in front of the platoon pumping his arm (Full Metal Jacket) and singing along with us his favorite song. The Swabs were totally p-ssed but we were exhilarated for the rest of the day! I'm smiling as I write this!

Cpl. Selders
MCRD '60


Phantoms Forever

I was an ordnanceman on the F4 in 1975. The F-4's that were stationed at MCAS El Toro, CA were F-4 N's and RF-4 B's. None of which were in camouflage. All of them were a shiny gray color with colorful squadron logo's and call letters displayed on their tails. I transferred to Beaufort, SC in 1977 where the F-4 squadrons all flew F-4 J models. Those F-4's were all painted the same way. In 1978, right after the movie "The Great Santini" aka "The Ace" starring Robert Duvall was recorded in Beaufort, I joined the Checkerboards, VMFA-312, the squadron portrait in the movie. We did a West-Pac tour in 1979 and we either started to swap out our F-4 J's to F-4 Super J's after that West-Pac or the following one. The F-4 Super J's and then soon after, F-4 S's were painted a flat gray/blue camouflage. This was the first of my knowledge that the F-4 Phantom was painted in a camouflage scheme and stayed that way until they were retired.

I was fortunate to go on to Yuma, AZ assigned to VMFAT-101 and continue with the F-4's after an instructor assignment at NAS Memphis, TN. While in Yuma, we started to send the F-4's to mothballs prior to the Squadron moving to MCAS El Toro and transition to F-18's. I then transferred to an A-4 squadron VMA-211 to do another West-Pac and assist in the squadron transfer from MCAS El Toro to MCAS Yuma via the West-Pac tour. Soon after we returned from West-Pac, I was reassigned to MWWU-3 for 42 months before I received orders to the last Marine F-4 squadron. In 1991, I was assigned to VMFA-112, known as the Dallas Cowboys at NAS Dallas, TX. It was great to be back with Phantom again.

Unfortunately, the F-4 Phantom was retired from the Marine Corps a year and a half before I was. The F-4 Phantom retired from the Marine Corps in 1993 at NAS Dallas, TX. In 1995, I followed close behind. A lot of my blood and sweat were left on many a F-4 and it was an honor to serve as many years as I did with all of them, but most of all, all of my Marine brothers and sisters that I was also honored to have worked with. IYAOYAS!

Daemon R, "Doc" Butts
GySgt USMC Ret.
1975-1995
VMFA-531, VMFP-3, VMFA-451, VMFA-312, VMFAT-101, VMA-211 and VMFA-112


Old Corps King Diner Mug


Dangerously Gung Ho Lieutenant

I was in my 12th month in Nam, dreaming of that freedom bird. 1970 and Charlie 1/5 was working in the Khe Son mountains. We had been out humping the boonies for about 3/4 days and a chopper drops off the new 1st platoon lieutenant.

He was green as grass and dangerously gung ho. As the platoon sergeant it was up to me to try and educate this guy before he got a bunch of us wounded or worse.

We were scheduled for a patrol through an area that the day before gave up a cache of Chicom weapons, rockets, grenades and a few American M-60s. I would love to know how those guns wound up in that cave. Anyway, we were all a little on edge anyway and now we have to deal with "John Wayne" as our new looey.

We spent the morning snooping and pooping going up and down well used trails. Everyone is on high alert. The point man finds a booby trapped grenade. The new lieutenant grabs the grenade and winds up like Bob Gibson ready to throw a fast ball. I screamed at him to stop. He did. I then tried to explain to him that the VC will take the delay out of a booby trapped grenade so the detonation is almost immediate. He is adamant that he is going to toss that grenade. WTF. I backed the rest of the platoon away from any kill zone. The man tosses out the grenade and it immediately blows tearing a hole in his arm. He lucked out. He should have been killed.

Now for the good part of the story. We called in a medevac. The ground was too steep for the bird to land. The crew chief tossed out a stretcher that was designed to winch into the chopper. We had never seen one of these. It took a while, but we finally got the lieutenant secured into the stretcher. Just as my radio man brought over the ring to secure the stretcher to the chopper, we looked at each other, smiled, and hooked the stretcher up backwards so the rider was riding upside down. We gave the word to the pilot and the CH-46 took off straight up. We never saw that looey again so I could not ask him what the ride was like. I hoped it scared the sh-t out of him. Last we heard he was pushing paper at division.

Sgt Robert Hougher


Dad Was A Grunt

Shopping at BJs in Tilton, NH recently. Guy at Verizon concession in the store - maybe mid-forties - had an EGA polo shirt on so of course I give him a big Semper Fi. No response from the maggot. Maggie's Drawers pop up in my head... let's see who this puke really is. I start talking to him about the Corps and he tells me he was with the 2nd Force Recon. Great outfit I replied. He goes on to tell me he was based in Texas. Really? 2nd Force Recon in Texas? Asked him where and he tells me: "They wouldn't tell us the name of the base due to our upcoming classified mission in Bolivia." Bolivia? By this time I'm just seething. Asked him about his MOS. Said he had two but they were also classified.

That did it. I went off on this puke and proceeded to tell him what I thought of him and his cr-p. Attracted quite a bit of attention. Customer Service manager comes up and asks me to tone it down and wants to know the issue so I lay it out in no uncertain terms. Turns out there's not much she can do because the Verizon folks work for Verizon and not the store. I get the Verizon managers name and number and chat up the dear fellow. Nice guy, tells me his dad was a Grunt in Nam and he completely understood; said he take care of it.

Funny thing. I can't find that lowlife jackazs at the store anymore. Imagine that.

Gerry Zanzalari
Corporal of Marines
220XXXX
1966 - 1970
RVN 1968 - 1969


Posers

man posing as a Marine

This is an image that was created sometime back for the Sgt Grit Facebook page. The image is of an actual poser with the added text "I don't always pretend to be a Marines... But when I do, I make it so obvious that I am a poser that every Marine wants to kick my a**".

Check out the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


God Loves Marines

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Someone asked me one time; "Dave, what is all this OoRah! stuff and fist bumps etc..." I replied and later posted those thoughts on my FB page... I thought you'd be interested in what I said... I believe it with all that is in me.

I wrote: "Truthfully... something happens to us. We find a oneness in purpose and a union of brotherhood in that we are never... never alone and everything done, is a life and death experience, whether or not it is at the moment. It may be or happen, when you least expect it. This serious commitment to a force, larger than the one, is something that never leaves us and we find a truth of the family of Marines in our simple motto; "Semper Fidelis"... ALWAYS Faithful, to our God, Country and Corps, in that order... then comes mom, apple pie and Chevrolet;... it is a way of life. I never expected I would see a need for that, until this decade... and it is simply there... and with all we have (even at my age) I know we will be there to face it. God loves Marines because we are steady, true and faithful to those precepts."

Semper Fi,
Dave Selvy
old Marine (NEVER ex.)


Well-Oiled Green Amphibious Machine

In the 18 Sept 14 edition, Sgt Grit mentions the Navy boot camp located near MCRD San Diego during the 1960's... Yes, it did exist, located about a half mile due west of MCRD. It was visible - when we weren't running or doing push-ups, which was rare - from the road near the old obstacle course at the 'back' of MCRD by the bay. The facility, opened in 1923 and closed around 1993, was the West Coast Naval Training Center [NTC].

During September-December 1961, I was in Platoon 371. At some late point in training, a number of recruit platoons were directed to attend a football game somewhere in San Diego (the fine details are today a blur, as were most boot camp events, so I take literary license for this sea story) and we sat in bleachers opposite a mob of Navy recruits. Of course, the heckling of the swabbies was incessant. That was more fun than any mere football game.

After the game ended, the sailors were being marched off to cattle-cars and crossed the playing field. 'Marched' is too strong a word, as their arms were swinging wildly, they were out of step and, bluntly put, "made Hogan's goat look like a precision instrument" (an oft-cited description used by my Jr DI, Sgt Perry.) The Marine recruits (privates or maggots, you choose) let out a massive roar of scorn certainly heard all the way to Oceanside...

When we marched off, we were 'six to the front, three to the rear', a full 30-inch step, and moved like a well-oiled green amphibious machine, hitting every pivot-point with precision. Upon returning 'home' to our Quonset huts, we received the only praise we'd hear from our Senior DI, SSGT AB Polk, until graduation as Honor Platoon on 7 December 61: "You people made me proud today; you might even make a pimple on a real Marine's arz someday."


First Ever Reunion

mice partaking of alcoholic beverages

This image was created for the Sgt Grit Facebook page. It features some mice partaking of some adult beverages with the added text "Scuttlebutt Breaking News... The 1st Ever Marine Corps House Mouse Reunion... It'll Never Happen".

Check out the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Saturday Morning Over Iwo Jima

Bill Knowles, Green Valley News & Sun and The Sahuarita Sun.

Off and on during my adult years I have associated with members of the United States Marine Corps and these short interludes have been worthwhile in all respects; most recently I have shared a mutual volunteer chore with a retired member of the Marines, a local guy by the name of Master Gunny Bob Duerden. Another great member of the "Corps."

For Bob and the rest of our local retired Marines, here is a story about 165 Marines on their way to war!

During the years 1963 to 1971, I had the privilege of managing the flight operation of a 13-plane fleet of Boeing 320C aircraft carrying troops and/or cargo from United States shores to SE Asia and the war known as Vietnam. When carrying Marines, our flights progressed from the USMC base at Pendleton, in Southern California, to Honolulu thence to the Marine base in Okinawa and then to Da Nang in Vietnam, where the Marines would board their own helicopters to proceed to their in-country posts.

It was a typical lovely Sunday that we departed Honolulu bound for Okinawa; there were three cockpit crew members, eight cabin flight attendants and 165 members of the USMC in this gold-tailed Boeing 320C Intercontinental jet capable of flying nonstop some 13 hours and more than 6,000 miles.

Over the Pacific Ocean the skies were clear and the ride was smooth... most of our passengers quickly fell asleep. Some seven hours later, a smidgen of light coming up on our tail suggested the arrival of the morning sunrise; I called the first flight attendant to the cockpit and asked about the well-being of the passengers and when she was planning to awaken them for their breakfast.

"We have a small gift for the Marines coming up in 20 minutes but I need them all to be awake."

She answered that she would awaken them now and serve breakfast when I advised her.

During flight planning, before departure from Honolulu, the en route winds and weather suggested a route that took us directly over the islands of Iwo Jima — these islands were deeply etched in the history of the USMC in World War II — and forecast winds would result in a flight faster than the normal for this route.

I called the first flight attendant on the intercom and advised her that I would be making a PA to the passengers in about 10 minutes and that after that please do not serve any beverages until we had passed Iwo Jima. A short time later our weather radar picked up the Iwo Jima Islands on the nose 40 miles ahead; I made the following PA to the passengers: "Gentlemen, I hope that you have been comfortable... we are ahead of schedule and we have a small gift for you this morning... in about 12 minutes we will pass directly over the islands of Iwo Jima where earlier members of your Marines fought so gallantly in World War II. We will circle the islands two ways so that all of you will have a great view of the islands.

The Pacific Ocean six miles below was glassy smooth and deep blue, it was an outstanding morning.

As we started our circle of the islands below, the first flight attendant came into the cockpit saying, "Captain, look back through the cockpit door at the passengers." She opened wide the cockpit door.

The First Sergeant had every Marine aboard standing up, at attention and these 165 proud warriors were singing the Marines' Hymn as we passed over these Iwo Jima Islands where so many of their brothers had earlier fallen.

The cabin of the aircraft had taken on all those qualities of a land-based church; I really do not think that, including the cockpit, there wasn't a dry eye aboard this flight, on this morning, so far from home. The hymn from 165 Marine voices reached every nook and cranny of this largest of Boeing aircraft on this peaceful morning... never to be forgotten.

Later arriving at Okinawa, where the Marines would spend a week or so before heading for Da Nang to join their fellow Marines, as our crew descended the steps after the passengers had proceeded us, we heard a great "Thank you, crew" from 165 proud Marines. It was a gratifying moment!

Of 157 flights across the Pacific, that particular trip — with 165 of the nation's finest – will live forever in the memory of this flight crew member.


Nothing More

Sgt. Grit,

I would like to respond to the Marine who signed himself as "A Former Hat, GySgt, USMC, (Ret)" (No name).

In the September 10 issue of Sgt. Grit, I had written asking two questions; (1) Why was the sea-going dip in our barracks cover phased out? (2) Why did they change from the split streamer to a single streamer on today's EGA? That's it. Nothing more.

By your leave, Gunny, but I am fully aware that the many changes and revisions in the Corps are for reasons of safety, security, modernization, cost, uniformity, discipline, ease of care and so on. I'm also aware Marines used swords, muskets, Trapdoor Springfield's and muzzle-loading, smooth-bore cannons. I am aware too, that our uniform once consisted of a British Tri-corn, a French kepi, and the British steel "doughboy" helmet. As much as I am partial to the old M-1 Garand, the M-14 or even the '03 Springfield, it would be foolhardy to send Marines into modern warfare with those antiquated weapons. I wouldn't even suggest it as I am now long past my warrior days. So are you. Nor was I seeking a gung-ho, tightening-up lecture, Gunny, I was simply asking if anyone knew why they changed those two things? I am also fully aware that Marines are Marines, no matter what they wear. I was neither condemning nor criticizing the Corps but had just two questions: (1) Why did they phase out the sea-going dip in our barracks cover? (2) Why did they change from the split streamer to a single streamer on today's EGA?

Nothing more.

Semper Fi,
J. Wise
204XXXX


Popular Song

I went through boot camp in 1961 like L/Cpl Edwin O'Keefe who wrote about SWAK and at that time it must have been one of the in acronyms written on the outside of the envelope. I think it was adapted from the line of a song popular at the time with we young set.

The one I remember was as read by the DI "delibber de letter de sooner de better".

The outside envelope addendums happened in early stages because as someone said, you quickly got the word out to the home front... don't put sh-t on the outside of the envelope!

More memorable were the couple of unfortunates who got packages... e.g. cookies or peanuts...

Before I left for PI, I gave everyone instructions... Do Not Send Me Stuff!

I think I got some good advice from a Marine to do so. And was I glad that everyone took my request to heart.

Cpl Don Harkness
1961-1965


Decorated Camo

A Marine with the 3rd Marine Regiment in Vietnam that had decorated both his helmet and flack jacket.

Photo by GySgt Gus Apsitis
Courtesy of the National Archives

Marine in Vietnam with written messages on his helmet and flak jacket


You're a Sadist

Sgt. Grit,

In the 16 Sept. News Letter was a bit about Gene Stoner and the "Black Rifle". As I was the Chief Armorer for the M16 Project at Camp Lejeune I was in contact with Gene Stoner several times. I asked for a "Mad Minute" which is used in testing all types of Machine Guns. They gave me the "Mad Minute", Gene Stoner was there when I did it.

During the Mad Minute I had the loaded magazines in a bucket of Water, pulling the magazines out of the water and firing the mag empty, inserting another mag and keep going until the minute is up. The first minute lasted about 45 seconds as the AR15/M16 barrel was bulged so bad the front sight was leaning forward. So I started the next Mad Minute with a new rifle. Colt had authorized it so getting what I wanted was no problem.

In trying to create the adverse problems we experienced in WWII, firing from a fox hole full of water and all that. I also asked to throw an M1 Garand, an M14 and an AR15/M16 in the surf, pull them out in a few minutes, open the action, dump the magazine out slosh the rifle around in the water to wash as much sand out of the Action as we could. We then loaded a fresh magazine and fired the rifles, the M1 fired and had to have the bolt kicked shut and fired again and again, it worked and continued to work. Same with the M14 and the AR15/M16 was fired but once as the sand jammed into the aircraft aluminum frame by the bolt and the rifle had to be taken apart to clear it.

Now some people might think all this was unnecessary but many landings in the Pacific and in Europe the rifles got dropped into the water and had to be scooped up out of the water, washed out as best you could to fire the rifle and continue the Mission. Gene Stoner thought it was a bit over the hill and called me (in a jest way) "You're a Sadist".

Now I understand it was his baby but we should have been testing the 7.62 mode also, I was proven right in my rough treatment as we went to Vietnam a short time later and the rough treatment did nothing to prevent the rifle from being adopted. The Air Force had adopted it a year before and with the Army and Marine Corps testing it, MacNamara, secretary of Defense said there will be only one weapons system in the United States Defense Department (Vietnam Vets, remember the MacNamara line in Vietnam?). So here we are today with modifications up the ying yang now it's called an M4 and does its job, as I hear no complaints.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC


Greatest Writer Of All Time

As a Marine MSgt, I agree with the sentiment and inspiration of your quote at the end of the 9/17/2014 newsletter with the Fallujah graphics; however, as an English Major, it is unconscionable to omit attribution of one of the most memorable (and inspiring) quotes from one who was arguably the greatest writer of all time, while giving attribution to all your other quotes.

Wm. Shakespeare - The Lives of Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3

- King Henry V -

"What's he that wishes so?
My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin:
If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
It yearns me not if men my garments wear; Such outward things dwell not in my desires:
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.
No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:
God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour As one man more, methinks, would share from me For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host, That he which hath no stomach to this fight, Let him depart; his passport shall be made And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
We would not die in that man's company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named, And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours, And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter, Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester, Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remember'd; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day."

At the risk of sounding condescending (might have happened, once or twice in my life), it seems condescending to paraphrase the above passage (even to put on a t-shirt). Without attribution, it is taking credit for someone else's work (Wow, when has that ever happened in the history of the Marine Corps?)

Also, you are giving short shrift to parts of this piece that should resonate with fellow Marines.

"If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.

If it works, there's too many to share the honor, and, if it fails, not enough to blame. Further:

For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition:

We have all served with Marines whose antecedents may be questionable, but stress and success may bring out the best in all of us.

As they say at the poker table, if you can't tell who the donkey is, it is probably you.

Sorry for the pedantic tone, but we are Marines, and while we may requisition words of inspiration, we should always acknowledge their provenance.

Semper Fi,
George M. Button
MSgt USMC (ret)


Marine Corps Facts

A MARINE and Superman once fought each other on a bet. The loser had to start wearing his underwear on the outside of his pants.

Most MARINES have a grizzly bear carpet in their room. The bear isn't dead; it's just afraid to move.

The MARINES have already been to Mars; that's why there are no signs of life.

Ghosts sit around the campfire and tell MARINE CORPS stories.

A MARINE can cut through a hot knife with butter.

Death once had a near-MARINE experience.

The MARINES are the reason why Waldo is hiding.

A MARINE can slam a revolving door.

When the Boogeyman goes to sleep every night, he checks his closet for US MARINES.

A MARINE once kicked a horse in the chin. Its descendants are known today as Giraffes.

A MARINE once got bit by a rattle snake... After three days of pain and agony... the rattle snake died.

When A MARINE does a pushup, he isn't lifting himself up, he's pushing the Earth down.

When a MARINE throws you into a bottomless pit, you hit the bottom.

A MARINE does not sleep. He waits.

A MARINE once made a Happy Meal cry.

You NEVER slap a MARINE.

A MARINE called 911 to order Chinese food and got it...

Guns are warned not to play with the MARINES.

A MARINE can give aspirin a headache.


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(VOL #10, #2)

I returned to the hotel, got out of the hot Dress Blues and put on a pair of swim trunks to go out to the pool. I swam around for a while and went in to change into something I could wear into the dining room. I went down for something light; had a great turkey club sandwich and an iced tea. I returned to my room, showered and turned in for the night. I planned to leave for home when I arose in the morning. I slept like a log until 0500. I took another shower, got dressed and checked out before 0600. I was on my way home - 600 miles away. I drove a little faster than I did on my way west to Richmond. I planned to make it home by 1800. My first stop, for breakfast, was at the same place Mary and I had stopped the previous Thursday morning. It was quite good. I was back on the road. After I passed Columbus I pulled into a gas station to fill the tank. This would get me to the Midway on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I don't think the car came to a complete stop until I reached that point. It was just after 1300 when I pulled into the Midway. I filled the tank, checked everything else and went into the restaurant for my last meal before I would be home. I started out on the final leg of this trip just before 1400. I had just four hours to cover about 225 miles. I was on schedule.

I arrived at Mary's house where I had been staying while my Mom & Dad were on their extended vacation around the United States at 1755... just 5 minutes ahead of schedule. The 'B's were happy to see me. They had just finished dinner and asked if I was hungry. I was really starving but said "No, I'll pass this time." They wanted to hear all about my trip - and Mary's entrance into Earlham. I told them everything; where we stopped Wednesday evening; about Mary turning the check in at the Admissions Office; and where we stayed Thursday and Friday night. I told them about taking Mary to The Hollyhock Hill restaurant in Indianapolis. Mrs.'B' said "That must be a very special place - to drive 75 miles each way for dinner." Mr.'B' said "They must serve some d-mned good food. I would never drive that far to eat. I'd starve to death first." When I told them about my Sunday surprise for Mary they thought that was great. Mr.'B' said "If we had taken her to the college we would have left on Friday, dumped her off on Saturday and returned home on Sunday." Mrs.'B' said "There you go again - saying stupid things. You know quite well that it would not have been that way." He started laughing his head off again. Then he said "Well Harold, I have some good news for you. Do you by any chance remember picking up the newspaper when we were leaving for the beach?" I said "Yes." He asked "Did you by any chance read any of it?" I said "I glanced at the front page." He asked "Do you remember any of what you read?" I thought about this for a moment and said "Yes, I vaguely remember it said something about The Hemlocks being sold." He said "That's it! One of the girls in my firm had written a contract on that property. And while we were in O.C. it was finalized. The sellers then bought a home in Moorestown - through our firm - and moved into their new home while we were still in O.C.

I am sure you are wondering what this all means to you. Well, I'll tell you. It was an all cash transaction and it was your parents that purchased 'The Hemlocks'. They moved in while you were on your trip to Richmond. What do you think of that?" I was speechless. There had been much in the press about that property during the process to build the New Jersey Turnpike - which had cut straight thru that property - cutting it into 2 separate parcels.

Semper Fi... The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Clever NVA Devils

Marines During Operation Hastings

Those of us of certain ages, and who were mostly, somewhat, or just occasionally 'in the rear with the gear and the beer and the Generals in Viet Nam' may recall, along with the Stars and Stripes, and Navy Times, a freebie 'newspaper' entitled 'The Sea Tiger'... didn't think about it at the time, but the 'Sea' may have been some PAO's cutesy idea for 'South East Asia'. (Marine Corps Times, as a separate entity, didn't come along until later... I'm guessing in the 1980's or later...) This publication was of the same size and format as the others, and covered mostly items for and about IIIMAF (Third Marine Amphibious Force). In any field of endeavor, there are those who 'know'... and those who THINK they know... To the point, in July of '66, we (K/3/5) along with a whole bunch of other units, were involved in Operation Hastings. History buffs will recognize the tie to the (English) Battle of Hastings... some 900 years earlier... and either from unintentional irony, or cleverness on some G-3's part, the name was chosen... maybe because the Commanding General of the forces involved was General English...

We had come ashore earlier in Operation Deckhouse II, being from the SLF (Special Landing Force), and segued (great word, that... learned from watching Johnny Carson) into Hastings. A day or so in, without much contact, we were moving through tertiary (3-layer) jungle, and came upon some NVA gear... initially, just some 'chogie poles' and some spun aluminum cooking pans. The word was passed back, and instructions to move on through, then hold up came back up from the CP group, as the Skipper wanted to exam this find. One of the curiouser items in this collection were the hand-made separators between the various size pans, which were made to 'nest' inside the others, and the whole stack enclosed by some lashing... one stack to each end of the chogie pole. These separators were about 3 inches in diameter, woven of rattan in a circle, with what looked like two popsicle sticks in a cross arrangement inside the circle. The way everything fit, it was pretty obvious that this was some ol' country boy's version of an anti-rattle device to keep those pots and pans quiet when on the move. (A bit latter, one of the 1st Platoon's flankers found what turned out to be an entire NVA 320B Division battalion's cache of haversacks... another story for another time on the contents thereof)... which brings us back to the Sea Tiger later on... prominent on the front page was a picture of a Marine with a captured AK-47... holding one of those ring with a cross inside pot separators over the barrel... and the blurb said those clever NVA devils had devised a simple sight device for anti-aircraft fire!... Could be, but I'd think in the middle of the Bn mess kit would be an odd place to tote one's anti-aircraft sights... will admit, the gizmo had some slight similarity to the ring sights on the AA guns on ships, but actually using it by holding it while firing from the shoulder was a bit of a stretch...

The picture was originally shot in B/W with a 'half-frame' camera, which used 35MM film, but took two pictures per frame. The camera looked to be stainless steel, and was small enough to fit in a utlity blouse pocket. It belonged to (then) 2nd Lt Robert Rosenau (on the right of the tree), and the picture was taken during Operation Hastings. One of the Marines in the background I can identify only as 'Ben', and I think he was of Cuban extraction. Rosie and I are using my pocket saw, which was a gnarly sharp piece of wire with teeth on it, and a ring on each end (much like a grenade ring). It could be coiled up and carried quite handily. We are cutting timbers to make a roof over our hole... having gotten into sort of a contest in the platoon to see who could come up with the most elaborate position. The round boonie covers in the picture until a few days earlier, had belonged to some North Vietnamesse Army grunts...

Ddick


Taps

Ott, Charles

Charles Robert Ott was born to Marinus Ott and Edna White on Feb. 15, 1924 in Paterson, N.J. At the age of 4, Charles, his sister Dorthy, brother Daniel and his mother went to live with his grandparents, Daniel and Katie White. Charles lived in his grandparents' home until he graduated from Lodi High and enlisted in the Navy during World War II. Chuck became a fighting Seabee. He ran and maintained bulldozers, turnapoles and other heavy equipment when the equipment was controlled by steering brakes. Chuck was in the 121st Naval Construction Battalion. On May 10, 1943, it was re-designated 3rd Battalion, 20th Regiment, 4th Marine Division. In invasions, Chuck was part of an eight-man BAR Squad that consisted of four gunners who carried and used this heavy gun; and four ammunition carriers that carried two bandoliers. Gunners only carried one. Assigned to the Pacific, Chuck participated in invasions in the Marshall Islands. After securing Roi and Namur, Japanese bombers returned -- and almost all supplies were lost. Chuck lost 30 pounds eating Japanese rice. Large men lost as much as 60 pounds before new supplies arrived.

In the Saipan, Chuck's ammunition carrier took a direct hit from a mortar and was killed. Chuck was wounded. After being rescued by an Army tank crew, Chuck spent three months in a hospital in Honolulu. He asked to be reassigned to his unit and was sent to Tinian. When he got there, he found that his unit had been shipped home. However, while he was on Tinian, he saw a strange-looking B-52, i.e. Enola Gay, take off. The war was over. The Navy offered him the rank of chief to re-enlist. But being lonely and weary of war, Chuck returned to the United States and his grandparents' home. Along with an honorable discharge from the Navy, Chuck was awarded: Asiatic Pacific Theatre Ribbon Two Stars, Presidential Citation One Star, Purple Heart, Letter of Commendation, Victory Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, American Theatre.

Rest In Peace!


Short Rounds

Five of the eight men to be awarded two Medals of Honor are U.S. Marines.

They are:

Smedley D. Butler
Daniel J. Daily
Louis Cukela
Joseph King
John H. Pruitt


I found the story about LtGen. Cheatham to be disrespectful! Since when do you refer to an officer by his first name. Whether his decision right or wrong is in no way for a "Marine" to be disrespectful.

As I am sure Mr. Wear is aware, during intense combat, not all decisions are made correctly or to the satisfaction of everyone concerned.

Joe Henderson
Sgt. USMC.
1963-1967


Quotes

Marcus Aurelius Quote

"Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one."
--Marcus Aurelius


"We can and must write in a language which sows among the masses hate, revulsion, and scorn toward those who disagree with us."
--Vladimir Lenin


"As a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights. Where an excess of power prevails, property of no sort is duly respected. No man is safe in his opinions, his person, his faculties, or his possessions."
--James Madison, 1792


"The deadliest weapon in the world is a MARINE and his rifle!"
--Gen. John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing, US Army


"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
--George Orwell


"The day the soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership."
--Colin Powell


"Flip flop, hippity hop, mob stop!"

"You people are a herd, I would call you a mob, but a mob has a leader."

"Road guards out!"

"House mouse to the duty hut!"

God Bless the American Dream!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 02 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Phantoms Forever
• Dangerously Gung Ho Lieutenant
• Dad Was A Grunt

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Sgt. Grit,

On March 5, 1964, I became One of The Few, One of The Proud, A United States Marine. 50 years later, and with a little help from Sgt. Grit, I would like to Present My Great-Grandson 1st Class Elijah James Yezzo... Semper Fi! Gung Ho...

Robert Sabolchick

Get this awesome set at:

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set


Smiling As I Write

Wake Up Call For The Swabs: This is regarding the submission from Sgt. Grit about the Navy boot camp being next to MCRD in the '60s. Ddick was talking about "triggers" and this was really one for me.

One morning toward the end of 1960 at about 0'dark-thirty we were marched to the fence at the end of the run way separating MCRD from the Navy boot camp and ordered to sing at the top of lungs our most revered hymn. The Swabs were all still nestled in their racks and as we sang the lights started to come on and they began shouting. Our bandy rooster junior DI was marching back and forth in front of the platoon pumping his arm (Full Metal Jacket) and singing along with us his favorite song. The Swabs were totally p-ssed but we were exhilarated for the rest of the day! I'm smiling as I write this!

Cpl. Selders
MCRD '60


Phantoms Forever

I was an ordnanceman on the F4 in 1975. The F-4's that were stationed at MCAS El Toro, CA were F-4 N's and RF-4 B's. None of which were in camouflage. All of them were a shiny gray color with colorful squadron logo's and call letters displayed on their tails. I transferred to Beaufort, SC in 1977 where the F-4 squadrons all flew F-4 J models. Those F-4's were all painted the same way. In 1978, right after the movie "The Great Santini" aka "The Ace" starring Robert Duvall was recorded in Beaufort, I joined the Checkerboards, VMFA-312, the squadron portrait in the movie. We did a West-Pac tour in 1979 and we either started to swap out our F-4 J's to F-4 Super J's after that West-Pac or the following one. The F-4 Super J's and then soon after, F-4 S's were painted a flat gray/blue camouflage. This was the first of my knowledge that the F-4 Phantom was painted in a camouflage scheme and stayed that way until they were retired.

I was fortunate to go on to Yuma, AZ assigned to VMFAT-101 and continue with the F-4's after an instructor assignment at NAS Memphis, TN. While in Yuma, we started to send the F-4's to mothballs prior to the Squadron moving to MCAS El Toro and transition to F-18's. I then transferred to an A-4 squadron VMA-211 to do another West-Pac and assist in the squadron transfer from MCAS El Toro to MCAS Yuma via the West-Pac tour. Soon after we returned from West-Pac, I was reassigned to MWWU-3 for 42 months before I received orders to the last Marine F-4 squadron. In 1991, I was assigned to VMFA-112, known as the Dallas Cowboys at NAS Dallas, TX. It was great to be back with Phantom again.

Unfortunately, the F-4 Phantom was retired from the Marine Corps a year and a half before I was. The F-4 Phantom retired from the Marine Corps in 1993 at NAS Dallas, TX. In 1995, I followed close behind. A lot of my blood and sweat were left on many a F-4 and it was an honor to serve as many years as I did with all of them, but most of all, all of my Marine brothers and sisters that I was also honored to have worked with. IYAOYAS!

Daemon R, "Doc" Butts
GySgt USMC Ret.
1975-1995
VMFA-531, VMFP-3, VMFA-451, VMFA-312, VMFAT-101, VMA-211 and VMFA-112


Dangerouly Gung Ho Lieutenant

I was in my 12th month in Nam, dreaming of that freedom bird. 1970 and Charlie 1/5 was working in the Khe Son mountains. We had been out humping the boonies for about 3/4 days and a chopper drops off the new 1st platoon lieutenant.

He was green as grass and dangerously gung ho. As the platoon sergeant it was up to me to try and educate this guy before he got a bunch of us wounded or worse.

We were scheduled for a patrol through an area that the day before gave up a cache of Chicom weapons, rockets, grenades and a few American M-60s. I would love to know how those guns wound up in that cave. Anyway, we were all a little on edge anyway and now we have to deal with "John Wayne" as our new looey.

We spent the morning snooping and pooping going up and down well used trails. Everyone is on high alert. The point man finds a booby trapped grenade. The new lieutenant grabs the grenade and winds up like Bob Gibson ready to throw a fast ball. I screamed at him to stop. He did. I then tried to explain to him that the VC will take the delay out of a booby trapped grenade so the detonation is almost immediate. He is adamant that he is going to toss that grenade. WTF. I backed the rest of the platoon away from any kill zone. The man tosses out the grenade and it immediately blows tearing a hole in his arm. He lucked out. He should have been killed.

Now for the good part of the story. We called in a medevac. The ground was too steep for the bird to land. The crew chief tossed out a stretcher that was designed to winch into the chopper. We had never seen one of these. It took a while, but we finally got the lieutenant secured into the stretcher. Just as my radio man brought over the ring to secure the stretcher to the chopper, we looked at each other, smiled, and hooked the stretcher up backwards so the rider was riding upside down. We gave the word to the pilot and the CH-46 took off straight up. We never saw that looey again so I could not ask him what the ride was like. I hoped it scared the sh-t out of him. Last we heard he was pushing paper at division.

Sgt Robert Hougher


Dad Was A Grunt

Shopping at BJs in Tilton, NH recently. Guy at Verizon concession in the store - maybe mid-forties - had an EGA polo shirt on so of course I give him a big Semper Fi. No response from the maggot. Maggie's Drawers pop up in my head... let's see who this puke really is. I start talking to him about the Corps and he tells me he was with the 2nd Force Recon. Great outfit I replied. He goes on to tell me he was based in Texas. Really? 2nd Force Recon in Texas? Asked him where and he tells me: "They wouldn't tell us the name of the base due to our upcoming classified mission in Bolivia." Bolivia? By this time I'm just seething. Asked him about his MOS. Said he had two but they were also classified.

That did it. I went off on this puke and proceeded to tell him what I thought of him and his cr-p. Attracted quite a bit of attention. Customer Service manager comes up and asks me to tone it down and wants to know the issue so I lay it out in no uncertain terms. Turns out there's not much she can do because the Verizon folks work for Verizon and not the store. I get the Verizon managers name and number and chat up the dear fellow. Nice guy, tells me his dad was a Grunt in Nam and he completely understood; said he take care of it.

Funny thing. I can't find that lowlife jackazs at the store anymore. Imagine that.

Gerry Zanzalari
Corporal of Marines
220XXXX
1966 - 1970
RVN 1968 - 1969


God Loves Marines

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Someone asked me one time; "Dave, what is all this OoRah! stuff and fist bumps etc..." I replied and later posted those thoughts on my FB page... I thought you'd be interested in what I said... I believe it with all that is in me.

I wrote: "Truthfully... something happens to us. We find a oneness in purpose and a union of brotherhood in that we are never... never alone and everything done, is a life and death experience, whether or not it is at the moment. It may be or happen, when you least expect it. This serious commitment to a force, larger than the one, is something that never leaves us and we find a truth of the family of Marines in our simple motto; "Semper Fidelis"... ALWAYS Faithful, to our God, Country and Corps, in that order... then comes mom, apple pie and Chevrolet;... it is a way of life. I never expected I would see a need for that, until this decade... and it is simply there... and with all we have (even at my age) I know we will be there to face it. God loves Marines because we are steady, true and faithful to those precepts."

Semper Fi,
Dave Selvy
old Marine (NEVER ex.)


Well-Oiled Green Amphibious Machine

In the 18 Sept 14 edition, Sgt Grit mentions the Navy boot camp located near MCRD San Diego during the 1960's... Yes, it did exist, located about a half mile due west of MCRD. It was visible - when we weren't running or doing push-ups, which was rare - from the road near the old obstacle course at the 'back' of MCRD by the bay. The facility, opened in 1923 and closed around 1993, was the West Coast Naval Training Center [NTC].

During September-December 1961, I was in Platoon 371. At some late point in training, a number of recruit platoons were directed to attend a football game somewhere in San Diego (the fine details are today a blur, as were most boot camp events, so I take literary license for this sea story) and we sat in bleachers opposite a mob of Navy recruits. Of course, the heckling of the swabbies was incessant. That was more fun than any mere football game.

After the game ended, the sailors were being marched off to cattle-cars and crossed the playing field. 'Marched' is too strong a word, as their arms were swinging wildly, they were out of step and, bluntly put, "made Hogan's goat look like a precision instrument" (an oft-cited description used by my Jr DI, Sgt Perry.) The Marine recruits (privates or maggots, you choose) let out a massive roar of scorn certainly heard all the way to Oceanside...

When we marched off, we were 'six to the front, three to the rear', a full 30-inch step, and moved like a well-oiled green amphibious machine, hitting every pivot-point with precision. Upon returning 'home' to our Quonset huts, we received the only praise we'd hear from our Senior DI, SSGT AB Polk, until graduation as Honor Platoon on 7 December 61: "You people made me proud today; you might even make a pimple on a real Marine's arz someday."


Saturday Morning Over Iwo Jima

Bill Knowles, Green Valley News & Sun and The Sahuarita Sun.

Off and on during my adult years I have associated with members of the United States Marine Corps and these short interludes have been worthwhile in all respects; most recently I have shared a mutual volunteer chore with a retired member of the Marines, a local guy by the name of Master Gunny Bob Duerden. Another great member of the "Corps."

For Bob and the rest of our local retired Marines, here is a story about 165 Marines on their way to war!

During the years 1963 to 1971, I had the privilege of managing the flight operation of a 13-plane fleet of Boeing 320C aircraft carrying troops and/or cargo from United States shores to SE Asia and the war known as Vietnam. When carrying Marines, our flights progressed from the USMC base at Pendleton, in Southern California, to Honolulu thence to the Marine base in Okinawa and then to Da Nang in Vietnam, where the Marines would board their own helicopters to proceed to their in-country posts.

It was a typical lovely Sunday that we departed Honolulu bound for Okinawa; there were three cockpit crew members, eight cabin flight attendants and 165 members of the USMC in this gold-tailed Boeing 320C Intercontinental jet capable of flying nonstop some 13 hours and more than 6,000 miles.

Over the Pacific Ocean the skies were clear and the ride was smooth... most of our passengers quickly fell asleep. Some seven hours later, a smidgen of light coming up on our tail suggested the arrival of the morning sunrise; I called the first flight attendant to the cockpit and asked about the well-being of the passengers and when she was planning to awaken them for their breakfast.

"We have a small gift for the Marines coming up in 20 minutes but I need them all to be awake."

She answered that she would awaken them now and serve breakfast when I advised her.

During flight planning, before departure from Honolulu, the en route winds and weather suggested a route that took us directly over the islands of Iwo Jima — these islands were deeply etched in the history of the USMC in World War II — and forecast winds would result in a flight faster than the normal for this route.

I called the first flight attendant on the intercom and advised her that I would be making a PA to the passengers in about 10 minutes and that after that please do not serve any beverages until we had passed Iwo Jima. A short time later our weather radar picked up the Iwo Jima Islands on the nose 40 miles ahead; I made the following PA to the passengers: "Gentlemen, I hope that you have been comfortable... we are ahead of schedule and we have a small gift for you this morning... in about 12 minutes we will pass directly over the islands of Iwo Jima where earlier members of your Marines fought so gallantly in World War II. We will circle the islands two ways so that all of you will have a great view of the islands.

The Pacific Ocean six miles below was glassy smooth and deep blue, it was an outstanding morning.

As we started our circle of the islands below, the first flight attendant came into the cockpit saying, "Captain, look back through the cockpit door at the passengers." She opened wide the cockpit door.

The First Sergeant had every Marine aboard standing up, at attention and these 165 proud warriors were singing the Marines' Hymn as we passed over these Iwo Jima Islands where so many of their brothers had earlier fallen.

The cabin of the aircraft had taken on all those qualities of a land-based church; I really do not think that, including the cockpit, there wasn't a dry eye aboard this flight, on this morning, so far from home. The hymn from 165 Marine voices reached every nook and cranny of this largest of Boeing aircraft on this peaceful morning... never to be forgotten.

Later arriving at Okinawa, where the Marines would spend a week or so before heading for Da Nang to join their fellow Marines, as our crew descended the steps after the passengers had proceeded us, we heard a great "Thank you, crew" from 165 proud Marines. It was a gratifying moment!

Of 157 flights across the Pacific, that particular trip — with 165 of the nation's finest – will live forever in the memory of this flight crew member.


Nothing More

Sgt. Grit,

I would like to respond to the Marine who signed himself as "A Former Hat, GySgt, USMC, (Ret)" (No name).

In the September 10 issue of Sgt. Grit, I had written asking two questions; (1) Why was the sea-going dip in our barracks cover phased out? (2) Why did they change from the split streamer to a single streamer on today's EGA? That's it. Nothing more.

By your leave, Gunny, but I am fully aware that the many changes and revisions in the Corps are for reasons of safety, security, modernization, cost, uniformity, discipline, ease of care and so on. I'm also aware Marines used swords, muskets, Trapdoor Springfield's and muzzle-loading, smooth-bore cannons. I am aware too, that our uniform once consisted of a British Tri-corn, a French kepi, and the British steel "doughboy" helmet. As much as I am partial to the old M-1 Garand, the M-14 or even the '03 Springfield, it would be foolhardy to send Marines into modern warfare with those antiquated weapons. I wouldn't even suggest it as I am now long past my warrior days. So are you. Nor was I seeking a gung-ho, tightening-up lecture, Gunny, I was simply asking if anyone knew why they changed those two things? I am also fully aware that Marines are Marines, no matter what they wear. I was neither condemning nor criticizing the Corps but had just two questions: (1) Why did they phase out the sea-going dip in our barracks cover? (2) Why did they change from the split streamer to a single streamer on today's EGA?

Nothing more.

Semper Fi,
J. Wise
204XXXX


Popular Song

I went through boot camp in 1961 like L/Cpl Edwin O'Keefe who wrote about SWAK and at that time it must have been one of the in acronyms written on the outside of the envelope. I think it was adapted from the line of a song popular at the time with we young set.

The one I remember was as read by the DI "delibber de letter de sooner de better".

The outside envelope addendums happened in early stages because as someone said, you quickly got the word out to the home front... don't put sh-t on the outside of the envelope!

More memorable were the couple of unfortunates who got packages... e.g. cookies or peanuts...

Before I left for PI, I gave everyone instructions... Do Not Send Me Stuff!

I think I got some good advice from a Marine to do so. And was I glad that everyone took my request to heart.

Cpl Don Harkness
1961-1965


Decorated Camo

A Marine with the 3rd Marine Regiment in Vietnam that had decorated both his helmet and flack jacket.

Photo by GySgt Gus Apsitis
Courtesy of the National Archives


You're a Sadist

Sgt. Grit,

In the 16 Sept. News Letter was a bit about Gene Stoner and the "Black Rifle". As I was the Chief Armorer for the M16 Project at Camp Lejeune I was in contact with Gene Stoner several times. I asked for a "Mad Minute" which is used in testing all types of Machine Guns. They gave me the "Mad Minute", Gene Stoner was there when I did it.

During the Mad Minute I had the loaded magazines in a bucket of Water, pulling the magazines out of the water and firing the mag empty, inserting another mag and keep going until the minute is up. The first minute lasted about 45 seconds as the AR15/M16 barrel was bulged so bad the front sight was leaning forward. So I started the next Mad Minute with a new rifle. Colt had authorized it so getting what I wanted was no problem.

In trying to create the adverse problems we experienced in WWII, firing from a fox hole full of water and all that. I also asked to throw an M1 Garand, an M14 and an AR15/M16 in the surf, pull them out in a few minutes, open the action, dump the magazine out slosh the rifle around in the water to wash as much sand out of the Action as we could. We then loaded a fresh magazine and fired the rifles, the M1 fired and had to have the bolt kicked shut and fired again and again, it worked and continued to work. Same with the M14 and the AR15/M16 was fired but once as the sand jammed into the aircraft aluminum frame by the bolt and the rifle had to be taken apart to clear it.

Now some people might think all this was unnecessary but many landings in the Pacific and in Europe the rifles got dropped into the water and had to be scooped up out of the water, washed out as best you could to fire the rifle and continue the Mission. Gene Stoner thought it was a bit over the hill and called me (in a jest way) "You're a Sadist".

Now I understand it was his baby but we should have been testing the 7.62 mode also, I was proven right in my rough treatment as we went to Vietnam a short time later and the rough treatment did nothing to prevent the rifle from being adopted. The Air Force had adopted it a year before and with the Army and Marine Corps testing it, MacNamara, secretary of Defense said there will be only one weapons system in the United States Defense Department (Vietnam Vets, remember the MacNamara line in Vietnam?). So here we are today with modifications up the ying yang now it's called an M4 and does its job, as I hear no complaints.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC


Greatest Writer Of All Time

As a Marine MSgt, I agree with the sentiment and inspiration of your quote at the end of the 9/17/2014 newsletter with the Fallujah graphics; however, as an English Major, it is unconscionable to omit attribution of one of the most memorable (and inspiring) quotes from one who was arguably the greatest writer of all time, while giving attribution to all your other quotes.

Wm. Shakespeare - The Lives of Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3

- King Henry V -

"What's he that wishes so?
My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin:
If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
It yearns me not if men my garments wear; Such outward things dwell not in my desires:
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.
No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:
God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour As one man more, methinks, would share from me For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host, That he which hath no stomach to this fight, Let him depart; his passport shall be made And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
We would not die in that man's company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named, And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours, And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter, Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester, Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remember'd; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day."

At the risk of sounding condescending (might have happened, once or twice in my life), it seems condescending to paraphrase the above passage (even to put on a t-shirt). Without attribution, it is taking credit for someone else's work (Wow, when has that ever happened in the history of the Marine Corps?)

Also, you are giving short shrift to parts of this piece that should resonate with fellow Marines.

"If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.

If it works, there's too many to share the honor, and, if it fails, not enough to blame. Further:

For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition:

We have all served with Marines whose antecedents may be questionable, but stress and success may bring out the best in all of us.

As they say at the poker table, if you can't tell who the donkey is, it is probably you.

Sorry for the pedantic tone, but we are Marines, and while we may requisition words of inspiration, we should always acknowledge their provenance.

Semper Fi,
George M. Button
MSgt USMC (ret)


Marine Corps Facts

A MARINE and Superman once fought each other on a bet. The loser had to start wearing his underwear on the outside of his pants.

Most MARINES have a grizzly bear carpet in their room. The bear isn't dead; it's just afraid to move.

The MARINES have already been to Mars; that's why there are no signs of life.

Ghosts sit around the campfire and tell MARINE CORPS stories.

A MARINE can cut through a hot knife with butter.

Death once had a near-MARINE experience.

The MARINES are the reason why Waldo is hiding.

A MARINE can slam a revolving door.

When the Boogeyman goes to sleep every night, he checks his closet for US MARINES.

A MARINE once kicked a horse in the chin. Its descendants are known today as Giraffes.

A MARINE once got bit by a rattle snake... After three days of pain and agony... the rattle snake died.

When A MARINE does a pushup, he isn't lifting himself up, he's pushing the Earth down.

When a MARINE throws you into a bottomless pit, you hit the bottom.

A MARINE does not sleep. He waits.

A MARINE once made a Happy Meal cry.

You NEVER slap a MARINE.

A MARINE called 911 to order Chinese food and got it...

Guns are warned not to play with the MARINES.

A MARINE can give aspirin a headache.


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(VOL #10, #2)

I returned to the hotel, got out of the hot Dress Blues and put on a pair of swim trunks to go out to the pool. I swam around for a while and went in to change into something I could wear into the dining room. I went down for something light; had a great turkey club sandwich and an iced tea. I returned to my room, showered and turned in for the night. I planned to leave for home when I arose in the morning. I slept like a log until 0500. I took another shower, got dressed and checked out before 0600. I was on my way home - 600 miles away. I drove a little faster than I did on my way west to Richmond. I planned to make it home by 1800. My first stop, for breakfast, was at the same place Mary and I had stopped the previous Thursday morning. It was quite good. I was back on the road. After I passed Columbus I pulled into a gas station to fill the tank. This would get me to the Midway on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I don't think the car came to a complete stop until I reached that point. It was just after 1300 when I pulled into the Midway. I filled the tank, checked everything else and went into the restaurant for my last meal before I would be home. I started out on the final leg of this trip just before 1400. I had just four hours to cover about 225 miles. I was on schedule.

I arrived at Mary's house where I had been staying while my Mom & Dad were on their extended vacation around the United States at 1755... just 5 minutes ahead of schedule. The 'B's were happy to see me. They had just finished dinner and asked if I was hungry. I was really starving but said "No, I'll pass this time." They wanted to hear all about my trip - and Mary's entrance into Earlham. I told them everything; where we stopped Wednesday evening; about Mary turning the check in at the Admissions Office; and where we stayed Thursday and Friday night. I told them about taking Mary to The Hollyhock Hill restaurant in Indianapolis. Mrs.'B' said "That must be a very special place - to drive 75 miles each way for dinner." Mr.'B' said "They must serve some d-mned good food. I would never drive that far to eat. I'd starve to death first." When I told them about my Sunday surprise for Mary they thought that was great. Mr.'B' said "If we had taken her to the college we would have left on Friday, dumped her off on Saturday and returned home on Sunday." Mrs.'B' said "There you go again - saying stupid things. You know quite well that it would not have been that way." He started laughing his head off again. Then he said "Well Harold, I have some good news for you. Do you by any chance remember picking up the newspaper when we were leaving for the beach?" I said "Yes." He asked "Did you by any chance read any of it?" I said "I glanced at the front page." He asked "Do you remember any of what you read?" I thought about this for a moment and said "Yes, I vaguely remember it said something about The Hemlocks being sold." He said "That's it! One of the girls in my firm had written a contract on that property. And while we were in O.C. it was finalized. The sellers then bought a home in Moorestown - through our firm - and moved into their new home while we were still in O.C.

I am sure you are wondering what this all means to you. Well, I'll tell you. It was an all cash transaction and it was your parents that purchased 'The Hemlocks'. They moved in while you were on your trip to Richmond. What do you think of that?" I was speechless. There had been much in the press about that property during the process to build the New Jersey Turnpike - which had cut straight thru that property - cutting it into 2 separate parcels.

Semper Fi... The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Clever NVA Devils

Those of us of certain ages, and who were mostly, somewhat, or just occasionally 'in the rear with the gear and the beer and the Generals in Viet Nam' may recall, along with the Stars and Stripes, and Navy Times, a freebie 'newspaper' entitled 'The Sea Tiger'... didn't think about it at the time, but the 'Sea' may have been some PAO's cutesy idea for 'South East Asia'. (Marine Corps Times, as a separate entity, didn't come along until later... I'm guessing in the 1980's or later...) This publication was of the same size and format as the others, and covered mostly items for and about IIIMAF (Third Marine Amphibious Force). In any field of endeavor, there are those who 'know'... and those who THINK they know... To the point, in July of '66, we (K/3/5) along with a whole bunch of other units, were involved in Operation Hastings. History buffs will recognize the tie to the (English) Battle of Hastings... some 900 years earlier... and either from unintentional irony, or cleverness on some G-3's part, the name was chosen... maybe because the Commanding General of the forces involved was General English...

We had come ashore earlier in Operation Deckhouse II, being from the SLF (Special Landing Force), and segued (great word, that... learned from watching Johnny Carson) into Hastings. A day or so in, without much contact, we were moving through tertiary (3-layer) jungle, and came upon some NVA gear... initially, just some 'chogie poles' and some spun aluminum cooking pans. The word was passed back, and instructions to move on through, then hold up came back up from the CP group, as the Skipper wanted to exam this find. One of the curiouser items in this collection were the hand-made separators between the various size pans, which were made to 'nest' inside the others, and the whole stack enclosed by some lashing... one stack to each end of the chogie pole. These separators were about 3 inches in diameter, woven of rattan in a circle, with what looked like two popsicle sticks in a cross arrangement inside the circle. The way everything fit, it was pretty obvious that this was some ol' country boy's version of an anti-rattle device to keep those pots and pans quiet when on the move. (A bit latter, one of the 1st Platoon's flankers found what turned out to be an entire NVA 320B Division battalion's cache of haversacks... another story for another time on the contents thereof)... which brings us back to the Sea Tiger later on... prominent on the front page was a picture of a Marine with a captured AK-47... holding one of those ring with a cross inside pot separators over the barrel... and the blurb said those clever NVA devils had devised a simple sight device for anti-aircraft fire!... Could be, but I'd think in the middle of the Bn mess kit would be an odd place to tote one's anti-aircraft sights... will admit, the gizmo had some slight similarity to the ring sights on the AA guns on ships, but actually using it by holding it while firing from the shoulder was a bit of a stretch...

The picture was originally shot in B/W with a 'half-frame' camera, which used 35MM film, but took two pictures per frame. The camera looked to be stainless steel, and was small enough to fit in a utlity blouse pocket. It belonged to (then) 2nd Lt Robert Rosenau (on the right of the tree), and the picture was taken during Operation Hastings. One of the Marines in the background I can identify only as 'Ben', and I think he was of Cuban extraction. Rosie and I are using my pocket saw, which was a gnarly sharp piece of wire with teeth on it, and a ring on each end (much like a grenade ring). It could be coiled up and carried quite handily. We are cutting timbers to make a roof over our hole... having gotten into sort of a contest in the platoon to see who could come up with the most elaborate position. The round boonie covers in the picture until a few days earlier, had belonged to some North Vietnamesse Army grunts...

Ddick


Taps

Ott, Charles

Charles Robert Ott was born to Marinus Ott and Edna White on Feb. 15, 1924 in Paterson, N.J. At the age of 4, Charles, his sister Dorthy, brother Daniel and his mother went to live with his grandparents, Daniel and Katie White. Charles lived in his grandparents' home until he graduated from Lodi High and enlisted in the Navy during World War II. Chuck became a fighting Seabee. He ran and maintained bulldozers, turnapoles and other heavy equipment when the equipment was controlled by steering brakes. Chuck was in the 121st Naval Construction Battalion. On May 10, 1943, it was re-designated 3rd Battalion, 20th Regiment, 4th Marine Division. In invasions, Chuck was part of an eight-man BAR Squad that consisted of four gunners who carried and used this heavy gun; and four ammunition carriers that carried two bandoliers. Gunners only carried one. Assigned to the Pacific, Chuck participated in invasions in the Marshall Islands. After securing Roi and Namur, Japanese bombers returned -- and almost all supplies were lost. Chuck lost 30 pounds eating Japanese rice. Large men lost as much as 60 pounds before new supplies arrived.

In the Saipan, Chuck's ammunition carrier took a direct hit from a mortar and was killed. Chuck was wounded. After being rescued by an Army tank crew, Chuck spent three months in a hospital in Honolulu. He asked to be reassigned to his unit and was sent to Tinian. When he got there, he found that his unit had been shipped home. However, while he was on Tinian, he saw a strange-looking B-52, i.e. Enola Gay, take off. The war was over. The Navy offered him the rank of chief to re-enlist. But being lonely and weary of war, Chuck returned to the United States and his grandparents' home. Along with an honorable discharge from the Navy, Chuck was awarded: Asiatic Pacific Theatre Ribbon Two Stars, Presidential Citation One Star, Purple Heart, Letter of Commendation, Victory Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, American Theatre.

Rest In Peace!


Short Rounds

Five of the eight men to be awarded two Medals of Honor are U.S. Marines.

They are:

Smedley D. Butler
Daniel J. Daily
Louis Cukela
Joseph King
John H. Pruitt


I found the story about LtGen. Cheatham to be disrespectful! Since when do you refer to an officer by his first name. Whether his decision right or wrong is in no way for a "Marine" to be disrespectful.

As I am sure Mr. Wear is aware, during intense combat, not all decisions are made correctly or to the satisfaction of everyone concerned.

Joe Henderson
Sgt. USMC.
1963-1967


Quotes

"Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one."
--Marcus Aurelius


"We can and must write in a language which sows among the masses hate, revulsion, and scorn toward those who disagree with us."
--Vladimir Lenin


"As a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights. Where an excess of power prevails, property of no sort is duly respected. No man is safe in his opinions, his person, his faculties, or his possessions."
--James Madison, 1792


"The deadliest weapon in the world is a MARINE and his rifle!"
--Gen. John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing, US Army


"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
--George Orwell


"The day the soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership."
--Colin Powell


"Flip flop, hippity hop, mob stop!"

"You people are a herd, I would call you a mob, but a mob has a leader."

"Road guards out!"

"House mouse to the duty hut!"

God Bless the American Dream!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 25 SEP 2014

In this issue:
• RPG Magnets
• Is My Team Alright
• The Chosen One

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

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These photos were sent in by one of our long time customers, Grace Washburn. The pictured Devil Pup is Bruce The Moose... Showing off his Marine Corps attitude and his dress blues.

Teresa Bolhuis
Customer Service Rep


What's The Odds

Had a girlfriend Pricilla before entering boot camp at PI in April 1958. One morning at formation in front of 2nd Battalion barracks I was called out in front of the platoon. While standing there trembling and eyes locked forward, my peripheral vision picked up another DI standing beside our platoon 246, junior DI, Sgt. Breedlowe Reeves. Nothing was said to me, I was just being looked over and then told to return to the formation. Turns out that the mystery DI's name was Sgt. Gleason of Platoon 247 in the same company barracks. He was, I found out later, the brother of my girl Pricilla. What's the odds, eh?

Anyone out there from Plt. 246 gimme a shout:
johnbolan[at]hotmail.com

Cpl. J Bolan 1560XXX
1958-1962
God Bless all Marines


RPG Magnets

Ernie Cheatham was the CO of Task Force X-ray... the entire organization of Marines that were tasked to clear the City of Hue during the 1968 Tet "celebration". I do not know where he was during the first few days of the fighting... but suffice it to say that our four tanks spent the vast majority of our time serving as a shield for the hapless Marine grunts who were thrown into the meat grinder and with carrying the wounded to be medivaced or their lifeless bodies to Grave Registration. See the attached photos...

When Ernie showed his sorry azs inside of the city limits, he screamed over the radios, "Get those big f-cking, noisy RPG magnets away from my men!"

He did not care that we "saved the day" more often that he could ever imagine.

Ours is not to wonder why. Ours is to do or die.

John Wear


Is My Team Alright

Hello Sgt. Grit,

This year just like last year you were gracious enough to forward us a large box of merchandise for our raffle at our annual Veterans Appreciation Picnic! Everything went well and the items you sent us were snatched up almost immediately.

I had contacted the local Marine Corps Recruiting station and advised them that we would like them to join us as we were honoring "one of our own". The SNCOIC, SSGT Lariosa didn't even hesitate he said "My MARINES will be there sir!" When the 3 young MARINES arrived I found it hard to believe that they came in dress blues. When I asked them why one of them said "You did say we were honoring one of our own didn't you Gunny?" They all looked like baby's but then I remember all those years ago where the same was said about us.

The young man we were honoring was Cpl of Marines Joshua Hotaling. In 2012 as a 20 year old Marine he was doing "Sweeper Duty", looking for IED's and any other unexploded ordinance that could hurt him or his fellow Marines. Well sure as h-ll he missed one. Joshua lost both of his legs and had severe and traumatic injuries to his arms, chest, and hands! His mother told me that when he came to, two weeks later in a hospital in Germany his first words were "Is my team alright?" Spoken like a true MARINE! I have to tell you that as I told his story I had to really fight the emotions.

As you can see by the pictures, I have included he gets around pretty well but still has his days as he calls them. Ever since meeting this young man I have said that I wish I could meet the creators of the cartoon G.I Joe Greatest American Hero because I would certainly would have brought them to this picnic and introduced them to a "Real American Hero!

In closing I again thank you for all that you have done to help make our picnic great and we hope to speak with you when we start getting ready for next year's picnic! Oh and by the way, I asked Cpl Hotaling if he really had a disability and he said "No sir Gunny, just an inconvenience." The tears then really flowed!

Semper Fi
P.A. Reyes
GySgt (ret)


Wasn't In The Bag

I was medivaced from VietNam in Dec. of '66 to the Philippines for the night. It was the first time I had seen real food in a while, so I was fairly excited. After about two bites of food and one COLD chocolate milk, I was stuffed! The next day I was sent to Yokosuta, Japan. I didn't have anything but the clothes on my back. It's funny about money, I had left all my money on the books except $10.00 a month. Upon arrival I had to have a razor and toothbrush, etc., so I got them from the red cross. I was given a slip like a grocery slip with the charges on it, so I had to pay for these things. I had to pay for it when I got my money coming in. Now for the subject of this email. Four years after I was released from the Navy, a Mistletoe Express truck pulled to my house with the missing bags. Inside were two or three pair of OD green skivvies, a VC wood chopping Knife, out cover, which was an Australian bush hat and a letter from Terry Gee about my stripes (because I had made E5, He made E4, so he took mine) and about some money that people owed me. Terry said he gathered up the money and got a money order, but the money order wasn't in the bag, ha ha.

HM4 (Doc) Jerry Huckleberry
1st Mar Div Recon
Chu Lai, Vietnam


Edson's Raiders

Sgt Grit,

While reading the last newsletter, I noted several book recommendations by readers. One about Carlson's Raiders and another about Iwo.

I would like to add one more, which I consider one of the best narratives of the exploits (Guadalcanal, Tulai, Savo, etc.) of Edson's 1st Raider Battalion. The book is: Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II.

The story of the remarkable men of 1st Marine Raider Battalion, known by the name of its founding commander, the legendary jungle fighter Merritt A. "Red Mike" Edson. My Dad, Warren Morse served as machine gunner and later as platoon sergeant. He is now at his permanent duty station guarding the streets of Heaven (2001) Ron Morse (Sgt USMC, class of 69).

Find the mentioned book at Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II.


VMA(AW)533 Reunion

VMA(AW)533 celebrated a 45 year reunion, celebrating the last combat mission flown by VMA(AW)533, September 27,1969, out of Chu Lai. It was a tremendous reunion held at Cherry Point, that included a base tour sponsored by the base, a wonderful steak fry sponsored by VFW Post 7315 and banquet held at the Havelock Tourist and Event Center.

Special thanks to Kristy from Sgt Grit for sending a care package full of wonderful items from the catalog.

Jerry Callaway
SEMPER FI, '67-'71


Falling And Rising

Eugene Stoner was certainly a savvy arms designer. I share this story because when I recall it, I smile. In 1983 or 1984, Stoner came to Quantico with his new squad automatic weapon. The DevCtr asked then - Major Larry Livingston to meet Mr. Stoner on one of our Basic School ranges, and to assess the weapon for its utility in fire and maneuver. Larry was the Tactics Group Chief and he invited me, the Combined Arms Group Chief to accompany him for the evaluation. Stoner fired the SAW first, moving forward rapidly, falling into the prone position and engaging targets about 150m out, rising and moving, falling and shooting. The funny part is that Stoner's DevCtr project assistant, a Master Sergeant whose name I cannot recall, ran alongside him — falling and rising as did Stoner — and used his utility cap to catch the disintegrating links from the hand-belted ammo. It seems Stoner had fabricated about five hundred links for such demonstrations, and had to reuse them many times. Major Livingston and I then had the opportunity to do the same fire-and-maneuver drill. We both thought the AR was a little heavy and awkward to lift when leaving one prone position to run to the next, but aside from that, we were both quite impressed with the SAW, and happy that at last the rifle squad would have a true AR and common ammunition that could be readily redistributed at the final coordination line as required in the attack. Such was not the case with the BAR.

Tom Harleman, LtCol (Ret), Ph.D.


You Can Figure Out The Results

Sgt. Grit

I was thinking about my entry into World War II. After Boot Camp and Training, I was loaded onto an AP (AP's were like an APA but I don't think they had as many landing Craft an APA had). I was dumped as Casual onto Guam about five days after the island was secured, there were six of us. I don't know why but soon we were put on a plane and flown to Ulithi.

Somehow, somewhere, our Records were lost and the six of us had to smoke C-Ration Cigarettes as we had no money to buy cigarettes. We were transferred from Pillar to post because no one knew what the H-ll to do with us. We borrowed $5.00 monthly, "Health & Comfort" money from the Red Cross. Finally we found a home and they had to start New Record books and Pay Records for us. We were paid and ushered into the CO's Office (tent) where a Red Cross Guy (with Malaria so bad he was sweating up a storm) was entering a bad Debt Charge against us for not Paying the Red Cross back. We had only received our Pay a few hours before!

My Total Pay at the time was less than $20.00 Monthly. (My base pay was $50 and I was sending home $25 to my Mother and paying $5.35 for my NSLI Insurance). So I gave the Red Cross guy $15.00 from total of about $50.00 (I received for 3 months back Pay) and by the time I paid back all the money I borrowed I had nothing much left.

I received a bunch of Mail with a letter from my Mother that said she had received a Telegram from Washington, that I was missing in Action, but she knew it wasn't true because she had received mail from me dating after I was declared Missing. I have been trying to find those letters but the one who got all the boxes of stuff from Mother, had left them somewhere.

That's the problem with staying in the Marine Corps and traveling, all the stuff is left with others and what's important to you isn't to them so some of it isn't saved. Now after 26 Years of service and over 65 years Retired, most of my immediate family are somewhere else and so is the stuff that was sent home during World War II.

During World War II you were required to have NSLI (National Service Life Insurance) which cost us $5.35 Monthly. During the Korean War, Insurance was Free but they didn't pay your Heir Cash, only monthly payments. So I had kept my NSLI Insurance, making sure my Wife would get 10 Grand Cash, better than about a hundred dollars a month. I still have my NSLI Insurance and pay something better than $10.00 a month and they have cut in Half what my wife will receive... BUT... all these years I have been getting an NSLI Dividend check which has been Used as Christmas Money.

I have to say something here. A lot of your readers think some of this is Hooey or Bull Cr-p, but you gotta remember the 1939 Marine Corps was suddenly boasted from about 19,000 (more cops in NYC than U.S. Marines) to a top of 750,000 Marines in 1945. You can figure out the results.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau


Showing Off Sgt Grit Swag

I bought the "get off my asz" sticker so I wouldn't have to worry about other drivers tailgating us. It makes me nervous when I have my girls in the truck. Sometimes it works. But I bought the pole holder off amazon. When I went to Home Depot. I met a young man with autism. It was his idea to not cut the 10 foot pipe. I agreed. He said two flags are more to see. When he saw the flags I put up. He gave me a hug. I will fly the flags I bought from you proudly. Thank you. I will send photos in November they go up with a new Autism awareness flag. Thank you again.

Semper Fi
The Dougherty-Gomes Family

Browse our wide selection of Flags and Bumper Stickers.


2/4, 1/7, 106's

Sgt Bisher,

Read your piece concerning the battalion's original sign at the entrance to 2/4. I was with 1/7, January '66 to February '67. Spent my time on various hills around Chu Lai, from the mouth of the Song Tra Bong river (Lantry Hill) to PF Hill (about a mile from Highway 1). I recall hearing that 2/7's area started on the other side of Highway 1. I assume we were based around Chu Lai, which I only saw upon arrival in January and upon departure in February. I recall going to "Regiment" by 6-By once, to mail a package home.

Since I was with 106's, a section (2) 106's were attached to each of the line companies, we pretty much operated without direction from our platoon commander or platoon sergeant. Never really knew where "on the map" I was.

Just wondered where 2/4 was situated? You may have participated in Operations Piranha or Starlite which occurred prior to my arrival.

Hard to believe that we were there so long ago. Can never forget the brothers lost in Operation Indiana, may they be with the Lord.

Semper Fi,
Sgt Juan Reyna
1965 - 1968
MSgt USMCR
1973 - 1987


Not Trying To Kill You

A letter of encouragement I wrote to a young lady I know. She's currently enjoying a few months at MCRD, Parris Island, SC.

Recruit Collins,

By now, some of what you were told previously is starting to become painfully obvious. You're no longer the free-spirited high-school cadet we all knew. You've been immersed into a culture totally foreign to anything you've encountered before. You're a recruit attempting to earn our cherished EGA. Each day you wake up and wonder what challenges are ahead, and each night you lie in your rack with doubts. No worries, we've all gone through the same mental process. Countless other young people have taken the same steps... have stood on the hallowed yellow footprints and shouldered the proud heritage and traditions of our beloved Marine Corps. Not all have made it, but all have been changed by the experience.

Don't think you're going through this mental and physical torture alone. You're not. Look around you. You're in the midst of other young recruits all attempting to climb the same mountain. They're part of your fire team, your squad... your platoon. They're your team mates, your comrades, and someday they might be the Marines on your right and on your left. Look to them for support, for help, for assistance. But above all, be there for them. Remember the Corps is a living organism. It has many parts and many functions, but as a team we move forward to reach the objective collectively. You'll see this unity come to fruition when you face the Crucible together. Have heart! Have confidence! Believe in yourself! Believe in your fellow recruits! Believe in your Drill Instructors! Believe in your training!

Speaking of your Drill Instructors, just know they're there to guide you as well. Despite all appearances, they're not trying to kill you. They've been tasked, and have accepted, the supreme challenge of molding a gaggle of brats into a finely-tuned platoon of basically-trained Marines. Their assignment is the very foundation of our Corps, for without well-trained Marines our Corps would be short lived. They'll instill in each of their charges the proud history of our Corps. They'll teach you our storied heritage, and traditions. They'll infuse each of you with our proud ethos. And when you stand at attention and receive your EGA, you'll understand the role they played. They'll be a part of you forever.

We at the VFW and Marine Corps League know you'll be successful. We're confident in you! Take each day's challenges with the knowledge that we old Marines know you're in good hands, and that our Corps has many glorious chapters yet to write. You and your fellow recruits will take your place amongst our ranks. When we see you again, you'll be a MARINE!

Semper Fi!

J. H. Hardin
Sgt, USMC
'78 – '84


Garage Sale Treasure

I found this great matchbook at a garage sale.

Sgt. C. Jones
1963-1967
RVN 1966


25 Pager

Dear Sgt Grit,

We all received letters from our girlfriends in boot camp! I was dating a sweet girl, a little nuts, but fun, and I was just only 18 and in love. This zany chick has 2 dogs and they were adorable and friendly. Their names were Princess and Pogo - let me go into greater detail as I never thought that she or those dogs could get a recruit into such deep doodoo as it was a nightmare. Her name was Jackie and she was tall - her parents divorced and she had a wealthy background. I wrote her a real fast one page letter saying that I would like to hear from her and I was lonely for her smile and missed her friendship. (big big mistake) the DI always ragged on the ones who received packages and overweight letters. Some clown got cookies from grandma - and the DI made him open the tin - and made him eat all the inserts from the tin (cardboard and paper that the cookies were wrapped in) ERGO - no more cookies from Grandma!

My little lovely sent me a 25 page letter (both sides) about how she missed me and included some things that the DI had me read out loud - embarrassing the sh-t out of me. He even wanted me to go into great detail about what was between the lines - I refused and then had to do 100 sit-ups and pull-ups and deep knee bends - then when exhausted the DI told me - "night tonight Dear - you have an important engagement in the morning - you are leading the morning run Sweet Heart!" That night he made me read all 25 pages to the platoon - and he made me crawl around the squad bay barking like a dog - and made me eat one page a night - and told me write that crazy New York lunatic and tell her no more 25 page letters or he would shove it my Azs! The envelope was covered with pictures of dogs and each page of the letter were cartoon characters. This gal was very artistic and talented and landed me in a world of trouble.

The best part was after I graduated the 3 DI's made me laugh about it and all was good. The Drill Instructors could make you a world of pain - or make you laugh so hard your sides hurt. Ergo - they were only human with a tremendous undertaking to make us Marines.

Time marches on - the girl Jackie - was seen by me once after I left the Marines - amazing when you leave the Marines with a pair of B-lls - or maybe wiser ones - you are a different person.

Bruce Bender
Vietnam Era Marine
1963-1967


Special Marine Corps Birthday 240th Bash

Nov.8th-15th 2015 on Carnival Magic out of Galveston, TX. Ports of Call Cozumel, Honduras, and Belize. $100 "on board credit" per cabin!

Special Group pricing on this cruise. All prices include taxes and fees.

Inside Cabin 4B $652.44 pp, Balcony 8B $932.44. Ocean view and Suites available upon request. $50.00 Deposit pp. Final payment due Aug. 2015.

Contact Pat Perry at(405) 373-4157 or pattperry@sbcglobal.net.


USMC T-shirt With Rifles On It

Hi. As I had told you in a previous email, I was upset that a Marine was asked to leave an amusement park because he had a USMC shirt on and it had rifles on it. Well, I ordered a shirt from you folks with 2 rifles on it as well as a skull to wear the day I was going to this very same park. I was asked to step aside at the entry gate of Great Adventure, 6 Flags, NJ, by the ticket taker/security guard. I asked why I was being pulled to the side and all he said was have a nice day sir and to wait here. I knew exactly what was happening and I was so excited. LOL - with that 4 security guards who are actually 6 Flags police Officers approached me and started examining my shirt. I looked at them and smiled. Then I simply warned them "if you think I'm leaving this park for wearing a USMC tee shirt, you're mistaken and I assure you I am more scary than any of your roller coasters." LMAO - They couldn't believe it and then I said "what are we doing here?" I was politely told to proceed into the park and have a great day.

These guys "got it" and I am sure they don't agree with the policy either. I then heard a woman behind me telling them that they should give me a free ticket and a waffle cone? LOL - Semper Fi!


Pogey Bait

I had to chuckle at SWAK on envelope. When I was at MCRD in 1958 my girl sent me a letter with a stick of gum in it. When S/Sgt Lawler felt the gum he called me up front and said, aw his main squeeze sent him some pogey bait, here chew it. As I started to open the envelope, he said did I say you could open the letter, I said chew the gum. I have often wondered, as the entire letter passed through my digestive system what the letter said, and it didn't taste very good.

Semper Fi
L/Cpl Cary Proffitt
'58 to '63


Crossed Or Not Crossed

Hey Sgt. Grit,

In regards to Russ Hagerthey's comment "If you have crossed rifles on your chevron's you were not in the Old Corps."

Well, try telling that to Marines like Gunny Rousseau, and many other WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Vets, including me.

I served from July 1951, through September 1961, and am a Korea Vet (August 1952 Through September 1953). Was a Buck Sergeant twice, E-4 then promoted to Sergeant E-5 on the first change over in 1958.

Old Corps is relative to when you were in versus when another person was in, e.g., Boot verses Old Salt.

Semper Fi Marines!
Old Corps, New Corps, Boots, and Old Salts.

John Vogel, Sgt. w/crossed rifles


The Company Commander

This was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page on 17 September 2014. The picture shows a Marine Lance Corporal being inspected by a Marine Captain while on float. The text on the picture reads, "The way the Company Commander looks when he inspects a Lance Corporal with a ribbon stack that is bigger than his... Priceless..."

Here are a few of the comments left in reference to the picture.


J. Hunter - Let's see; Capt needs a shave, the L/Cpl he is inspecting needs to square away that p-ss cutter he is wearing; he is wearing it like he is flippin' burgers at a Steak n Shake.


D. Miller Jr. - Listen up ya bunch of land luving, pantie twisting, muffler s-cking, elbow digging, mother eyeballing, mouth breathers you know if you put your uniform on you would like a wiener dog stuck in a paper towel roll, but thats not the point. The point is we are and always will be... Marines! Semper Fi ya bunch of pit digging, powder burning Jarheads! OOO RAH


C. Cassio - that happen to me, a retread PFC, my section leader gave a similar look. He said that those ribbons better be in my SRB. He was corrected by our Company Gunny after formation.


R. Eggert - Something like this happened when we got a new Captain on board. We had a Cpl. who had ribbons up to his shoulder. Capt. asked if he should check the Cpl's SRB to verify that he was entitled to all of them. Cpl got a little nervous and said no sir. Capt asked why. Best answer yet, Cpl told him he'd find a few more that he doesn't have room for. Capt lost color and moved on. Very hard to keep from cracking up.


Read more of the comments that were left on the Sgt Grit Facebook page.


Gung Ho SeaBag

Grit,

Just reading your latest newsletter and have a few comments. Bill McDermont on Gung-Ho Lt.Col. Carlson was not just visiting the Chinese, He was embedded and fought with the Chinese Nationalist against the Chinese Communist as a China Marine who used the GUNG-ho (All Together).

R.R Lopez

I guess some things never change, the dock works and airport baggage works over the years certainly must have a lot of souvenir's. My Sea Bag and Locker Box never was found when I came back from the Pacific in 1945 along with a lot of other Marines. Same thing happened when I returned from Korea in 1952. Security both times I assume was no longer a top priority.

Semper-Fi & Gung-Ho
MGYSGT W Schroeder
XX19137
Keep the Great News Letter coming
Thanks Grit & Staff


The Chosen One

Hey, Sgt. Grit! And "OooRah!" to all my fellow Marines.

I joined our mighty Corps in July 1969, as a matter of fact, our series were one of the last to stay in the old "Quonset Huts" at MCRD. Anyway, toward the end of our training, we were moved to the newly built air conditioned barracks, which in comparison was like staying at a Hilton Hotel.

I have read a few stories of boot camp letters to a few unfortunate souls that were singled out by their DI. Well, my story does not have any DI reference, other than the fact that when you heard a command from your DI, you had better be quick to fall in!

It was a Sunday morning, and after returning from church service, we were given a couple of hours of personal time to catch up of laundry, cleaning your M14 for the next inspection, or polishing your brass. I pretty much kept my gear squared away, and decided to use the time to write letters to my sweethearts. I use the plural because I made the mistake of leaving two girlfriends back home. I preaddressed each letter to save time, and began to write each girl a heartfelt letter with all the sweet wording a young boot could muster. (As you know, we weren't officially "Marines" til after graduation.) I was thoroughly consumed with my last letter, when our DI came out of the duty hut and ordered us to put up all materials, and get ready to go out for drill. Needless to say, everyone was running around in a panic, and in the same panic mood, I put away my letter writing material, and placed each letter in the envelopes. It wasn't until two weeks later that I found out that I had placed each letter in the wrong envelopes. The two girls knew of each other, and got together to compare letters, and both gave me the ultimatum of choosing. One of the girls was more consistent in writing than the other, and chose her. Soon after, I completed my ITR training, specialty training, and off to Vietnam. Consistently writing to the one girl I had chosen. After being in country a little over 2 months, I received that one dreaded letter that every Marine dreads... the infamous "Dear John" letter from the one girl I thought would wait for me. But it just goes to show... "what goes around, comes around!"

Cpl. A.P. Cruz
USMC 1969-1971


8 Months After

I returned from Vietnam in Aug of '68. One of my, nearly empty sea bags came with me. My sea bag with all of my gear and some souvenirs that I had bought in Vietnam and Okinawa. My top stayed on my azs for the time I was stationed at Alvin Chandler NAS until I was Honorable Discharged in June of '69.

About 8 months after I got home my sea bag arrived. There was a few uniforms and Not One Of My Souvenirs was in the sea bag. I hope that the person or persons enjoyed them.

Semper Fi,
Jim Potter


Marine Corps Life, Marine Corps Style

This was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page on 16 September 2014. The picture shows Marines during an onstage hypnotism. The text on the picture reads, "Gunny told the Plt Sgt that the SACO lecture was at 0700... The Plt Sgt wanted everyone seated by 0600... Sgt Hardknocks had you at the chow hall by 0500... Cpl Awesome had you in PT formation at 0400... LCpl Schmuckatelli (was on barracks duty) sounded Reveille at 0300... Your Plt got in from a night on the town at 0200... Out-frickin'-standing!"

Here are a few of the comments left in reference to the picture.


A. Cook - Dragging your b-tt in just in time for PT formation, Oh I miss those days!


C. Hatch - yep; we all could write our own chapter and publish a book about those moments.


K. Smith - I'm sorry, but I think that is Soooo cute! Our boys go through this, and still defend our country! Semper Fi! Men, the "average" person would have run away crying and complaining! The Marine don't play that.


G. Davidson - Ha ha! I was the SACO, so I rolled in at 0645.


L.J. Deguzman - And the busted down Pfc is in formation at 0400 going "we probably don't have to be there till 0700."


D. Avelar - To be a young Marine again...


Read more of the comments that were left on the Sgt Grit Facebook page.


Camouflaged F4 Phantoms

Did the Marines ever have camouflaged F4 Phantoms?

I just finished reading a book written by a Viet Nam veteran Marine that referred to a camouflage painted Marine F4 Phantom that flew close air support for his unit. I know the Navy did not have camo Phantoms but the Air Force did. Can't recall ever seeing a camo Marine aircraft.

Cpl J.W. Riner - 2575... M14 era


BullSh-t Detector

I could use a little help. I was at a group event for vets suffering from PTSD. All ages were there from Korean Vets to Iraq and Afghan Vets. At the meeting was a man describing himself as a Marine Nam veteran. A former chopper pilot.

His story was that as part of his officer contract, he could go off in the jungle by himself and stalk the NVA/VC. According to this man, he would go out on his own, find some sad azs VC that was sleeping on post and put a white feather on the VC's chest. It was his own form of psy/op warfare. My bullsh-t detector immediately went on high alert. I told the man I had never heard of this kind of action.

Then he pulled out a board he had made that had all his combat ribbons arranged like one would have on their chest. Surprise, surprise, surprise he had a POW ribbon. Yes, he had been captured and escaped. OK, my BS detector is going red line. The final insult to me was his Silver Star ribbon was subordinate to his Bronze Star ribbon. He didn't even know which ribbon was which. That was enough for me. I went nuclear. I told him he was full of sh-t. That he needed to immediately stop being a Marine impostor or I was going to mess up his health record. That was the end of that nonsense. I see this man in town occasionally. As far as I know, he doesn't tell that story anymore.

It amazes me how many Marine want to be's are out there.

Has anyone heard anything anymore preposterous?

Sgt. Hougher
Charlie 1/5, 1970


Reunited With Three Of My Vietnam Marine Brothers

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Last month on August 14th I had the honor and privilege to reunite with three of my Vietnam Marine brothers in Tomball, Texas. We had not seen each other in 46 years! We traveled from Connecticut, Michigan, California, and Texas. After a few tears and mighty bear hugs we started jowl jacking like it had only been a week since we last met. We laughed and told stories about the funny stuff and practical jokes we did to each other in Chu Lai in 1967 and 1968.

We laughed and lied about who saved who for four wonderful days. I gave each one of my brothers a Sgt. Grit metal sign that read, "Warning. This House Is Protected By The Good Lord And A U. S. Marine." We all participated on August 16th in the "Run For The Fallen" in Hempstead, Texas. Every military service member from Texas who gave the ultimate sacrifice was honored. Each name was read by volunteers. Governor Perry gave permission for the flags in the town square to be flown at half-mast while the names were being read.

The "Run For the Fallen" is the most patriotic, reverent, and uplifting event I have ever seen. I give many thanks and props to "Operation Military Embrace", operationmilitaryembrace.com, a 501C3 organization that put the event together for the fifth year in a row with help from many sponsors and the great city of Hempstead. OME gives 100% of every donated dollar to wounded service members and their families. Everyone working for OME is a volunteer and they work to honor our service members and to give them and their families a hand up in their time of need.

Thank you Sgt. Grit for all that you do for our military service members.

Semper Fi,
SSgt "Tee" Turner
USMC 1965-1971
RVN Nov. '67 - Nov. '68


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #1)

I returned to the hotel and laid down for a while. I skipped dinner. I called the front desk and asked if there might be a TV available for the evening. They said there was but there would be a charge for it. Then they said there would not be a charge because I had been there for three nights. It arrived as before and was set up. I recall watching parts of a roller derby show and Frank Sinatra on another channel. I didn't think much of either of them. I took a shower and went to sleep. I awoke at the usual time, about 5:00 AM. I laid there and mulled over my plans for the day. I got up and did a few exercises for the first time in three weeks. I took a shower and shaved and went to the dining room for a brunch. I returned to the room and rested for a few minutes. Then I got up and put on my Dress Blues and headed for Earlham to surprise 'the love of my life'. I timed it right and passed through the gate at exactly 1:00. I drove to her housing unit (I cannot for the life of me recall the name of that building), parked the car and walked into the lounge. There must have been about 50 people there. I did not see Mary among them. I went up to the desk and asked a young lady if she would do me a favor. She said "Gladly. What would you like?" I said "Please do not tell her who is here - but call Room #8 and tell Mary she is wanted in the lounge." She picked up the phone and did just that. Fortunately, Mary was in the room. She answered and said "I'll be right down." The room was rather quiet for one with so many people in it. I watched the place where she would enter. All of a sudden she was there. She spotted me instantly and pressed her hands over her mouth to keep from screaming out loud. She ran to me and wrapped her arms around my neck. I wrapped my arms around her and we had another of those lovely kisses - but not as long as yesterday. As if we had been apart for ages she said "Oh, it's so good to see you! What a surprise! How long can you stay?" I told her "We have 'til 5:00, when visiting hours are over."

Everybody in the lounge, it seemed, had their eyes on us. I asked her "Would you like to go into Richmond?" She said "Can we?" I told her to ask the girl at the desk. She did. Her file was checked and she was told "If this is Sgt. Freas, yes, you can leave the campus - but make sure you are back by 5:00." As usual, she was dressed to the nines. She looked like a million dollars. She said "Let me get my purse - and my I.D. - and change my shoes. I'll be right back." She was back in a couple of minutes and we headed for the gate. The guard asked for her I.D. and checked it against his file. He did not ask for mine. He said "I checked his a few minutes ago. "I am sure he is your escort. Have fun."

We went down to the park and walked around the lake. Then we went to a soda shop for a huge milkshake which we shared. We took our time. Everyone was looking at us. And the 'blues' were hot. We returned to the campus and drove slowly all over the place. We returned to her housing unit just before 5:00, went inside, held hands for a few minutes, kissed and exchanged 'I love yous' and I left her again.

'til next week. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


But It Didn't Happen

Noted the editorial note about the squid recruits being across the creek at MCRD SD in the sixties... might point out that between the grinder and that channel of water is one headquarters building, and a whole bunch of lawn and some officer quarters... if y'all saw squidlets, you had to have been (for some reason...?) down around the automotive hobby shop or on a run dog leg at the west end of the Lindbergh Field runway (airport long since extended)... a common run went along the airfield fence, left at the end, out to the chained/padlocked chain link fencing gate at Harbor Drive, U-turn, and back, etc. At the point, there was only a chain link fence separating MCRD, and NTC (Naval Training Center)... and you might see 'companies' of squidlets marching with their dummy rifles (somewhat like those used by high school marching bands/flag girls etc... looked like M1903 Springfields)... This area also had an old concrete loading dock, and circa 1964-1965, was where Facility Maintenance would dump concrete rubble. Said rubble was part of the plan of the day for Correctional Custody Platoon, as they would reduce the concrete (and the loading dock) back into aggregate... with sledgehammers. Once in a while, the DI's from CC would apprehend a Navy recruit who had made it over the fence, probably waiting for darkness to get further AWOL. This poor soul would be invited to join the Marine recruits... knew of one who was 'retained' in CC for a couple of days, with the knowledge and connivance of his 'Company Commander'... probably a Chief Petty Officer, who had spent some time in 'gator freighters' (amphibious shipping... APAs, LSTs, etc.) and knew about Marines... the recruit reportedly was very happy to return to NTC when his Company Commander came to get him... For the two years that I know of, following the inception of CC and (across the street, Motivation), the recidivism rate was 0... sentence was three days, no marks in the SRB... and nobody wanted seconds... ever... and there was no maltreatment (hitting, slapping, punching, kicking, etc... just some real professionals... intensely demanding... one of them was responsible for introducing She Who Must Be Obeyed to me... have long since forgiven him...).

Earlier had commented ('the vision thing') about one of our flankers finding a NVA Bn cache of packs (Hastings, July of '66)... have forgotten the LCPL's name, but he recently portrayed a DA in a TV drama... (gonna have to e-mail his squad leader... "Sprinks"... or Eddie Sinkfield... to overcome that brain fart... and if that label for flatus offends you... you're definitely on the wrong website...)... anyway, having found the cooking gear and moved on until told to hold up by the CP group, we were doing the usual... standing around, waiting, watching... it was at least just hot, if shady, when the LCPL said "hey, SSGT D... come look at this"... he had found a mound of packs, covered with recently cut vegetation... upon further exploration of the area, we found four or five more such mounds... all new gear. This pretty much assured that we had gone as far as we were going that day, as this find had to be exploited for intel. I recall that we took two or three fart sacks (mattress covers) full of documents, papers, etc. out of those piles... never did know where the fart sacks came from, but they were flown to Division G-2 for analysis. Most packs had a pair of new 'Ho Chi Minh' sandals (made from car or truck tires and inner tubes... like 'flip flops', and brand new blue sweat shirts, that had oval labels, printed in English, that read "Made In Hanoi"... uniform items, letters, pictures, small bundles of ammo wrapped in paper and tied with twine, with Chinese characters, caps similar to later USMC boonie hats, etc. We were surprised to find some of the pictures were of NVA soldiers with their girlfriends... a strip of four pictures... as if they had put $.50 in a Greyhound bus station photo booth. Since all we had known since coming ashore on this and other operations was enervating heat/humidity we were really puzzled at the sweatshirts... but a couple of days later, we were considerably higher on that mountain... and understood maybe why they had included those in their kit. Officer map cases (my assumption) had fountain pens and colored pencils... two colours, one at each end, stamped in English 'made in Hanoi" (I still have a couple... along with a map case, some ammo, a machete, and a haversack that I carried instead of our M1941 issue pack on later operations... good design, simple, plenty capacity, and light...) The stuff all had a faint odor of NVA rations... which, from best guess, was a mixture of rice, millet, and garlic powder...

On the subject of Lucky Strike Green... like those who are absolutely now convinced, having told the same story for forty plus years about receiving 1943 C-rations... I know that by now, in your heart of hearts, that you believe it... but it didn't happen. (trust me... or do the research on your own... the MCI, Meal, Combat, Individual, did not exist until the 1960s... nor did the four-pack of Luckies with green ink exist... older C-rats, circa 1950's, had an entire pack of cigarettes... not a four pack and they were mostly white with the circular logo BT,DT). There was an advertising slogan in the early 1940's about "Lucky Strike Green has gone to war"... the green ink, for some reason, was critical to the war effort... and Lucky Strike went from green to white packaging. I did once see some of the WWII green ink... FLSG-B at Dong Ha and Quang Tri in 1969 had an XO who was generally suspected of being senile, or close to it... among other things, he had a mannerism when smoking that was a real affectation... and he had little to do... but one morning at the daily staff meeting he reported that the previous day he had been at what passed for a PX, and that there was no soap (Dial, Irish Spring, whatever) there for the troops to buy!... since this sorta coincided with the 3rd Mar Div units pulling out and retrograding up to Okinawa... (4th Marines had just come off Mutter's Ridge, as I recall)... we kinda had bigger fish to fry. However, the next morning Captain Tommy Thompson, a Mustang supply officer, came to the staff meeting with a case of salt-water soap... (WWII vintage)... that had Lucky Strike Green triangles on all eight corners... and told the Lt Col he had that problem handled. It was a big joke for everybody but the XO... who didn't get it. For those who have never had to shower with salt-water soap... be thankful. I suspect that in today's modern Navy, that 'water hours' and 'salt-water showers' are a thing of the past... or as we used to joke "Navy shower? can of Right Guard and clean skivvies..."

Ddick


Lost And Found

Looking for anyone who remembers serving with 84 year old Sgt Byron Coley. Byron doesn't own a computer. He is the step father to a friend of mine. Any messages for him can be sent to me at: usmc7280[at]yahoo.com, and I will forward them to his stepdaughter.

Cards or letters can be sent to:
Byron Coley
953 Long Pond Rd
Long Pond Twp., ME 04945


Short Rounds

To answer Dan Campbell's question on the spelling of Presley O'Bannon's last name as O'Banion, my half-brother is a direct descendent of Presley O'Bannon and during his genealogy research found that was just a variation of the spelling, especially back during that era. The correct spelling is indeed O'Bannon...

Julian Etheridge


Sgt Grit,

The stories that come with my Marine magazine are very funny, touching and sentimental it always takes me back to (boot camp 1967, plt 1041).

Keep up the great job, I will keep ordering and passing your magazine to other Marines who do not know about you. God Bless Semper Fi...

Pfc A.R. Hernandez
Plt 1041 Honor Man

Thank you Gunny Padilla, Staff Sgt Warner, Sgt Shearer...


In response to this week's newsletter, OUTSTANDING!

SEMPER FI


"You have to poke 'em and stroke 'em" LtCol Joe Wilson, CO 4/14, on leadership, during the battalion MCCRES at Fort Pickett, VA, July 1983, as told to Maj Joe Kerke, CO K-4/14.

SEMPER FIDELIS.


Murphy,

If you are wanting to "blow smoke" up someone's azs. This is not the place. These guys can spot a phony a mile away.

Dave G.
B/1/9
May '67-June '68


Thank you Olivia, and to all the Sgt. Grit Staff. In my 25 years or so fo doing business with "The Gritster" he and his staff have always made things right. Outstanding job today as yesterday.

Outstanding Marine!

OOH-RAH

Pvt. James Hattabaugh
Ammo Co - 3rd Marine Amphibious Force
3rd Mar Div - Quang Nam, Province - I-Corps
1967-68


Sgt. Grit,

Just finished reading this week's newsletter and would like to comment on your article about the Navy boot camp across the fence from the Marine boot camp in San Diego. I was in platoon 2039, June thru August 1966. Our DI would march us to the fence on Sunday and while all the Navy boots were outside milling around and smoking, he would call us to attention and tell us to sing the Marine Corps him. We would all yell at the top of our lungs "him, him, f--k him"

Ed Gruener, SSgt


Quotes

"Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they've made a difference. The Marines don't have that problem."
--President Ronald Reagan


"Thus after successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp and fashioned him at will, the supreme power then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a network of small, complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate to rise above the crowd, The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent and guided: men are seldom forced by it to act, but are constantly restrained from acting. Such power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervates, extinguishes and stupefies a people, till each nation is reduced to nothing better than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd."
--Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (Vol. II, Book 4, Chapter 6)


"I want you boys to hurry up and whip these Germans so we can get out to the Pacific to kick the sh-t out of those purple-p-ssing Japanese, before the godd-mned Marines get all the credit!"
--LtGen George Patton, USA, 1945


"And once by God, I was a Marine!"
--Actor Lee Marvin, Circa, 1967, about serving in WW II


"If you were not there, you could not understand. If you were there, it is impossible to explain."
--Unknown


"Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a Freeman, contending for liberty on his own ground, is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth."
--George Washington, 1776


"The propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained."
--George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789


"I am convinced there is no smarter, handier or more adaptable body of troops (U.S. Marines) in the world…Always spick and span, ready at an instant's notice for duty, the nation owes them a great debt."
--American novelist Winston Churchill, 1917


"Mother Green!"

"Pvt sh-t stain, if u don't get squared away, I'm gonna recycle your azz back to the block, and you'll be suckin' fartz outta hospital sheets for a livin."

"Private, you got a Maggie's Drawers."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 25 SEP 2014

In this issue:
• RPG Magnets
• Is My Team Alright
• The Chosen One

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Bruce The Moose in dress blues

Bruce The Moose in campaign cover with sunglasses

These photos were sent in by one of our long time customers, Grace Washburn. The pictured Devil Pup is Bruce The Moose... Showing off his Marine Corps attitude and his dress blues.

Teresa Bolhuis
Customer Service Rep


What's The Odds

Had a girlfriend Pricilla before entering boot camp at PI in April 1958. One morning at formation in front of 2nd Battalion barracks I was called out in front of the platoon. While standing there trembling and eyes locked forward, my peripheral vision picked up another DI standing beside our platoon 246, junior DI, Sgt. Breedlowe Reeves. Nothing was said to me, I was just being looked over and then told to return to the formation. Turns out that the mystery DI's name was Sgt. Gleason of Platoon 247 in the same company barracks. He was, I found out later, the brother of my girl Pricilla. What's the odds, eh?

Anyone out there from Plt. 246 gimme a shout:
johnbolan[at]hotmail.com

Cpl. J Bolan 1560XXX
1958-1962
God Bless all Marines


Halloween T-shirt Special


RPG Magnets

Hue City Marines Taking Cover

Hue City injured Marines on Tank

Ernie Cheatham was the CO of Task Force X-ray... the entire organization of Marines that were tasked to clear the City of Hue during the 1968 Tet "celebration". I do not know where he was during the first few days of the fighting... but suffice it to say that our four tanks spent the vast majority of our time serving as a shield for the hapless Marine grunts who were thrown into the meat grinder and with carrying the wounded to be medivaced or their lifeless bodies to Grave Registration. See the attached photos...

When Ernie showed his sorry azs inside of the city limits, he screamed over the radios, "Get those big f-cking, noisy RPG magnets away from my men!"

He did not care that we "saved the day" more often that he could ever imagine.

Ours is not to wonder why. Ours is to do or die.

John Wear


Is My Team Alright

Cpl Hotaling at Veterans Appreciation Picnic

Cpl Hotaling receiving appreciation from Veterans

Hello Sgt. Grit,

This year just like last year you were gracious enough to forward us a large box of merchandise for our raffle at our annual Veterans Appreciation Picnic! Everything went well and the items you sent us were snatched up almost immediately.

I had contacted the local Marine Corps Recruiting station and advised them that we would like them to join us as we were honoring "one of our own". The SNCOIC, SSGT Lariosa didn't even hesitate he said "My MARINES will be there sir!" When the 3 young MARINES arrived I found it hard to believe that they came in dress blues. When I asked them why one of them said "You did say we were honoring one of our own didn't you Gunny?" They all looked like baby's but then I remember all those years ago where the same was said about us.

The young man we were honoring was Cpl of Marines Joshua Hotaling. In 2012 as a 20 year old Marine he was doing "Sweeper Duty", looking for IED's and any other unexploded ordinance that could hurt him or his fellow Marines. Well sure as h-ll he missed one. Joshua lost both of his legs and had severe and traumatic injuries to his arms, chest, and hands! His mother told me that when he came to, two weeks later in a hospital in Germany his first words were "Is my team alright?" Spoken like a true MARINE! I have to tell you that as I told his story I had to really fight the emotions.

As you can see by the pictures, I have included he gets around pretty well but still has his days as he calls them. Ever since meeting this young man I have said that I wish I could meet the creators of the cartoon G.I Joe Greatest American Hero because I would certainly would have brought them to this picnic and introduced them to a "Real American Hero!

In closing I again thank you for all that you have done to help make our picnic great and we hope to speak with you when we start getting ready for next year's picnic! Oh and by the way, I asked Cpl Hotaling if he really had a disability and he said "No sir Gunny, just an inconvenience." The tears then really flowed!

Semper Fi
P.A. Reyes
GySgt (ret)


Wasn't In The Bag

I was medivaced from VietNam in Dec. of '66 to the Philippines for the night. It was the first time I had seen real food in a while, so I was fairly excited. After about two bites of food and one COLD chocolate milk, I was stuffed! The next day I was sent to Yokosuta, Japan. I didn't have anything but the clothes on my back. It's funny about money, I had left all my money on the books except $10.00 a month. Upon arrival I had to have a razor and toothbrush, etc., so I got them from the red cross. I was given a slip like a grocery slip with the charges on it, so I had to pay for these things. I had to pay for it when I got my money coming in. Now for the subject of this email. Four years after I was released from the Navy, a Mistletoe Express truck pulled to my house with the missing bags. Inside were two or three pair of OD green skivvies, a VC wood chopping Knife, out cover, which was an Australian bush hat and a letter from Terry Gee about my stripes (because I had made E5, He made E4, so he took mine) and about some money that people owed me. Terry said he gathered up the money and got a money order, but the money order wasn't in the bag, ha ha.

HM4 (Doc) Jerry Huckleberry
1st Mar Div Recon
Chu Lai, Vietnam


Edson's Raiders

Edson's Raiders Book Cover

Sgt Grit,

While reading the last newsletter, I noted several book recommendations by readers. One about Carlson's Raiders and another about Iwo.

I would like to add one more, which I consider one of the best narratives of the exploits (Guadalcanal, Tulai, Savo, etc.) of Edson's 1st Raider Battalion. The book is: Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II.

The story of the remarkable men of 1st Marine Raider Battalion, known by the name of its founding commander, the legendary jungle fighter Merritt A. "Red Mike" Edson. My Dad, Warren Morse served as machine gunner and later as platoon sergeant. He is now at his permanent duty station guarding the streets of Heaven (2001) Ron Morse (Sgt USMC, class of 69).

Find the mentioned book at Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II.


239th USMC Birthday Items


VMA(AW)533 Reunion

Marines of VMA AW 533 at reunion

VMA AW 533 Flight Schedule from 27 September 1969

VMA(AW)533 celebrated a 45 year reunion, celebrating the last combat mission flown by VMA(AW)533, September 27,1969, out of Chu Lai. It was a tremendous reunion held at Cherry Point, that included a base tour sponsored by the base, a wonderful steak fry sponsored by VFW Post 7315 and banquet held at the Havelock Tourist and Event Center.

Special thanks to Kristy from Sgt Grit for sending a care package full of wonderful items from the catalog.

Jerry Callaway
SEMPER FI, '67-'71


Falling And Rising

Eugene Stoner was certainly a savvy arms designer. I share this story because when I recall it, I smile. In 1983 or 1984, Stoner came to Quantico with his new squad automatic weapon. The DevCtr asked then - Major Larry Livingston to meet Mr. Stoner on one of our Basic School ranges, and to assess the weapon for its utility in fire and maneuver. Larry was the Tactics Group Chief and he invited me, the Combined Arms Group Chief to accompany him for the evaluation. Stoner fired the SAW first, moving forward rapidly, falling into the prone position and engaging targets about 150m out, rising and moving, falling and shooting. The funny part is that Stoner's DevCtr project assistant, a Master Sergeant whose name I cannot recall, ran alongside him — falling and rising as did Stoner — and used his utility cap to catch the disintegrating links from the hand-belted ammo. It seems Stoner had fabricated about five hundred links for such demonstrations, and had to reuse them many times. Major Livingston and I then had the opportunity to do the same fire-and-maneuver drill. We both thought the AR was a little heavy and awkward to lift when leaving one prone position to run to the next, but aside from that, we were both quite impressed with the SAW, and happy that at last the rifle squad would have a true AR and common ammunition that could be readily redistributed at the final coordination line as required in the attack. Such was not the case with the BAR.

Tom Harleman, LtCol (Ret), Ph.D.


You Can Figure Out The Results

Sgt. Grit

I was thinking about my entry into World War II. After Boot Camp and Training, I was loaded onto an AP (AP's were like an APA but I don't think they had as many landing Craft an APA had). I was dumped as Casual onto Guam about five days after the island was secured, there were six of us. I don't know why but soon we were put on a plane and flown to Ulithi.

Somehow, somewhere, our Records were lost and the six of us had to smoke C-Ration Cigarettes as we had no money to buy cigarettes. We were transferred from Pillar to post because no one knew what the H-ll to do with us. We borrowed $5.00 monthly, "Health & Comfort" money from the Red Cross. Finally we found a home and they had to start New Record books and Pay Records for us. We were paid and ushered into the CO's Office (tent) where a Red Cross Guy (with Malaria so bad he was sweating up a storm) was entering a bad Debt Charge against us for not Paying the Red Cross back. We had only received our Pay a few hours before!

My Total Pay at the time was less than $20.00 Monthly. (My base pay was $50 and I was sending home $25 to my Mother and paying $5.35 for my NSLI Insurance). So I gave the Red Cross guy $15.00 from total of about $50.00 (I received for 3 months back Pay) and by the time I paid back all the money I borrowed I had nothing much left.

I received a bunch of Mail with a letter from my Mother that said she had received a Telegram from Washington, that I was missing in Action, but she knew it wasn't true because she had received mail from me dating after I was declared Missing. I have been trying to find those letters but the one who got all the boxes of stuff from Mother, had left them somewhere.

That's the problem with staying in the Marine Corps and traveling, all the stuff is left with others and what's important to you isn't to them so some of it isn't saved. Now after 26 Years of service and over 65 years Retired, most of my immediate family are somewhere else and so is the stuff that was sent home during World War II.

During World War II you were required to have NSLI (National Service Life Insurance) which cost us $5.35 Monthly. During the Korean War, Insurance was Free but they didn't pay your Heir Cash, only monthly payments. So I had kept my NSLI Insurance, making sure my Wife would get 10 Grand Cash, better than about a hundred dollars a month. I still have my NSLI Insurance and pay something better than $10.00 a month and they have cut in Half what my wife will receive... BUT... all these years I have been getting an NSLI Dividend check which has been Used as Christmas Money.

I have to say something here. A lot of your readers think some of this is Hooey or Bull Cr-p, but you gotta remember the 1939 Marine Corps was suddenly boasted from about 19,000 (more cops in NYC than U.S. Marines) to a top of 750,000 Marines in 1945. You can figure out the results.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau


Showing Off Sgt Grit Swag

Flags and Bumper Stickers on SUV

Flags unfurled on back of SUV

I bought the "get off my asz" sticker so I wouldn't have to worry about other drivers tailgating us. It makes me nervous when I have my girls in the truck. Sometimes it works. But I bought the pole holder off amazon. When I went to Home Depot. I met a young man with autism. It was his idea to not cut the 10 foot pipe. I agreed. He said two flags are more to see. When he saw the flags I put up. He gave me a hug. I will fly the flags I bought from you proudly. Thank you. I will send photos in November they go up with a new Autism awareness flag. Thank you again.

Semper Fi
The Dougherty-Gomes Family

Browse our wide selection of Flags and Bumper Stickers.


2/4, 1/7, 106's

Sgt Bisher,

Read your piece concerning the battalion's original sign at the entrance to 2/4. I was with 1/7, January '66 to February '67. Spent my time on various hills around Chu Lai, from the mouth of the Song Tra Bong river (Lantry Hill) to PF Hill (about a mile from Highway 1). I recall hearing that 2/7's area started on the other side of Highway 1. I assume we were based around Chu Lai, which I only saw upon arrival in January and upon departure in February. I recall going to "Regiment" by 6-By once, to mail a package home.

Since I was with 106's, a section (2) 106's were attached to each of the line companies, we pretty much operated without direction from our platoon commander or platoon sergeant. Never really knew where "on the map" I was.

Just wondered where 2/4 was situated? You may have participated in Operations Piranha or Starlite which occurred prior to my arrival.

Hard to believe that we were there so long ago. Can never forget the brothers lost in Operation Indiana, may they be with the Lord.

Semper Fi,
Sgt Juan Reyna
1965 - 1968
MSgt USMCR
1973 - 1987


Not Trying To Kill You

A letter of encouragement I wrote to a young lady I know. She's currently enjoying a few months at MCRD, Parris Island, SC.

Recruit Collins,

By now, some of what you were told previously is starting to become painfully obvious. You're no longer the free-spirited high-school cadet we all knew. You've been immersed into a culture totally foreign to anything you've encountered before. You're a recruit attempting to earn our cherished EGA. Each day you wake up and wonder what challenges are ahead, and each night you lie in your rack with doubts. No worries, we've all gone through the same mental process. Countless other young people have taken the same steps... have stood on the hallowed yellow footprints and shouldered the proud heritage and traditions of our beloved Marine Corps. Not all have made it, but all have been changed by the experience.

Don't think you're going through this mental and physical torture alone. You're not. Look around you. You're in the midst of other young recruits all attempting to climb the same mountain. They're part of your fire team, your squad... your platoon. They're your team mates, your comrades, and someday they might be the Marines on your right and on your left. Look to them for support, for help, for assistance. But above all, be there for them. Remember the Corps is a living organism. It has many parts and many functions, but as a team we move forward to reach the objective collectively. You'll see this unity come to fruition when you face the Crucible together. Have heart! Have confidence! Believe in yourself! Believe in your fellow recruits! Believe in your Drill Instructors! Believe in your training!

Speaking of your Drill Instructors, just know they're there to guide you as well. Despite all appearances, they're not trying to kill you. They've been tasked, and have accepted, the supreme challenge of molding a gaggle of brats into a finely-tuned platoon of basically-trained Marines. Their assignment is the very foundation of our Corps, for without well-trained Marines our Corps would be short lived. They'll instill in each of their charges the proud history of our Corps. They'll teach you our storied heritage, and traditions. They'll infuse each of you with our proud ethos. And when you stand at attention and receive your EGA, you'll understand the role they played. They'll be a part of you forever.

We at the VFW and Marine Corps League know you'll be successful. We're confident in you! Take each day's challenges with the knowledge that we old Marines know you're in good hands, and that our Corps has many glorious chapters yet to write. You and your fellow recruits will take your place amongst our ranks. When we see you again, you'll be a MARINE!

Semper Fi!

J. H. Hardin
Sgt, USMC
'78 – '84


Garage Sale Treasure

Matchbook Marine Corps emblem side

Matchbook Marine Corps Adverstisement side

I found this great matchbook at a garage sale.

Sgt. C. Jones
1963-1967
RVN 1966


25 Pager

Dear Sgt Grit,

We all received letters from our girlfriends in boot camp! I was dating a sweet girl, a little nuts, but fun, and I was just only 18 and in love. This zany chick has 2 dogs and they were adorable and friendly. Their names were Princess and Pogo - let me go into greater detail as I never thought that she or those dogs could get a recruit into such deep doodoo as it was a nightmare. Her name was Jackie and she was tall - her parents divorced and she had a wealthy background. I wrote her a real fast one page letter saying that I would like to hear from her and I was lonely for her smile and missed her friendship. (big big mistake) the DI always ragged on the ones who received packages and overweight letters. Some clown got cookies from grandma - and the DI made him open the tin - and made him eat all the inserts from the tin (cardboard and paper that the cookies were wrapped in) ERGO - no more cookies from Grandma!

My little lovely sent me a 25 page letter (both sides) about how she missed me and included some things that the DI had me read out loud - embarrassing the sh-t out of me. He even wanted me to go into great detail about what was between the lines - I refused and then had to do 100 sit-ups and pull-ups and deep knee bends - then when exhausted the DI told me - "night tonight Dear - you have an important engagement in the morning - you are leading the morning run Sweet Heart!" That night he made me read all 25 pages to the platoon - and he made me crawl around the squad bay barking like a dog - and made me eat one page a night - and told me write that crazy New York lunatic and tell her no more 25 page letters or he would shove it my Azs! The envelope was covered with pictures of dogs and each page of the letter were cartoon characters. This gal was very artistic and talented and landed me in a world of trouble.

The best part was after I graduated the 3 DI's made me laugh about it and all was good. The Drill Instructors could make you a world of pain - or make you laugh so hard your sides hurt. Ergo - they were only human with a tremendous undertaking to make us Marines.

Time marches on - the girl Jackie - was seen by me once after I left the Marines - amazing when you leave the Marines with a pair of B-lls - or maybe wiser ones - you are a different person.

Bruce Bender
Vietnam Era Marine
1963-1967


Special Marine Corps Birthday 240th Bash

Nov.8th-15th 2015 on Carnival Magic out of Galveston, TX. Ports of Call Cozumel, Honduras, and Belize. $100 "on board credit" per cabin!

Special Group pricing on this cruise. All prices include taxes and fees.

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Contact Pat Perry at(405) 373-4157 or pattperry@sbcglobal.net.


USMC T-shirt With Rifles On It

Hi. As I had told you in a previous email, I was upset that a Marine was asked to leave an amusement park because he had a USMC shirt on and it had rifles on it. Well, I ordered a shirt from you folks with 2 rifles on it as well as a skull to wear the day I was going to this very same park. I was asked to step aside at the entry gate of Great Adventure, 6 Flags, NJ, by the ticket taker/security guard. I asked why I was being pulled to the side and all he said was have a nice day sir and to wait here. I knew exactly what was happening and I was so excited. LOL - with that 4 security guards who are actually 6 Flags police Officers approached me and started examining my shirt. I looked at them and smiled. Then I simply warned them "if you think I'm leaving this park for wearing a USMC tee shirt, you're mistaken and I assure you I am more scary than any of your roller coasters." LMAO - They couldn't believe it and then I said "what are we doing here?" I was politely told to proceed into the park and have a great day.

These guys "got it" and I am sure they don't agree with the policy either. I then heard a woman behind me telling them that they should give me a free ticket and a waffle cone? LOL - Semper Fi!


Pogey Bait

I had to chuckle at SWAK on envelope. When I was at MCRD in 1958 my girl sent me a letter with a stick of gum in it. When S/Sgt Lawler felt the gum he called me up front and said, aw his main squeeze sent him some pogey bait, here chew it. As I started to open the envelope, he said did I say you could open the letter, I said chew the gum. I have often wondered, as the entire letter passed through my digestive system what the letter said, and it didn't taste very good.

Semper Fi
L/Cpl Cary Proffitt
'58 to '63


Crossed Or Not Crossed

Hey Sgt. Grit,

In regards to Russ Hagerthey's comment "If you have crossed rifles on your chevron's you were not in the Old Corps."

Well, try telling that to Marines like Gunny Rousseau, and many other WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Vets, including me.

I served from July 1951, through September 1961, and am a Korea Vet (August 1952 Through September 1953). Was a Buck Sergeant twice, E-4 then promoted to Sergeant E-5 on the first change over in 1958.

Old Corps is relative to when you were in versus when another person was in, e.g., Boot verses Old Salt.

Semper Fi Marines!
Old Corps, New Corps, Boots, and Old Salts.

John Vogel, Sgt. w/crossed rifles


The Company Commander

Uniform Inspection by Company Commander

This was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page on 17 September 2014. The picture shows a Marine Lance Corporal being inspected by a Marine Captain while on float. The text on the picture reads, "The way the Company Commander looks when he inspects a Lance Corporal with a ribbon stack that is bigger than his... Priceless..."

Here are a few of the comments left in reference to the picture.


J. Hunter - Let's see; Capt needs a shave, the L/Cpl he is inspecting needs to square away that p-ss cutter he is wearing; he is wearing it like he is flippin' burgers at a Steak n Shake.


D. Miller Jr. - Listen up ya bunch of land luving, pantie twisting, muffler s-cking, elbow digging, mother eyeballing, mouth breathers you know if you put your uniform on you would like a wiener dog stuck in a paper towel roll, but thats not the point. The point is we are and always will be... Marines! Semper Fi ya bunch of pit digging, powder burning Jarheads! OOO RAH


C. Cassio - that happen to me, a retread PFC, my section leader gave a similar look. He said that those ribbons better be in my SRB. He was corrected by our Company Gunny after formation.


R. Eggert - Something like this happened when we got a new Captain on board. We had a Cpl. who had ribbons up to his shoulder. Capt. asked if he should check the Cpl's SRB to verify that he was entitled to all of them. Cpl got a little nervous and said no sir. Capt asked why. Best answer yet, Cpl told him he'd find a few more that he doesn't have room for. Capt lost color and moved on. Very hard to keep from cracking up.


Read more of the comments that were left on the Sgt Grit Facebook page.


Gung Ho SeaBag

Grit,

Just reading your latest newsletter and have a few comments. Bill McDermont on Gung-Ho Lt.Col. Carlson was not just visiting the Chinese, He was embedded and fought with the Chinese Nationalist against the Chinese Communist as a China Marine who used the GUNG-ho (All Together).

R.R Lopez

I guess some things never change, the dock works and airport baggage works over the years certainly must have a lot of souvenir's. My Sea Bag and Locker Box never was found when I came back from the Pacific in 1945 along with a lot of other Marines. Same thing happened when I returned from Korea in 1952. Security both times I assume was no longer a top priority.

Semper-Fi & Gung-Ho
MGYSGT W Schroeder
XX19137
Keep the Great News Letter coming
Thanks Grit & Staff


The Chosen One

Hey, Sgt. Grit! And "OooRah!" to all my fellow Marines.

I joined our mighty Corps in July 1969, as a matter of fact, our series were one of the last to stay in the old "Quonset Huts" at MCRD. Anyway, toward the end of our training, we were moved to the newly built air conditioned barracks, which in comparison was like staying at a Hilton Hotel.

I have read a few stories of boot camp letters to a few unfortunate souls that were singled out by their DI. Well, my story does not have any DI reference, other than the fact that when you heard a command from your DI, you had better be quick to fall in!

It was a Sunday morning, and after returning from church service, we were given a couple of hours of personal time to catch up of laundry, cleaning your M14 for the next inspection, or polishing your brass. I pretty much kept my gear squared away, and decided to use the time to write letters to my sweethearts. I use the plural because I made the mistake of leaving two girlfriends back home. I preaddressed each letter to save time, and began to write each girl a heartfelt letter with all the sweet wording a young boot could muster. (As you know, we weren't officially "Marines" til after graduation.) I was thoroughly consumed with my last letter, when our DI came out of the duty hut and ordered us to put up all materials, and get ready to go out for drill. Needless to say, everyone was running around in a panic, and in the same panic mood, I put away my letter writing material, and placed each letter in the envelopes. It wasn't until two weeks later that I found out that I had placed each letter in the wrong envelopes. The two girls knew of each other, and got together to compare letters, and both gave me the ultimatum of choosing. One of the girls was more consistent in writing than the other, and chose her. Soon after, I completed my ITR training, specialty training, and off to Vietnam. Consistently writing to the one girl I had chosen. After being in country a little over 2 months, I received that one dreaded letter that every Marine dreads... the infamous "Dear John" letter from the one girl I thought would wait for me. But it just goes to show... "what goes around, comes around!"

Cpl. A.P. Cruz
USMC 1969-1971


8 Months After

I returned from Vietnam in Aug of '68. One of my, nearly empty sea bags came with me. My sea bag with all of my gear and some souvenirs that I had bought in Vietnam and Okinawa. My top stayed on my azs for the time I was stationed at Alvin Chandler NAS until I was Honorable Discharged in June of '69.

About 8 months after I got home my sea bag arrived. There was a few uniforms and Not One Of My Souvenirs was in the sea bag. I hope that the person or persons enjoyed them.

Semper Fi,
Jim Potter


Marine Corps Life, Marine Corps Style

Marines during on stage hypnosis

This was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page on 16 September 2014. The picture shows Marines during an onstage hypnotism. The text on the picture reads, "Gunny told the Plt Sgt that the SACO lecture was at 0700... The Plt Sgt wanted everyone seated by 0600... Sgt Hardknocks had you at the chow hall by 0500... Cpl Awesome had you in PT formation at 0400... LCpl Schmuckatelli (was on barracks duty) sounded Reveille at 0300... Your Plt got in from a night on the town at 0200... Out-frickin'-standing!"

Here are a few of the comments left in reference to the picture.


A. Cook - Dragging your b-tt in just in time for PT formation, Oh I miss those days!


C. Hatch - yep; we all could write our own chapter and publish a book about those moments.


K. Smith - I'm sorry, but I think that is Soooo cute! Our boys go through this, and still defend our country! Semper Fi! Men, the "average" person would have run away crying and complaining! The Marine don't play that.


G. Davidson - Ha ha! I was the SACO, so I rolled in at 0645.


L.J. Deguzman - And the busted down Pfc is in formation at 0400 going "we probably don't have to be there till 0700."


D. Avelar - To be a young Marine again...


Read more of the comments that were left on the Sgt Grit Facebook page.


Camouflaged F4 Phantoms

Did the Marines ever have camouflaged F4 Phantoms?

I just finished reading a book written by a Viet Nam veteran Marine that referred to a camouflage painted Marine F4 Phantom that flew close air support for his unit. I know the Navy did not have camo Phantoms but the Air Force did. Can't recall ever seeing a camo Marine aircraft.

Cpl J.W. Riner - 2575... M14 era


BullSh-t Detector

I could use a little help. I was at a group event for vets suffering from PTSD. All ages were there from Korean Vets to Iraq and Afghan Vets. At the meeting was a man describing himself as a Marine Nam veteran. A former chopper pilot.

His story was that as part of his officer contract, he could go off in the jungle by himself and stalk the NVA/VC. According to this man, he would go out on his own, find some sad azs VC that was sleeping on post and put a white feather on the VC's chest. It was his own form of psy/op warfare. My bullsh-t detector immediately went on high alert. I told the man I had never heard of this kind of action.

Then he pulled out a board he had made that had all his combat ribbons arranged like one would have on their chest. Surprise, surprise, surprise he had a POW ribbon. Yes, he had been captured and escaped. OK, my BS detector is going red line. The final insult to me was his Silver Star ribbon was subordinate to his Bronze Star ribbon. He didn't even know which ribbon was which. That was enough for me. I went nuclear. I told him he was full of sh-t. That he needed to immediately stop being a Marine impostor or I was going to mess up his health record. That was the end of that nonsense. I see this man in town occasionally. As far as I know, he doesn't tell that story anymore.

It amazes me how many Marine want to be's are out there.

Has anyone heard anything anymore preposterous?

Sgt. Hougher
Charlie 1/5, 1970


Reunited With Three Of My Vietnam Marine Brothers

Four Vietnam Marines Reunited

Run For The Fallen

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Last month on August 14th I had the honor and privilege to reunite with three of my Vietnam Marine brothers in Tomball, Texas. We had not seen each other in 46 years! We traveled from Connecticut, Michigan, California, and Texas. After a few tears and mighty bear hugs we started jowl jacking like it had only been a week since we last met. We laughed and told stories about the funny stuff and practical jokes we did to each other in Chu Lai in 1967 and 1968.

We laughed and lied about who saved who for four wonderful days. I gave each one of my brothers a Sgt. Grit metal sign that read, "Warning. This House Is Protected By The Good Lord And A U. S. Marine." We all participated on August 16th in the "Run For The Fallen" in Hempstead, Texas. Every military service member from Texas who gave the ultimate sacrifice was honored. Each name was read by volunteers. Governor Perry gave permission for the flags in the town square to be flown at half-mast while the names were being read.

The "Run For the Fallen" is the most patriotic, reverent, and uplifting event I have ever seen. I give many thanks and props to "Operation Military Embrace", operationmilitaryembrace.com, a 501C3 organization that put the event together for the fifth year in a row with help from many sponsors and the great city of Hempstead. OME gives 100% of every donated dollar to wounded service members and their families. Everyone working for OME is a volunteer and they work to honor our service members and to give them and their families a hand up in their time of need.

Thank you Sgt. Grit for all that you do for our military service members.

Semper Fi,
SSgt "Tee" Turner
USMC 1965-1971
RVN Nov. '67 - Nov. '68


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #1)

I returned to the hotel and laid down for a while. I skipped dinner. I called the front desk and asked if there might be a TV available for the evening. They said there was but there would be a charge for it. Then they said there would not be a charge because I had been there for three nights. It arrived as before and was set up. I recall watching parts of a roller derby show and Frank Sinatra on another channel. I didn't think much of either of them. I took a shower and went to sleep. I awoke at the usual time, about 5:00 AM. I laid there and mulled over my plans for the day. I got up and did a few exercises for the first time in three weeks. I took a shower and shaved and went to the dining room for a brunch. I returned to the room and rested for a few minutes. Then I got up and put on my Dress Blues and headed for Earlham to surprise 'the love of my life'. I timed it right and passed through the gate at exactly 1:00. I drove to her housing unit (I cannot for the life of me recall the name of that building), parked the car and walked into the lounge. There must have been about 50 people there. I did not see Mary among them. I went up to the desk and asked a young lady if she would do me a favor. She said "Gladly. What would you like?" I said "Please do not tell her who is here - but call Room #8 and tell Mary she is wanted in the lounge." She picked up the phone and did just that. Fortunately, Mary was in the room. She answered and said "I'll be right down." The room was rather quiet for one with so many people in it. I watched the place where she would enter. All of a sudden she was there. She spotted me instantly and pressed her hands over her mouth to keep from screaming out loud. She ran to me and wrapped her arms around my neck. I wrapped my arms around her and we had another of those lovely kisses - but not as long as yesterday. As if we had been apart for ages she said "Oh, it's so good to see you! What a surprise! How long can you stay?" I told her "We have 'til 5:00, when visiting hours are over."

Everybody in the lounge, it seemed, had their eyes on us. I asked her "Would you like to go into Richmond?" She said "Can we?" I told her to ask the girl at the desk. She did. Her file was checked and she was told "If this is Sgt. Freas, yes, you can leave the campus - but make sure you are back by 5:00." As usual, she was dressed to the nines. She looked like a million dollars. She said "Let me get my purse - and my I.D. - and change my shoes. I'll be right back." She was back in a couple of minutes and we headed for the gate. The guard asked for her I.D. and checked it against his file. He did not ask for mine. He said "I checked his a few minutes ago. "I am sure he is your escort. Have fun."

We went down to the park and walked around the lake. Then we went to a soda shop for a huge milkshake which we shared. We took our time. Everyone was looking at us. And the 'blues' were hot. We returned to the campus and drove slowly all over the place. We returned to her housing unit just before 5:00, went inside, held hands for a few minutes, kissed and exchanged 'I love yous' and I left her again.

'til next week. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


But It Didn't Happen

Noted the editorial note about the squid recruits being across the creek at MCRD SD in the sixties... might point out that between the grinder and that channel of water is one headquarters building, and a whole bunch of lawn and some officer quarters... if y'all saw squidlets, you had to have been (for some reason...?) down around the automotive hobby shop or on a run dog leg at the west end of the Lindbergh Field runway (airport long since extended)... a common run went along the airfield fence, left at the end, out to the chained/padlocked chain link fencing gate at Harbor Drive, U-turn, and back, etc. At the point, there was only a chain link fence separating MCRD, and NTC (Naval Training Center)... and you might see 'companies' of squidlets marching with their dummy rifles (somewhat like those used by high school marching bands/flag girls etc... looked like M1903 Springfields)... This area also had an old concrete loading dock, and circa 1964-1965, was where Facility Maintenance would dump concrete rubble. Said rubble was part of the plan of the day for Correctional Custody Platoon, as they would reduce the concrete (and the loading dock) back into aggregate... with sledgehammers. Once in a while, the DI's from CC would apprehend a Navy recruit who had made it over the fence, probably waiting for darkness to get further AWOL. This poor soul would be invited to join the Marine recruits... knew of one who was 'retained' in CC for a couple of days, with the knowledge and connivance of his 'Company Commander'... probably a Chief Petty Officer, who had spent some time in 'gator freighters' (amphibious shipping... APAs, LSTs, etc.) and knew about Marines... the recruit reportedly was very happy to return to NTC when his Company Commander came to get him... For the two years that I know of, following the inception of CC and (across the street, Motivation), the recidivism rate was 0... sentence was three days, no marks in the SRB... and nobody wanted seconds... ever... and there was no maltreatment (hitting, slapping, punching, kicking, etc... just some real professionals... intensely demanding... one of them was responsible for introducing She Who Must Be Obeyed to me... have long since forgiven him...).

Earlier had commented ('the vision thing') about one of our flankers finding a NVA Bn cache of packs (Hastings, July of '66)... have forgotten the LCPL's name, but he recently portrayed a DA in a TV drama... (gonna have to e-mail his squad leader... "Sprinks"... or Eddie Sinkfield... to overcome that brain fart... and if that label for flatus offends you... you're definitely on the wrong website...)... anyway, having found the cooking gear and moved on until told to hold up by the CP group, we were doing the usual... standing around, waiting, watching... it was at least just hot, if shady, when the LCPL said "hey, SSGT D... come look at this"... he had found a mound of packs, covered with recently cut vegetation... upon further exploration of the area, we found four or five more such mounds... all new gear. This pretty much assured that we had gone as far as we were going that day, as this find had to be exploited for intel. I recall that we took two or three fart sacks (mattress covers) full of documents, papers, etc. out of those piles... never did know where the fart sacks came from, but they were flown to Division G-2 for analysis. Most packs had a pair of new 'Ho Chi Minh' sandals (made from car or truck tires and inner tubes... like 'flip flops', and brand new blue sweat shirts, that had oval labels, printed in English, that read "Made In Hanoi"... uniform items, letters, pictures, small bundles of ammo wrapped in paper and tied with twine, with Chinese characters, caps similar to later USMC boonie hats, etc. We were surprised to find some of the pictures were of NVA soldiers with their girlfriends... a strip of four pictures... as if they had put $.50 in a Greyhound bus station photo booth. Since all we had known since coming ashore on this and other operations was enervating heat/humidity we were really puzzled at the sweatshirts... but a couple of days later, we were considerably higher on that mountain... and understood maybe why they had included those in their kit. Officer map cases (my assumption) had fountain pens and colored pencils... two colours, one at each end, stamped in English 'made in Hanoi" (I still have a couple... along with a map case, some ammo, a machete, and a haversack that I carried instead of our M1941 issue pack on later operations... good design, simple, plenty capacity, and light...) The stuff all had a faint odor of NVA rations... which, from best guess, was a mixture of rice, millet, and garlic powder...

On the subject of Lucky Strike Green... like those who are absolutely now convinced, having told the same story for forty plus years about receiving 1943 C-rations... I know that by now, in your heart of hearts, that you believe it... but it didn't happen. (trust me... or do the research on your own... the MCI, Meal, Combat, Individual, did not exist until the 1960s... nor did the four-pack of Luckies with green ink exist... older C-rats, circa 1950's, had an entire pack of cigarettes... not a four pack and they were mostly white with the circular logo BT,DT). There was an advertising slogan in the early 1940's about "Lucky Strike Green has gone to war"... the green ink, for some reason, was critical to the war effort... and Lucky Strike went from green to white packaging. I did once see some of the WWII green ink... FLSG-B at Dong Ha and Quang Tri in 1969 had an XO who was generally suspected of being senile, or close to it... among other things, he had a mannerism when smoking that was a real affectation... and he had little to do... but one morning at the daily staff meeting he reported that the previous day he had been at what passed for a PX, and that there was no soap (Dial, Irish Spring, whatever) there for the troops to buy!... since this sorta coincided with the 3rd Mar Div units pulling out and retrograding up to Okinawa... (4th Marines had just come off Mutter's Ridge, as I recall)... we kinda had bigger fish to fry. However, the next morning Captain Tommy Thompson, a Mustang supply officer, came to the staff meeting with a case of salt-water soap... (WWII vintage)... that had Lucky Strike Green triangles on all eight corners... and told the Lt Col he had that problem handled. It was a big joke for everybody but the XO... who didn't get it. For those who have never had to shower with salt-water soap... be thankful. I suspect that in today's modern Navy, that 'water hours' and 'salt-water showers' are a thing of the past... or as we used to joke "Navy shower? can of Right Guard and clean skivvies..."

Ddick


Lost And Found

Looking for anyone who remembers serving with 84 year old Sgt Byron Coley. Byron doesn't own a computer. He is the step father to a friend of mine. Any messages for him can be sent to me at: usmc7280[at]yahoo.com, and I will forward them to his stepdaughter.

Cards or letters can be sent to:
Byron Coley
953 Long Pond Rd
Long Pond Twp., ME 04945


Short Rounds

To answer Dan Campbell's question on the spelling of Presley O'Bannon's last name as O'Banion, my half-brother is a direct descendent of Presley O'Bannon and during his genealogy research found that was just a variation of the spelling, especially back during that era. The correct spelling is indeed O'Bannon...

Julian Etheridge


Sgt Grit,

The stories that come with my Marine magazine are very funny, touching and sentimental it always takes me back to (boot camp 1967, plt 1041).

Keep up the great job, I will keep ordering and passing your magazine to other Marines who do not know about you. God Bless Semper Fi...

Pfc A.R. Hernandez
Plt 1041 Honor Man

Thank you Gunny Padilla, Staff Sgt Warner, Sgt Shearer...


In response to this week's newsletter, OUTSTANDING!

SEMPER FI


"You have to poke 'em and stroke 'em" LtCol Joe Wilson, CO 4/14, on leadership, during the battalion MCCRES at Fort Pickett, VA, July 1983, as told to Maj Joe Kerke, CO K-4/14.

SEMPER FIDELIS.


Murphy,

If you are wanting to "blow smoke" up someone's azs. This is not the place. These guys can spot a phony a mile away.

Dave G.
B/1/9
May '67-June '68


Thank you Olivia, and to all the Sgt. Grit Staff. In my 25 years or so fo doing business with "The Gritster" he and his staff have always made things right. Outstanding job today as yesterday.

Outstanding Marine!

OOH-RAH

Pvt. James Hattabaugh
Ammo Co - 3rd Marine Amphibious Force
3rd Mar Div - Quang Nam, Province - I-Corps
1967-68


Sgt. Grit,

Just finished reading this week's newsletter and would like to comment on your article about the Navy boot camp across the fence from the Marine boot camp in San Diego. I was in platoon 2039, June thru August 1966. Our DI would march us to the fence on Sunday and while all the Navy boots were outside milling around and smoking, he would call us to attention and tell us to sing the Marine Corps him. We would all yell at the top of our lungs "him, him, f--k him"

Ed Gruener, SSgt


Quotes

"Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they've made a difference. The Marines don't have that problem."
--President Ronald Reagan


"Thus after successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp and fashioned him at will, the supreme power then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a network of small, complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate to rise above the crowd, The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent and guided: men are seldom forced by it to act, but are constantly restrained from acting. Such power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervates, extinguishes and stupefies a people, till each nation is reduced to nothing better than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd."
--Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (Vol. II, Book 4, Chapter 6)


"I want you boys to hurry up and whip these Germans so we can get out to the Pacific to kick the sh-t out of those purple-p-ssing Japanese, before the godd-mned Marines get all the credit!"
--LtGen George Patton, USA, 1945


"And once by God, I was a Marine!"
--Actor Lee Marvin, Circa, 1967, about serving in WW II


"If you were not there, you could not understand. If you were there, it is impossible to explain."
--Unknown


"Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a Freeman, contending for liberty on his own ground, is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth."
--George Washington, 1776


"The propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained."
--George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789


"I am convinced there is no smarter, handier or more adaptable body of troops (U.S. Marines) in the world…Always spick and span, ready at an instant's notice for duty, the nation owes them a great debt."
--American novelist Winston Churchill, 1917


"Mother Green!"

"Pvt sh-t stain, if u don't get squared away, I'm gonna recycle your azz back to the block, and you'll be suckin' fartz outta hospital sheets for a livin."

"Private, you got a Maggie's Drawers."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 18 SEP 2014

In this issue:
• Sealed With A Kiss
• Accept And Embrace Change
• Gung Ho And Lichtenstein Marines

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Sgt Grit,

While reading your most recent newsletter (3/4 August), I was pleasantly surprised to see that you now stock a shirt representing 1st Bn, 23rd Marines. I'm also pleased because, for the many years that I have been reading your newsletters (going back to the first edition) this is the first time that I've seen a shirt for reservists, especially since it is my old unit.

When I joined the Corpus Christi, Texas, unit back in August of 1969, after coming off active duty, it was two recon companies: C and D, 4th Recon Bn. (I'm proud to have been the CO of Delta Company.) After a couple of years we were re-designated as C/1/23, and I was the second CO to serve the unit under that designation. (The first was Jack Fraim, who was senior to me, so I was XO/1st Platoon Commander. He later moved to Florida, and I lost contact with him.) Thanks for recognizing the efforts of the Corps' reservists.

Semper Fi!

Tom Downey
Once a captain, USMCR; always a Marine.

Get the mentioned unit t-shirt at:

1st Battalion 23rd Marines T-shirt

1st Battalion 23rd Marines T-shirt


Sealed With A Kiss

Don,

Just read a posting by Sgt. Rigiero on his experience with YUK, and would like to extend a similar laugh.

When in boot, Parris Island, my girlfriend kept sending me letters with S.W.A.K. on the back [sealed with a kiss]. One of the junior D.I.'s, who by the way took an instant dislike of me, would lay the letter on the deck, and make me do 20-30 push-ups, depending on his irritability with me at the time,[LOL] and direct me to kiss the letter each time, and say "I open this with a kiss darlin'..." needless to say I advised my girlfriend to stop putting it on the letters, I had enough on my plate without opening new doors of torment from an overzealous D.I.

L/Cpl Edwin O'Keefe
'61-'64


Halloween T-shirt Special


Accept And Embrace Change

Sgt. Grit,

I would like to reply to J. Wise's letter published in the September 10, 2014 newsletter.

I never had the professional honor of wearing anything but GySgt chevrons, but I'm well aware that the officer ranks are deeply embedded in political correctness. No Marine officer is appointed Commandant unless he adheres to a particular political theory. Accordingly, I believe that every Commandant our illustrious "Corps" has had has tried to "make his mark" on the Marine Corps. Many of the "changes" the Marine Corps has experienced has been for that very reason. Any Marine officer who reaches that pinnacle has the right to "make his mark". Live with it.

On the other hand, many of the "changes" have been for a variety of other reasons - safety, security, modernization, cost, uniformity, discipline, ease of care, and many other reasons too numerous to mention. Marines once used muzzle-loaded weapons. Marines once used swords. Our beloved "Corps" has, by the grace of God, adopted battle techniques and weapons that reflect what has become necessary to defeat the enemies of this great nation. Time and again, Marines have risen to the occasion, distinguished themselves, and defeated those enemies or at least given them pause to reflect on who exactly they were fighting. The discipline, dedication, and esprit-de-corps as well as the heroism and love of country is alive and well in today's Marines.

Recently, I had the opportunity to "upgrade" my cell phone. My carrier offered me a wide variety of choices. Although, being retired, I really didn't need a "smart phone", that's exactly what I chose. Several weeks of trial and error were necessary before I fully understood the technology to be able to use the "smart phone" effectively. I'm glad I made the choice. I'm enjoying my new-found connection with the world. And, No, I'm not addicted to a machine.

I guess what I'm really trying to say is - Who cares why these "changes" have come about. What's important is that our beloved Marine Corps' ethos, mission, and brotherhood haven't changed, and never will. We must either accept and embrace "change" or go the way of all extinct species. Most of the time, "change" is for the better. OH - nostalgia - it's not broke, don't fix it. History and studying history is important, but let's not get so tied up with history and nostalgia that we forget that we must do what we have to do to insure the continuation of this great nation.

Present day Marines are well equipped both mentally, physically to do exactly that. Young people accept "change". So should us older folks.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


The Black Rifle

The Black Rifle

Sgt Grit,

Several stories have been posted recently about the Stoner rifles. Here's a little more info:

Eugene Stoner developed this rifle, and it had several variations. Most notably, the M16. He was the father of the M16. To fully understand the development and Vietnam problems with the M16, read the book "The Black Rifle", it's very informative. I met him once while working for Colt Firearms in the early 90's. He was also a WWII USMC Veteran.

Bill Guntor
USMC '66 - '69
RVN '67 - '69
1/1

Get a hardcover copy at "The Black Rifle".


Gung Ho And Lichtenstein Marines

Sgt.Grit,

Two comments please:

"Gung Ho", I read the book.

"Carlson's Raid, The Daring Marine Assault on Makin" by George W. Smith.

The book reports that Major Carlson visited with the Chinese Communist troops in the late 1930's in order to update the US Military. They were at that time, basically a guerrilla outfit. The book says (not me saying) that the battle cry of the Chicoms was GUNG HO, which translated into "All together".

Making bets, playing cards with the S.D.I... Possibly in the Lichtenstein Marines...

Bill Mc Dermott
180xxxx


Shaking My Head

Don't know why, but in the past month I've met two that claimed to be Marines, but just left me shaking my head.

The first was at the local rifle range. Don't remember how the conversation went that way, but he claimed to have gone to boot camp at "Camp Pendleton", had no idea what MCRD is, and claimed to have had a female drill instructor... at Camp Pendleton. Claimed to have gone to boot camp around 1994. I just packed up and left, and as I was pulling away, he was saying, "I know you don't believe me, but that's the honest truth." Odd experience, to say the least.

The second was down around Roswell, New Mexico. Saw a car with Marine stickers and asked who owned it. Guy spoke up, I asked when he was in the Marines and he answered, "a long time ago". I guess he had a guilty conscience, because it wasn't five minutes before he admitted he had never been in the Corps, he was an associate member of a Marine Corps motorcycle club. At least he was honest.

Maybe it was just my turn.

Earl Needham
Clovis, New Mexico USA

BTW, I was shooting a Winchester Model 70 in 7mm STW.


239th USMC Birthday Items


Betting With DI

Sgt. Grit,

After reading the post by Cpl Murphy regarding betting his S/DI at the range on Qual. day and playing card's while in Boot Camp, watching his D.I. crying after the Platoon screwed up sounds like a little B.S. thrown in... just saying.

Jim Scott Cpl.
'59-'65


I don't believe that a recruit made a bet with a drill instructor, I don't believe the recruit played poker with him either. I also don't believe a Marine unit went without food for 5 weeks. I call bulls--t...

Gene


Sgt Grit,

I re-read the post again and I am now convinced the guy is a fake. He called himself a Sea going bellhop. What Marine refers to himself by that moniker? Non-Marines and army and civilians call us that, but when is the last time you ever heard a Marine call himself that? I never have. Then he uses a lot of our phrases or buzzwords but used them with quotation marks to indicate that he knows the difference between several of them like hat and cover and pants and trousers. We all know those terms, he does not have to use quotation marks to prove to qualify them, we all know what he means to say. Personally I think he is an on-line lurker and studies our history and is just bullsh-tting us by stealing other Marines stories.

Don Shipley, the Navy SEAL who outs phony seals calls them lurkers. They troll the military websites and study the different branch's history and then cultivate their own image. I think that's what this guy did. I would have believed him though until he mentioned the bet with his DI and then playing cards with him? Naaaa Ain't no DI that ever walked this earth would allow that and if this guy was really a Marine he would know that! Thanks for letting me ramble Don!

Semper Fi
Mike


Gary Zanzalari has the same problem I have with a story in a previous Newsletter by a "marine" (lower case on purpose) claiming far too many liberties with his Drill Instructors. The overuse of recognized slang and nicknames made it glaringly obvious to this Marine that we were reading "The Life and Times of a Wanna-be". At first I questioned Sgt.Grit for including this story in the Newsletter, but then it dawned on me that it may have been for the purposes of giving real Marines a shot at this imposter by calling him out. Let it be said. Let it be done. He IS a Poser and NOT a Marine.

David B. McClellan
Viet Nam Combat Veteran
1969-1970
Former LCpl, Forever Marine.


Sgt Grit,

Sorry I am making a big deal about this, but if this clown is a poser it p-sses me off to no end! And then he talks about being a Corporal of Marines but being on point with "his radioman" and then his "sarge" this and sarge that. Was he in the Marines or the army? I don't know for sure, but his story just sounds like he read the stories of several Marines on this newsletter over the years and cultivated his own "history", and thought he could buffalo us into thinking he is one of us, but all he did was insult our intelligence.

Semper Fi Sgt Grit, this will be my last gripe on this issue!

Mike Kunkel
A real Corporal of Marines
3/8 Lima company, Weapons Platoon
0331
1981 to 1985


Bare Azs Minimum

Regarding the seabags that we left behind in Okinawa... I was with "F" Co 2nd Bn, 3rd Marines... we were leaving Camp Schwab aboard ships that took us to the P.I. for some jungle training. A brief sojourn in Thailand and in April 1965 we landed at DaNang. I left RVN in December 1965 and returned to Okinawa where someone was to bring us our left behind gear. I remember this very clearly I was handed my almost empty seabag it only contained one pair of dress shoes, no other article of clothing, a few days later we boarded a C-130 that touched down in Guam and again in Hawaii, where I was able to buy a pair of jeans and tennis shoes. Finally we arrived at El Toro about 8 am on 24 December. I was still wearing VN mud on my boots and clothing and had lost my cover as we boarded the aircraft in DaNang. We went thru the process getting paid etc. As I and a few others were on our way to the mess hall a young butter bar came rolling along in vehicle and commenced to give me a hassle regarding my lost cover. I left El Toro wearing the jeans tennis shoes and a liberated field jacket... One month later I reported back to Camp Pendleton wearing a business suit that I had sent home from Hong Kong and my dress shoes. I still had my VN jungle utilities that had been washed and patched. I was issued a bare asz minimum clothing, being that I only had one year left to do... but I wonder who got my stuff!

R.R. Lopez
Call sign: Double R


Marine Ink Of The Week

Submitted by V. Juarez

It is almost done, just needs to be touched up.

USMC


Best-Worst

'73-'74 TAD out of 1st Radio Bn FMF, KMCAS, HI to Shu Lin Kuo AB, Taiwan for six heavenly months. Houseboys to clean rooms (boots left outside your two man room - shined), one dollar for a haircut, shampoo, and shoulder massage (OH, YEAH - best groomed Marines in the Corps), and the best small chow hall in the Air Force (at least every two years, which is how often they would let them win it.) Three entrees every night, fresh salads, surf and turf (steak and lobster) once a week. I know that the grammar is lacking (no verbs), but I'm still drooling thinking about it (and that doesn't count the hammers downtown (sorry, brothers, if you haven't already told your wife about them, but 40 years oughta' buy you some forgiveness).

'74-'75 Worst chow hall - Homestead AFB - Food out of vacuum cans and roaches coming out of the tea dispensers (how did they get them in those same plastic bags that milk was dispensed from?)

Semper Fi,
George M. Button
MSgt USMC (ret)


Beautiful Bridges Where Marines Once Fought

The Banpo Bridge Moonlight Fountain, Seoul, South Korea

The Banpo Bridge Moonlight Fountain, Seoul, South Korea.

The Dragon Bridge, DaNang, Vietnam

The Dragon Bridge, DaNang, Vietnam.


Head Up Azz

To Sgt. J. Davis in regards to Uoo Garr... I have heard many variations to the story of where OOO-RAH came from including that it was from the Marine Raiders from WWII and their rides on subs. But I must say that the ARMY (Ain't Ready to be Marines Yet) is famous for their acronyms and they say WHO-AH which is the pronunciation of H-U-A another acronym for Head Up Azz (though some would say it means heard understood and acknowledged)...

Semper Fi to all my brothers and sisters


A Saddle

I admired the subject cover during all of WWII, as discussed in your 11 September News Letter.

After graduation from MCRD, PI, in December 1953, I strived to achieve the same look for my cover. This was finally accomplished by utilizing the proper head size frame, w/brim, adding a cover one size smaller, then a grommet one size larger.

The appearance of the result was occasionally referred to as a saddle. I remember after serving in the 2nd Division, reporting in to the CO of the Marine Detachment at Great Lakes for Electronics School, his comment was "Did you wear that cover in, or did you ride it?"

I would like to submit an additional comment... If your chevrons had crossed rifles, you were not in the Old Corps...

Best regards
Russ Hagerthey
142xxxx


Hi Sergeant Russel

I read Sgt Frank Rigiero's story about his girlfriend writing "YNK" (for "You'll Never Know" by Sinatra) on the outside of his letters while in Boot camp.

This reminded me of my own ordeal at the hands of Drill Instructor Sgt. Russell, Parris Island, circa 1980. I was/still am, an Irish Jersey boy with a ton of Jersey attitude. I quickly learned to despise Sgt. Russell and he had no great love for me either! I would write letters to my girlfriend back home in "Joisey" complaining about, cursing and praying for the occurrence of violent events that would rid my life of Sgt. Russell.

One evening, mail call was sounded by Sgt. Russell, and my name was called, I jumped up, ran to the quarter deck and just as I was about to clap the letter in my hands, Sgt. Russell looks at the back of the envelope where my dear sweet misguided girlfriend had written across the flap "Hi Sergeant Russel" in flowery print complete with hearts and smiley faces... to this day, I don't know what was worse, the PT I had to endure, or the lecture from that 6'5" red headed Alabama, backwoods redneck Sergeant about writing home about him and her misspelling of his name!

Needless to say, after I recovered from the verbal and physical assault, I Immediately scratched out a short, terse note to my girlfriend explaining what happened to me... and what would happen to her if she EVER wrote ANYTHING on the outside of the envelopes other than my name, address and the return address!

L/Cpl. Matt Penny
PLT 2047 - 1980


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #9, #4)

He scribbled something on a 3x5 card. He asked Mary "Do you have a car?" She replied "No, but my fiance does." (That was the very first time she had called me her fiance. It was quite appropriate, I guess, because we had been talking of marriage.) He called for a volunteer to show Mary to her housing unit and gave the girl the card. We went out to my car and proceeded as directed by this young lady. She commented "This is a really nice car." It was the 1950 Buick that I had purchased in April. We got to the building where Mary was to reside while at Earlham. I got her lockerbox from the trunk and the two girls carried all of her other items. We went into the lounge and over to a desk where a woman was sitting. She was the House Mother and welcomed Mary to the house. The girl that had led us over there gave the H.M. the 3x5 card. She glanced at it and said loudly "Is there anyone here from Room #8?" One girl jumped up and came over to the desk. The H.M. said "Carolee, this is Mary. She will be your roommate." Carolee asked Mary "Where are you from?" Mary replied "I am from New Jersey." Carolee said "No kidding - where abouts in New Jersey?" Mary replied "Mt. Holly." And Carolee came back with "I don't believe it. I'm from Moorestown." Mary was thrilled and said "Well, I guess we shall renew the old football rivalry?" (For more than 25 years the teams from these two towns - only 8 miles apart - had battled on Thanksgiving Day.) Carolee got a rubber tired cart and I lifted Mary's lockerbox onto it. She said "I'll take you down to our room." Mary looked a bit puzzled and asked "Will this take long?" There was only a few minutes before I would have to be out of there. Carolee replied "Only 5 or 10." When Mary and I first entered the lounge there were about 10 to 12 girls there but all of a sudden there must have been 40 or more. I was told that the word had spread in the dining hall that there was a Marine in the lounge.

Mary returned and we had less than 10 minutes to go. We were holding hands and soon she wrapped her arms around my neck. I pulled her up close and wrapped my arms around her. We kissed - and kissed - and kissed some more - and when I thought it was time to quit - she put one hand behind my head - and pulled me closer for more. There was dead silence in the lounge. This must have been the longest kiss of all time. When it was over someone in the crowd said "You shouldn't be going to college; you should be heading for the altar!" We looked at each other. We each said to the other "I love you." And I left. When I reached the car I looked back. Mary was standing on the front stoop. We waved to each other. I headed for the gate with a little moisture in my eyes. The guard just waved me on through. I returned to the hotel. I planned to get a good night's sleep, get up early, and drive the whole way home on Sunday. I had thought I would be home before dark. But I had an idea. I called Earlham and asked what the visiting hours were on Sunday. They told me "After 10:00 for family members and then 1:00 to 5:00 for others."

I hatched a plan that I would put in place tomorrow.

'til next week. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Triggers

Nah... not those things you gently squeeze, nor more than one of Roy Roger's horse, but the things that stir the memory... (or, in the case of Marines, that might be more like stirring a cesspool?). I was mowing our yard yesterday... about half an acre, mostly Fescue (the Lawn Ranger takes care of fertilizer and 'pre-emergent' stuff for me... more about the Ranger further on...) Not being the sharpest knife in the box of light bulbs, I had elected (with some prodding from She Who Must Be Obeyed... but no batteries in the prod... this time...) to start this project around 10:30. This being Tennessee... and August... it was a tad on the warmish side. Also, being fiscally conservative (cheap), and bull-headed (according to SWMBO), I have carried out this domestic policing of the area for going on ten years with a twenty-one inch Toro rotary mower... although self-propelled, in these parts, it is type-identified as "a push mower". (go figure). Being reluctant to give up the garage space for a riding mower, so long as I can walk, and being too slow to control a 'zero-turn' mower, it works for me (at seventy-five...)

There is a "uniform of the day" for mowing... that being bilious green grass-stained tennie runners, black swim trunks, a white skivvie shirt (v-neck... they're hard to find...) and the official "Mowing Cover"... the latter looking much like an OD boonie hat, trimmed in white NACL2 until SWMBO captures it for enhanced interrogation techniques in her secret room (I sometimes hear liquid sounds and Thumpa-Thumpa-Thumpa noises coming from in there... and I don't go in there if there are any clean skivvies in my dresser drawer)... Thus properly attired, the mowing commenced, and as might be expected, the sweat began to roll... and I was soon soggy. Having been an early participant in the SEA war games, in the day, we had yet to adopt the later ubiquitous green towel around the neck, and as my mission reached the half-way point, I decided to take a break ('take ten... expect five... get three... offa yer azs and on yer feet... saddle up... move out") and went into the garage, which, while not air-conditioned, is about half buried, and remains cool... and grabbed one of those modern miracles, a plastic bottle of chilled water, out of the man cave refrigerator. At that point, the sweat saturated tee-shirt coolly clung to my back... feeling EXACTLY like a sweat-soaked nylon rip-stop medium regular utility jacket!... A mixed perception... blessed coolness, but slippery, almost slimy, clinging... for an instant there, I could have been somewhere outside of Tam Ky... or just arrived at The Rockpile... or?... Tis' said that smell is the strongest of memory triggers... could be... but that wet fabric was a contendah for a close second.

In re the Lawn Ranger... built the retirement home while commuting from CA (developer/contractor was a Huey crew chief in the Air Cav for TET), had seen the Lawn Ranger's trucks around the area, liked the sense of humor, wrote the phone number down. When I moved the wife and mother-in-law into the house, I gave her the phone number, told her to call the guy and get the skinny on the lawn service deal. When back in CA, called the wife, asked if she had contacted the Lawn Ranger... she said she had called the number, but got a voice mail saying they'd be gone for a week, as he had gone to Camp Pendleton to meet their two sons returning from Iraq... (2004)... told her to call back and leave the message that he had the job... Wally's company has been coming up this hill for ten years now... one of the sons works for the company, the other went on to Emory, and was commissioned as a Lt. a couple years back... got some of the better looking grass on our hill... (of course... all I do is mow it...)

Ddick


Short Rounds

Good Morning, just want to say 'Thank You'. I understand Sgt Grit has provided a shipment of surprises to one of my Platoon 331 recruits from 1959 -- a retired Marine MGySgt Bob Daniels. I was their DI at PI 55 years ago & we are having a reunion at MCB Quantico -- Sept. 24-27, 2014. So, thanks again Marine & Semper Fi.

Frank C. Foster
Capt USMC Ret.


Sgt Grit,

Just wanted you to know that I re-upped, renewed my subscription to your OUTSTANDING magazine, the gear is great, I also pass along a suggested Addition to your USMC book selection, I just finished "Red Blood Black Sand" by Chuck Tatum, The true story of from boot camp to Iwo Jima. Well worth reading and adding to your book list.

Semper Fi
Schrader, Gerard C
Sgt 2003XXX USMC

Note: Chuck was a great guy and Marine. When I would call him he would answer the phone "Pvt Tatum speaking". He also was a consultant on the movie Flags Of Our Fathers. He was in the machine gun team when Basilone was killed. Chuck passed this year. God Bless you Chuck, Semper Fi.

Sgt Grit


Drop your C--k and grab your socks it's another glorious day in the Marine Corps.

Semper Fi
Charles (SGT) Hightower '64-'67


LtCol Bull Fisher was CO of 2/4 when it left Hawaii to go to VN in 1965 and remained CO for some time in VN.


I was talking to a Marine customer the other day. He mentioned at MCRD San Diego in the 60's the navy had a boot camp across the fence. They got a lot of time off and would sit on the porch steps and wave, yell, and just harass Marine platoons as we did our thing.

Sgt Grit


Quotes

He Who Sheds Blood

"Whoever does not have the stomach for this fight, let him depart. Give him money to speed his departure, since we wish not to die in that man's company. Whoever lives past today and comes home safely will rouse himself every year on this day, show his neighbor his scars, and tell embellished stories of all their great feats of battle. These stories he will teach his son and from this day until the end of the world we shall be remembered. We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for whoever has shed blood with me shall be my brother. And those men afraid to go will think themselves lesser men as they hear of how we fought and died together."


"All that is really great and inspiring, is created by the individual who can labor in freedom."
--Albert Einstein


"Cowardice asks the question: is it safe?
Expediency asks the question: is it politic?
Vanity asks the question: is it popular?
But conscience asks the question: is it right?
And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular; but one must take it because it is right."

"We should never forget that everything Adolph Hitler did in Germany was 'legal' and everything the Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was 'illegal'."
--Martin Luther King


"Marines have a cynical approach to war. They believe in three things; liberty, payday and that when two Marines are together in a fight, one is being wasted. Being a minority group militarily, they are proud and sensitive in their dealings with other military organizations. A Marine's concept of a perfect battle is to have other Marines on the right and left flanks, Marine aircraft overhead and Marine artillery and naval gunfire backing them up."
--War correspondent Ernie Pyle, killed on Ie Shima, Ryukyu Archipelago, 1945


"We're not accustomed to occupying defensive positions. It's destructive to morale."
--LtGen H. M. "Howlin' Mad" Smith, Iwo Jima, 1945, quoted to Walter Karig


"Liberty is meaningless if it is only the liberty to agree with those in power."
--Ludwig von Mises


"Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear."
--Ambrose Redman


"George Washington was one of the few men in all of human history who was not carried away by power."
--Robert Frost, Poet


"There is a rank due to the United States, among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war."
--George Washington, Fifth Annual Message, 1793


"Dress right... wait for it... DRESS! Too SLOW! Get back!"

"Currently Unassigned."

"I've never heard a funnier phrase than "2nd Fumble, Stumble, Stagger and Gag."

"Lean back... dig 'em in... heels, heels, heels!"

God Bless the Marine Corps,
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 18 SEP 2014

In this issue:
• Sealed With A Kiss
• Accept And Embrace Change
• Gung Ho And Lichtenstein Marines

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Sgt Grit,

While reading your most recent newsletter (3/4 August), I was pleasantly surprised to see that you now stock a shirt representing 1st Bn, 23rd Marines. I'm also pleased because, for the many years that I have been reading your newsletters (going back to the first edition) this is the first time that I've seen a shirt for reservists, especially since it is my old unit.

When I joined the Corpus Christi, Texas, unit back in August of 1969, after coming off active duty, it was two recon companies: C and D, 4th Recon Bn. (I'm proud to have been the CO of Delta Company.) After a couple of years we were re-designated as C/1/23, and I was the second CO to serve the unit under that designation. (The first was Jack Fraim, who was senior to me, so I was XO/1st Platoon Commander. He later moved to Florida, and I lost contact with him.) Thanks for recognizing the efforts of the Corps' reservists.

Semper Fi!

Tom Downey
Once a captain, USMCR; always a Marine.

Get the mentioned unit t-shirt at:

1st Battalion 23rd Marines T-shirt


Sealed With A Kiss

Don,

Just read a posting by Sgt. Rigiero on his experience with YUK, and would like to extend a similar laugh.

When in boot, Parris Island, my girlfriend kept sending me letters with S.W.A.K. on the back [sealed with a kiss]. One of the junior D.I.'s, who by the way took an instant dislike of me, would lay the letter on the deck, and make me do 20-30 push-ups, depending on his irritability with me at the time,[LOL] and direct me to kiss the letter each time, and say "I open this with a kiss darlin'..." needless to say I advised my girlfriend to stop putting it on the letters, I had enough on my plate without opening new doors of torment from an overzealous D.I.

L/Cpl Edwin O'Keefe
'61-'64


Accept And Embrace Change

Sgt. Grit,

I would like to reply to J. Wise's letter published in the September 10, 2014 newsletter.

I never had the professional honor of wearing anything but GySgt chevrons, but I'm well aware that the officer ranks are deeply embedded in political correctness. No Marine officer is appointed Commandant unless he adheres to a particular political theory. Accordingly, I believe that every Commandant our illustrious "Corps" has had has tried to "make his mark" on the Marine Corps. Many of the "changes" the Marine Corps has experienced has been for that very reason. Any Marine officer who reaches that pinnacle has the right to "make his mark". Live with it.

On the other hand, many of the "changes" have been for a variety of other reasons - safety, security, modernization, cost, uniformity, discipline, ease of care, and many other reasons too numerous to mention. Marines once used muzzle-loaded weapons. Marines once used swords. Our beloved "Corps" has, by the grace of God, adopted battle techniques and weapons that reflect what has become necessary to defeat the enemies of this great nation. Time and again, Marines have risen to the occasion, distinguished themselves, and defeated those enemies or at least given them pause to reflect on who exactly they were fighting. The discipline, dedication, and esprit-de-corps as well as the heroism and love of country is alive and well in today's Marines.

Recently, I had the opportunity to "upgrade" my cell phone. My carrier offered me a wide variety of choices. Although, being retired, I really didn't need a "smart phone", that's exactly what I chose. Several weeks of trial and error were necessary before I fully understood the technology to be able to use the "smart phone" effectively. I'm glad I made the choice. I'm enjoying my new-found connection with the world. And, No, I'm not addicted to a machine.

I guess what I'm really trying to say is - Who cares why these "changes" have come about. What's important is that our beloved Marine Corps' ethos, mission, and brotherhood haven't changed, and never will. We must either accept and embrace "change" or go the way of all extinct species. Most of the time, "change" is for the better. OH - nostalgia - it's not broke, don't fix it. History and studying history is important, but let's not get so tied up with history and nostalgia that we forget that we must do what we have to do to insure the continuation of this great nation.

Present day Marines are well equipped both mentally, physically to do exactly that. Young people accept "change". So should us older folks.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


The Black Rifle

Sgt Grit,

Several stories have been posted recently about the Stoner rifles. Here's a little more info:

Eugene Stoner developed this rifle, and it had several variations. Most notably, the M16. He was the father of the M16. To fully understand the development and Vietnam problems with the M16, read the book "The Black Rifle", it's very informative. I met him once while working for Colt Firearms in the early 90's. He was also a WWII USMC Veteran.

Bill Guntor
USMC '66 - '69
RVN '67 - '69
1/1

Get a hardcover copy at "The Black Rifle".


Gung Ho And Lichtenstein Marines

Sgt.Grit,

Two comments please:

"Gung Ho", I read the book.

"Carlson's Raid, The Daring Marine Assault on Makin" by George W. Smith.

The book reports that Major Carlson visited with the Chinese Communist troops in the late 1930's in order to update the US Military. They were at that time, basically a guerrilla outfit. The book says (not me saying) that the battle cry of the Chicoms was GUNG HO, which translated into "All together".

Making bets, playing cards with the S.D.I... Possibly in the Lichtenstein Marines...

Bill Mc Dermott
180xxxx


Shaking My Head

Don't know why, but in the past month I've met two that claimed to be Marines, but just left me shaking my head.

The first was at the local rifle range. Don't remember how the conversation went that way, but he claimed to have gone to boot camp at "Camp Pendleton", had no idea what MCRD is, and claimed to have had a female drill instructor... at Camp Pendleton. Claimed to have gone to boot camp around 1994. I just packed up and left, and as I was pulling away, he was saying, "I know you don't believe me, but that's the honest truth." Odd experience, to say the least.

The second was down around Roswell, New Mexico. Saw a car with Marine stickers and asked who owned it. Guy spoke up, I asked when he was in the Marines and he answered, "a long time ago". I guess he had a guilty conscience, because it wasn't five minutes before he admitted he had never been in the Corps, he was an associate member of a Marine Corps motorcycle club. At least he was honest.

Maybe it was just my turn.

Earl Needham
Clovis, New Mexico USA

BTW, I was shooting a Winchester Model 70 in 7mm STW.


Betting With DI

Sgt. Grit,

After reading the post by Cpl Murphy regarding betting his S/DI at the range on Qual. day and playing card's while in Boot Camp, watching his D.I. crying after the Platoon screwed up sounds like a little B.S. thrown in... just saying.

Jim Scott Cpl.
'59-'65


I don't believe that a recruit made a bet with a drill instructor, I don't believe the recruit played poker with him either. I also don't believe a Marine unit went without food for 5 weeks. I call bulls--t...

Gene


Sgt Grit,

I re-read the post again and I am now convinced the guy is a fake. He called himself a Sea going bellhop. What Marine refers to himself by that moniker? Non-Marines and army and civilians call us that, but when is the last time you ever heard a Marine call himself that? I never have. Then he uses a lot of our phrases or buzzwords but used them with quotation marks to indicate that he knows the difference between several of them like hat and cover and pants and trousers. We all know those terms, he does not have to use quotation marks to prove to qualify them, we all know what he means to say. Personally I think he is an on-line lurker and studies our history and is just bullsh-tting us by stealing other Marines stories.

Don Shipley, the Navy SEAL who outs phony seals calls them lurkers. They troll the military websites and study the different branch's history and then cultivate their own image. I think that's what this guy did. I would have believed him though until he mentioned the bet with his DI and then playing cards with him? Naaaa Ain't no DI that ever walked this earth would allow that and if this guy was really a Marine he would know that! Thanks for letting me ramble Don!

Semper Fi
Mike


Gary Zanzalari has the same problem I have with a story in a previous Newsletter by a "marine" (lower case on purpose) claiming far too many liberties with his Drill Instructors. The overuse of recognized slang and nicknames made it glaringly obvious to this Marine that we were reading "The Life and Times of a Wanna-be". At first I questioned Sgt.Grit for including this story in the Newsletter, but then it dawned on me that it may have been for the purposes of giving real Marines a shot at this imposter by calling him out. Let it be said. Let it be done. He IS a Poser and NOT a Marine.

David B. McClellan
Viet Nam Combat Veteran
1969-1970
Former LCpl, Forever Marine.


Sgt Grit,

Sorry I am making a big deal about this, but if this clown is a poser it p-sses me off to no end! And then he talks about being a Corporal of Marines but being on point with "his radioman" and then his "sarge" this and sarge that. Was he in the Marines or the army? I don't know for sure, but his story just sounds like he read the stories of several Marines on this newsletter over the years and cultivated his own "history", and thought he could buffalo us into thinking he is one of us, but all he did was insult our intelligence.

Semper Fi Sgt Grit, this will be my last gripe on this issue!

Mike Kunkel
A real Corporal of Marines
3/8 Lima company, Weapons Platoon
0331
1981 to 1985


Bare Azs Minimum

Regarding the seabags that we left behind in Okinawa... I was with "F" Co 2nd Bn, 3rd Marines... we were leaving Camp Schwab aboard ships that took us to the P.I. for some jungle training. A brief sojourn in Thailand and in April 1965 we landed at DaNang. I left RVN in December 1965 and returned to Okinawa where someone was to bring us our left behind gear. I remember this very clearly I was handed my almost empty seabag it only contained one pair of dress shoes, no other article of clothing, a few days later we boarded a C-130 that touched down in Guam and again in Hawaii, where I was able to buy a pair of jeans and tennis shoes. Finally we arrived at El Toro about 8 am on 24 December. I was still wearing VN mud on my boots and clothing and had lost my cover as we boarded the aircraft in DaNang. We went thru the process getting paid etc. As I and a few others were on our way to the mess hall a young butter bar came rolling along in vehicle and commenced to give me a hassle regarding my lost cover. I left El Toro wearing the jeans tennis shoes and a liberated field jacket... One month later I reported back to Camp Pendleton wearing a business suit that I had sent home from Hong Kong and my dress shoes. I still had my VN jungle utilities that had been washed and patched. I was issued a bare asz minimum clothing, being that I only had one year left to do... but I wonder who got my stuff!

R.R. Lopez
Call sign: Double R


Marine Ink Of The Week

Submitted by V. Juarez

It is almost done, just needs to be touched up.


Best-Worst

'73-'74 TAD out of 1st Radio Bn FMF, KMCAS, HI to Shu Lin Kuo AB, Taiwan for six heavenly months. Houseboys to clean rooms (boots left outside your two man room - shined), one dollar for a haircut, shampoo, and shoulder massage (OH, YEAH - best groomed Marines in the Corps), and the best small chow hall in the Air Force (at least every two years, which is how often they would let them win it.) Three entrees every night, fresh salads, surf and turf (steak and lobster) once a week. I know that the grammar is lacking (no verbs), but I'm still drooling thinking about it (and that doesn't count the hammers downtown (sorry, brothers, if you haven't already told your wife about them, but 40 years oughta' buy you some forgiveness).

'74-'75 Worst chow hall - Homestead AFB - Food out of vacuum cans and roaches coming out of the tea dispensers (how did they get them in those same plastic bags that milk was dispensed from?)

Semper Fi,
George M. Button
MSgt USMC (ret)


Beautiful Bridges Where Marines Once Fought

The Banpo Bridge Moonlight Fountain, Seoul, South Korea.

The Dragon Bridge, DaNang, Vietnam.


Head Up Azz

To Sgt. J. Davis in regards to Uoo Garr... I have heard many variations to the story of where OOO-RAH came from including that it was from the Marine Raiders from WWII and their rides on subs. But I must say that the ARMY (Ain't Ready to be Marines Yet) is famous for their acronyms and they say WHO-AH which is the pronunciation of H-U-A another acronym for Head Up Azz (though some would say it means heard understood and acknowledged)...

Semper Fi to all my brothers and sisters


A Saddle

I admired the subject cover during all of WWII, as discussed in your 11 September News Letter.

After graduation from MCRD, PI, in December 1953, I strived to achieve the same look for my cover. This was finally accomplished by utilizing the proper head size frame, w/brim, adding a cover one size smaller, then a grommet one size larger.

The appearance of the result was occasionally referred to as a saddle. I remember after serving in the 2nd Division, reporting in to the CO of the Marine Detachment at Great Lakes for Electronics School, his comment was "Did you wear that cover in, or did you ride it?"

I would like to submit an additional comment... If your chevrons had crossed rifles, you were not in the Old Corps...

Best regards
Russ Hagerthey
142xxxx


Hi Sergeant Russel

I read Sgt Frank Rigiero's story about his girlfriend writing "YNK" (for "You'll Never Know" by Sinatra) on the outside of his letters while in Boot camp.

This reminded me of my own ordeal at the hands of Drill Instructor Sgt. Russell, Parris Island, circa 1980. I was/still am, an Irish Jersey boy with a ton of Jersey attitude. I quickly learned to despise Sgt. Russell and he had no great love for me either! I would write letters to my girlfriend back home in "Joisey" complaining about, cursing and praying for the occurrence of violent events that would rid my life of Sgt. Russell.

One evening, mail call was sounded by Sgt. Russell, and my name was called, I jumped up, ran to the quarter deck and just as I was about to clap the letter in my hands, Sgt. Russell looks at the back of the envelope where my dear sweet misguided girlfriend had written across the flap "Hi Sergeant Russel" in flowery print complete with hearts and smiley faces... to this day, I don't know what was worse, the PT I had to endure, or the lecture from that 6'5" red headed Alabama, backwoods redneck Sergeant about writing home about him and her misspelling of his name!

Needless to say, after I recovered from the verbal and physical assault, I Immediately scratched out a short, terse note to my girlfriend explaining what happened to me... and what would happen to her if she EVER wrote ANYTHING on the outside of the envelopes other than my name, address and the return address!

L/Cpl. Matt Penny
PLT 2047 - 1980


The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #9, #4)

He scribbled something on a 3x5 card. He asked Mary "Do you have a car?" She replied "No, but my fiance does." (That was the very first time she had called me her fiance. It was quite appropriate, I guess, because we had been talking of marriage.) He called for a volunteer to show Mary to her housing unit and gave the girl the card. We went out to my car and proceeded as directed by this young lady. She commented "This is a really nice car." It was the 1950 Buick that I had purchased in April. We got to the building where Mary was to reside while at Earlham. I got her lockerbox from the trunk and the two girls carried all of her other items. We went into the lounge and over to a desk where a woman was sitting. She was the House Mother and welcomed Mary to the house. The girl that had led us over there gave the H.M. the 3x5 card. She glanced at it and said loudly "Is there anyone here from Room #8?" One girl jumped up and came over to the desk. The H.M. said "Carolee, this is Mary. She will be your roommate." Carolee asked Mary "Where are you from?" Mary replied "I am from New Jersey." Carolee said "No kidding - where abouts in New Jersey?" Mary replied "Mt. Holly." And Carolee came back with "I don't believe it. I'm from Moorestown." Mary was thrilled and said "Well, I guess we shall renew the old football rivalry?" (For more than 25 years the teams from these two towns - only 8 miles apart - had battled on Thanksgiving Day.) Carolee got a rubber tired cart and I lifted Mary's lockerbox onto it. She said "I'll take you down to our room." Mary looked a bit puzzled and asked "Will this take long?" There was only a few minutes before I would have to be out of there. Carolee replied "Only 5 or 10." When Mary and I first entered the lounge there were about 10 to 12 girls there but all of a sudden there must have been 40 or more. I was told that the word had spread in the dining hall that there was a Marine in the lounge.

Mary returned and we had less than 10 minutes to go. We were holding hands and soon she wrapped her arms around my neck. I pulled her up close and wrapped my arms around her. We kissed - and kissed - and kissed some more - and when I thought it was time to quit - she put one hand behind my head - and pulled me closer for more. There was dead silence in the lounge. This must have been the longest kiss of all time. When it was over someone in the crowd said "You shouldn't be going to college; you should be heading for the altar!" We looked at each other. We each said to the other "I love you." And I left. When I reached the car I looked back. Mary was standing on the front stoop. We waved to each other. I headed for the gate with a little moisture in my eyes. The guard just waved me on through. I returned to the hotel. I planned to get a good night's sleep, get up early, and drive the whole way home on Sunday. I had thought I would be home before dark. But I had an idea. I called Earlham and asked what the visiting hours were on Sunday. They told me "After 10:00 for family members and then 1:00 to 5:00 for others."

I hatched a plan that I would put in place tomorrow.

'til next week. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Triggers

Nah... not those things you gently squeeze, nor more than one of Roy Roger's horse, but the things that stir the memory... (or, in the case of Marines, that might be more like stirring a cesspool?). I was mowing our yard yesterday... about half an acre, mostly Fescue (the Lawn Ranger takes care of fertilizer and 'pre-emergent' stuff for me... more about the Ranger further on...) Not being the sharpest knife in the box of light bulbs, I had elected (with some prodding from She Who Must Be Obeyed... but no batteries in the prod... this time...) to start this project around 10:30. This being Tennessee... and August... it was a tad on the warmish side. Also, being fiscally conservative (cheap), and bull-headed (according to SWMBO), I have carried out this domestic policing of the area for going on ten years with a twenty-one inch Toro rotary mower... although self-propelled, in these parts, it is type-identified as "a push mower". (go figure). Being reluctant to give up the garage space for a riding mower, so long as I can walk, and being too slow to control a 'zero-turn' mower, it works for me (at seventy-five...)

There is a "uniform of the day" for mowing... that being bilious green grass-stained tennie runners, black swim trunks, a white skivvie shirt (v-neck... they're hard to find...) and the official "Mowing Cover"... the latter looking much like an OD boonie hat, trimmed in white NACL2 until SWMBO captures it for enhanced interrogation techniques in her secret room (I sometimes hear liquid sounds and Thumpa-Thumpa-Thumpa noises coming from in there... and I don't go in there if there are any clean skivvies in my dresser drawer)... Thus properly attired, the mowing commenced, and as might be expected, the sweat began to roll... and I was soon soggy. Having been an early participant in the SEA war games, in the day, we had yet to adopt the later ubiquitous green towel around the neck, and as my mission reached the half-way point, I decided to take a break ('take ten... expect five... get three... offa yer azs and on yer feet... saddle up... move out") and went into the garage, which, while not air-conditioned, is about half buried, and remains cool... and grabbed one of those modern miracles, a plastic bottle of chilled water, out of the man cave refrigerator. At that point, the sweat saturated tee-shirt coolly clung to my back... feeling EXACTLY like a sweat-soaked nylon rip-stop medium regular utility jacket!... A mixed perception... blessed coolness, but slippery, almost slimy, clinging... for an instant there, I could have been somewhere outside of Tam Ky... or just arrived at The Rockpile... or?... Tis' said that smell is the strongest of memory triggers... could be... but that wet fabric was a contendah for a close second.

In re the Lawn Ranger... built the retirement home while commuting from CA (developer/contractor was a Huey crew chief in the Air Cav for TET), had seen the Lawn Ranger's trucks around the area, liked the sense of humor, wrote the phone number down. When I moved the wife and mother-in-law into the house, I gave her the phone number, told her to call the guy and get the skinny on the lawn service deal. When back in CA, called the wife, asked if she had contacted the Lawn Ranger... she said she had called the number, but got a voice mail saying they'd be gone for a week, as he had gone to Camp Pendleton to meet their two sons returning from Iraq... (2004)... told her to call back and leave the message that he had the job... Wally's company has been coming up this hill for ten years now... one of the sons works for the company, the other went on to Emory, and was commissioned as a Lt. a couple years back... got some of the better looking grass on our hill... (of course... all I do is mow it...)

Ddick


Short Rounds

Good Morning, just want to say 'Thank You'. I understand Sgt Grit has provided a shipment of surprises to one of my Platoon 331 recruits from 1959 -- a retired Marine MGySgt Bob Daniels. I was their DI at PI 55 years ago & we are having a reunion at MCB Quantico -- Sept. 24-27, 2014. So, thanks again Marine & Semper Fi.

Frank C. Foster
Capt USMC Ret.


Sgt Grit,

Just wanted you to know that I re-upped, renewed my subscription to your OUTSTANDING magazine, the gear is great, I also pass along a suggested Addition to your USMC book selection, I just finished "Red Blood Black Sand" by Chuck Tatum, The true story of from boot camp to Iwo Jima. Well worth reading and adding to your book list.

Semper Fi
Schrader, Gerard C
Sgt 2003XXX USMC

Note: Chuck was a great guy and Marine. When I would call him he would answer the phone "Pvt Tatum speaking". He also was a consultant on the movie Flags Of Our Fathers. He was in the machine gun team when Basilone was killed. Chuck passed this year. God Bless you Chuck, Semper Fi.

Sgt Grit


Drop your C--k and grab your socks it's another glorious day in the Marine Corps.

Semper Fi
Charles (SGT) Hightower '64-'67


LtCol Bull Fisher was CO of 2/4 when it left Hawaii to go to VN in 1965 and remained CO for some time in VN.


I was talking to a Marine customer the other day. He mentioned at MCRD San Diego in the 60's the navy had a boot camp across the fence. They got a lot of time off and would sit on the porch steps and wave, yell, and just harass Marine platoons as we did our thing.

Sgt Grit


Quotes

"Whoever does not have the stomach for this fight, let him depart. Give him money to speed his departure, since we wish not to die in that man's company. Whoever lives past today and comes home safely will rouse himself every year on this day, show his neighbor his scars, and tell embellished stories of all their great feats of battle. These stories he will teach his son and from this day until the end of the world we shall be remembered. We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for whoever has shed blood with me shall be my brother. And those men afraid to go will think themselves lesser men as they hear of how we fought and died together."


"All that is really great and inspiring, is created by the individual who can labor in freedom."
--Albert Einstein


"Cowardice asks the question: is it safe?
Expediency asks the question: is it politic?
Vanity asks the question: is it popular?
But conscience asks the question: is it right?
And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular; but one must take it because it is right."

"We should never forget that everything Adolph Hitler did in Germany was 'legal' and everything the Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was 'illegal'."
--Martin Luther King


"Marines have a cynical approach to war. They believe in three things; liberty, payday and that when two Marines are together in a fight, one is being wasted. Being a minority group militarily, they are proud and sensitive in their dealings with other military organizations. A Marine's concept of a perfect battle is to have other Marines on the right and left flanks, Marine aircraft overhead and Marine artillery and naval gunfire backing them up."
--War correspondent Ernie Pyle, killed on Ie Shima, Ryukyu Archipelago, 1945


"We're not accustomed to occupying defensive positions. It's destructive to morale."
--LtGen H. M. "Howlin' Mad" Smith, Iwo Jima, 1945, quoted to Walter Karig


"Liberty is meaningless if it is only the liberty to agree with those in power."
--Ludwig von Mises


"Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear."
--Ambrose Redman


"George Washington was one of the few men in all of human history who was not carried away by power."
--Robert Frost, Poet


"There is a rank due to the United States, among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war."
--George Washington, Fifth Annual Message, 1793


"Dress right... wait for it... DRESS! Too SLOW! Get back!"

"Currently Unassigned."

"I've never heard a funnier phrase than "2nd Fumble, Stumble, Stagger and Gag."

"Lean back... dig 'em in... heels, heels, heels!"

God Bless the Marine Corps,
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 11 SEP 2014

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• I Have Witnessed History
• Sea-Going Dip

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September 11th Graphic


Lt Presley O'Bannon's gravesite location marker

Lt Presley O'Bannon's tombstone with name spelled O'Banion

We all learned about Presley O'Bannon in boot camp and if we've read any history about the war against the Barbary pirates we've learned more about him. His name is always spelled "O'Bannon". Does anyone know why his name on his tombstone in the Kentucky State Cemetery is spelled "O'Banion"?

Dan Campbell '68-'72


Are You On The Rag Private

I'm with Cpl. Gerry Zanzalari from this week's newsletter. Here's a range story with no BS from August of 1967.

On pre-qual day the DIs, PMIs, a couple of officers and a Royal Marine in his beret were gathered in the center of the line at 500 yards around a large pan of fried chicken, obviously from the mess hall. When we tallied up the scores, I had shot a 234 which was the highest up and down the line. My coach told me I could go get a piece of chicken. I knew right away I was in deep sh-t but I couldn't figure a way out of it. When I arrived, my PMI asked what I had shot and I guess I sounded a little boastful when I told him. Like everybody I had my marksmanship book in the breast pocket of my shooting jacket with the pages held open with one of our clothes pins.

I am blessed with a fairly large nose which was bright red after two weeks on the range. He took the clothes pin and clipped it onto my sunburned nose. It was hard to disguise that I was p-ssed. He asked, "are you on the rag private"? He said open my mouth and took the wad of cotton from his pocked and shoved it in. The assembled group had a good laugh. He told me to go back and tell my coach that I was having my period. Never did get my chicken. The next day I shot 225 which earned me crossed rifles which was all I cared about anyway.

Jim Reese
PISC July-September '67


2/4 in 1965-66 at Chu Lai

2nd Battalion 4th Marines Sign from Vietnam

The attached photo is the original sign that was placed at the entrance to 2/4 in 1965-66 at Chu Lai. I recently received it from a 1st Division friend who also served during the same period and brought it home with him when he returned to CONUS. During the period this sign greeted all who entered 2/4's TAOR, the commanding officer was Lt. Col P. X. Kelly who later became the Commandant. Just want to share it with all who might remember, and remember the legacy of 2/4, second to none, the Magnificent Bast-rds.

Sgt. Dan Bisher
1963-1969
RVN '65-'66


Rib Med Banner

Make Sgt Grit your one stop shop for all of your Uniform Supplies such as medals, ribbons, and mounts. Mounting orders may take up to 7-10 business days to ship.

Cut-off date for ribbon/medal mounting for this year's ball is October 24th.


Calling Him Out

Gary Zanzalari has the same problem I have with a story in a previous Newsletter by a "marine" (lower case on purpose) claiming far too many liberties with his Drill Instructors. The overuse of recognized slang and nicknames made it glaringly obvious to this Marine that we were reading "The Life and Times of a Wanna-be". At first I questioned Sgt. Grit for including this story in the Newsletter, but then it dawned on me that it may have been for the purposes of giving real Marines a shot at this imposter by calling him out. Let it be said. Let it be done. He IS a Poser and NOT a Marine.

David B. McClellan
Former LCpl
Forever Marine
Viet Nam Combat Veteran, 1969-1970


VC Goodies

I too had my seabags sent to seabag heaven. I had my entire life in Vietnam in three seabags. As a medevac back to the World, I had no time to do anything. A close friend of mine packed those seabags which included over 70 rolls of 35 millimeter film as well as the camera and other VC goodies as well as all the regular stuff one collects from all over.

I returned almost immediately from the RVN and was hospitalized for a couple of months. I waited for over a year and then contacted my Congressman, Chet Holifield. He was able to find one seabag of a portion of my uniforms. Talk about a bummer - I know how they feel.

Frank "Tree" Remkiewicz


YNK

It was about the 4th or 5th week in Plt 406, at Parris Island in '56. My Sweetheart (Now my wife of 54 years) would send me mail almost every day. One day she put the letters YNK on the outside rear of the envelope. Our DI's always told us "anything on the outside is meant for them". So when I ran around the platoon to retrieve my letter from him he asked "What does YNK mean?" I guess he never heard of Frank Sinatra or the song "You'll never know" which was OUR song, because not meaning the way he took it, I said "SIR, You'll Never Know". I did push-ups and squat thrusts well into the dark. In my next letter to my girl I pleaded with her to NEVER put anything on the outside again.

Semper Fi Brothers,
Sgt Frank Rigiero '56/'59


I Have Witnessed History

Yesterday was the deactivation of 1st Battalion, 9th Marines who we all know are referred to as the "Walking Dead". Now all there is, is an awareness of the absolute honor, courage, and commitment of that storied regiment. Every Marine learns our history while in recruit training. I would urge all to look at the history of the Regiment and realize that those Marines and their squad, platoon, company, regiment, and battalion mirror all of us who have earned the title.

SSgt DJ Huntsinger
11th Marines '69-'70


Uoo Garr

I believe it was the early part of 1953 when the 1st Recon Company 1st Mar. Div. was given a mission for a 24 hour landing off the submarine USS Perch behind enemy lines in support of the Army's 45 ID on their attack on 'Old Baldy' depicted in the movie 'Hamburger Hill'. Recon at the time was short of people and drew some 'volunteers' from the 7th Marines. When the sub started the dive the intercom went UOO GARR, Uoo Garr dive, dive. That tickled all the Marines onboard. When Recon returned to division the 1st Sgt. called roll call just before he dismissed the formation he yell Uoo Gar. From my understanding Recon used it from that day in their running cadence. I think as Marines ran faster and longer and required more wind the phrase gradually converted to ooo rah. The correct pronunciation the ooo rah should sound similar the submarine horn. I disagree with Ray's idea we copied the call from the Army, I think it is the other way around. However if one listens close to the Army it sounds like 'Who Rah'.

That my story and I'm sticking to it...

Sgt. J. Davis
7th Marines Korea


Challenge Coins


Icee Tattoos

It is about 0200 hours, NAS Jacksonville, FL, Aviation Ordnance (AOA) School, early 1968. I am sitting on the porcelain throne. There are NO DOORS on the stalls in our barracks. I am sitting there trying to stay awake.

7-11 stores are still fairly new at the time. I think 7-11 was born in Florida. They have just begun selling the Icee's. As a promotion, when you purchased an Icee they gave you some stick-on tattoos. I'm sitting there, like I said, trying to stay awake, when in walks these two buddies of mine. Yeah, they're looking for me. And they are Drunk On Their Collective Azses!

They present themselves squarely in the doorway of the stall thereby sealing off any possibility of escape. Now, you have to envision my situation. There I sat, at the moment, I am in a most UN-compromising position. I can't even execute a proper defense being seated where I was, and they both "present", UH, I MEAN they both expose themselves. I am instantly thrown into a fit of laughter. There, squarely on the end of their appendages are the brightest red lips I had ever seen. At least when considering where I was seeing them.

Now, being aware of the sensitivity of this part of the male anatomy, I am righteously impressed at the pain they must have endured. They began telling me how much it hurt to get these beautiful lips "installed" shall we say... And how they had to pay the tattoo guy extra to cover the, um, shall we say "handling charges?"

Now I, being in a financially challenged period of my life, I am grossing, as a Private, $92 a month, do not get into town very much, and I certainly can't afford to get tattooed, therefore am uninformed on the subject of "Icee tattoos," So, initially, I am righteously impressed at the bravery, and the ability to withstand the incredible amount of pain they most assuredly had to suffer, and I am convinced right then that should I end up in battle, I would certainly choose my two buddies to be in the fighting hole with me when the attack comes. Two truly strong Marines!

I can't help but wonder, tho, do you think a tattoo artist