Sgt Grit Newsletter - 18 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Mama
• The Corps We've Got Right Now
• My Heart On The Line

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Reindeer replacements

Santa contacted the Marine Corps for possible replacements for Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen... The Corps sent Santa two of our own to relieve his aging herd... He named them SEMPER and FIDELIS.


8th and I

Love my plates. Only a Marine understands... Semper Fi!

Ed Fiducia

Square away your POV with Sgt Grit's Marine Corps Auto Accessories.

8th and I license plate


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Marine Mama

​It is a story of Thanksgiving, surprise, but most of all Love for a Mama, and family who haven't seen their Marine for a year, and very soon will again not see for another year.

I know there are so many families who have their beloved children, family members, and friends who are serving our great country near, and far, and so many other countries around the world. Whether it be in a combat or non-combat zone it is never easy to be separated from your loved ones for so long, but as Americans we're forever grateful to God and our Troops for keeping us safe and giving us our many freedoms.

I was given the best early Christmas gift a Marines' mama could ever have hoped for. While sitting at our computer wondering why our oldest son was not yet home he did arrive later than usual, and was followed by our Marine who very nonchalantly walks in behind his brother and simply says "Hi Mama" with a smile from ear to ear. Yes this mama's Marine is home, and we are so blessed to have our family united under the same roof again for the time being. There's no place like home, and this home is ever so at peace, with the greatest joy and appreciation for his safe return.

While he is 100% Marine, he still allows his mama to kiss him good night and echo the childhood whisper of "Sweet Dreams". It's so wonderful and such a beautiful feeling that does a mother's heart good.

From our family to yours it is our sincerest wish that as many of you as possible receive the gift of having your beloved Marine or what ever military branch they serve under, Troop Hero home for the most special and blessed time of the year Christmas, and hopefully the New Year too!

God Bless Us Everyone, and Especially God Bless Our Troops from past, present, and those in the future yet to join one of our many great military forces.

God Bless America forevermore! We support our troops always have and always will.

Merry Christmas Everyone, and a Safe, Healthy, and most Happy New Year, and all those that follow!

Proud U.S. Marine Family
Mama & Papa Delgado & Sons


Snoop And Poop

Just sounding off with thoughts about being in the rear and not in the bush. At DaNang in '65, the rear and the front were only the direction you were facing. After immediate clearing of the strip areas did the lines become established. Then the rockets and mortars began. With a M.T. 3531 MOS many of those runs out to forward sites became quite warm and many a return to DaNang home base was with truck rails shot away and air holes in the 6x's body. MLR time at night attch. to grunt units around the base was interesting also. While we pretty much didn't worry about NVA, charlie had a huge perimeter to "snoop and poop" around, and they did it often to test response times etc. Each day dozens of civilians were brought onto the base for pay to do chores for the govt., how many Charlies came along with those numbers? There was almost no accountability on those numbers who left the base at 1600 hrs. If charlie hid behind he had to be rooted out after dark. He knew where all their stuff was while we had to find it all. Hey, look, I'm sorry to ramble on as I did and I pray often for our grunt brothers who did the hump. Their the finest.

Semper Fi,
MGM/Joe Corps '63-'67 Nam '65-'66


Inspiration Before The Battle

GySgt Walgren's Speech before assault on Marjah, Afghanistan

GySgt Walgren's speech before the Marine assualt on Marjah, Afghanistan.

Gotta love the Gunny!


Never Quit, Never Give Up Attitude

Jim Brower headstone

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Here is how I used one of your coins. Most tombstones (called Memorial Stones today) tell you little or nothing about the person. I wanted anyone doing genealogy on me or my family to know that I made three accomplishment in my life. When I die, people will know that I am currently still a Marine assigned to guarding the streets of Heaven. They will know that I was a Chiropractor. And I was pilot.

The paint may fade with time, but the image of the Eagle, Globe and Anchor should last as long as the stone.

If it was not for the "Never Quit, Never Give-up" attitude that I learned while I was on active duty in the Marines, I doubt if I could have completed the 4-years of chiropractic college and I doubt if I could have become am instrument rated, commercial pilot. I am 73-years-old and I am currently fighting Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia that may eventually kill me, but I am giving this cancer one H-ll-Of-A Fight because the Marines taught us that there are no rules in a fight for your life.

Just one more use for Grunt.com coins.

God Bless the Marine Corps,

Jim Brower
Active duty 1961-1964, but still a Marine!


Stolen Valor

Obviously, this poser didn't think that anyone would notice that he had every ribbon on the Marine Corps ribbon chart upon his chest. Not to mention that he also has an EOD Badge and a Navy Seal badge.

(This photo was obtained from thebrigade.thechive.com.)

Stolen Valor Poser


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Christmas Shipping Deadlines


The Corps We've Got Right Now

The recent Old Corps/New Corps discussion in the newsletter brought to mind a great Marine we lost in 2000 - Lt. Col. William Corson - whom I had the honor of meeting and becoming friends with in 1980.

I would be surprised if there are not more than a few newsletter subscribers who remember Bill Corson. He joined the Marines as a teenager during WWII, fighting on Guam and Bougainville, rising to the rank of Sergeant. After returning to civilian life and earning a Master's Degree in economics, Bill re-entered the Corps as an officer. He served as a tank commander during the Korean War and commanded a tank battalion in Vietnam in 1966. In 1967 he was placed in charge of the Combined Action Program.

Two other Marines and myself were having lunch with Bill one day at his table at the Hay-Adams when one of the others said something to the effect, "Not like the Old Corps, eh Colonel?" to which Bill replied, "There's no Old Corps and there's no New Corps. There's just the Corps we've got right now."

Somehow I think Gunny Rousseau would appreciate that observation.

Semper Fidelis,
Gary Harlan
Sergeant of Marines


Here's My Take

In Response to Me. Deleon:

I've had the conversation about Combat Marines vs. Non-combatant Marines with many Marines who did not get shot at.

Here's my take:

You made it through the toughest initiation of all the services.

You volunteered when others would not.

You served, wore the uniform proudly, and we're ready and willing to put yourself in harms way.

You did not shirk your duty nor ignore your conscience.

I did not win the Medal of Honor, Navy Cross, Silver Star, etc while serving in Vietnam Nam. I did the best I could. I led my Marines to the best of my ability. Don't sell yourself short. You don't have to be shot at to be a Marine. You are a "Bro" forever.

Five days ago I presented the flag to the wife of a L/Cpl reservist who served his four years plus two years inactive. He was never deployed. He was only 69 yrs old. He is a Marine.

Case closed. Thanks for your service. You were and are important.

Joe Neff, LtCol, USMCR(Ret)


One And Done Grunt

One of my memories of boot camp is the last day. During the late afternoon/early evening of our last day, we were gathered around our Platoon Commander in a loose grabasstical formation and he was reading out the MOS/duty stations for each of us. As he called each (now) Marine's name and spieled off the future duty station and MOS of that Marine, I recall standing there with b-tt cheeks clenched tight, whispering a mantra to myself, "Please God not 0300, Please God not 0300." God must have heard me and decided to smile down on my dumb azs because when S/Sgt Way got to me I heard sweet words come out of his mouth, "Private Downen. Port Hueneme 1100." WTF? What the h-ll is an 1100? Oh well. At least it's not 0300. After four months of school at the Seabee base at Port Hueneme (Oxnard) CA, I reported into h-ll, oops sorry, 29 Palms, as an 1141 Electrician.

Even though I ended up a Continuous Wave Radar Repairman in a HAWK missile Battalion, I did get to play Grunt once. I was with Bravo Battery, 1st LAAM Bn on Monkey Mountain just a little north and a little east of Da Nang. In early 1966, we got a new 1st Sgt and he came to us from Recon. I'm sorry, I don't remember his name but I remember one of his decisions. He decided we should start patrols down the side of the mountain. Okee dokee then. The first patrol was down the north side of the mountain and it was a fairly large one, probably 10-12 Marines of which I was one. Our piece of Monkey Mountain (Hill 647) was just a skosh over 2,000 feet high (remember that because it's about 600 ft shy of a half mile). So we follow this little creek down the side of the mountain and get almost down to the beach (probably making so much noise you could have heard us in Da Nang on the other side of the mountain) when Farrell (I think that's who it was) slipped on a wet rock in the creek and messed up his knee something fierce. Until I talked to a couple of guys who were on the patrol with us, I remembered hauling him on down to the beach and calling in a medivac but a couple of the other guys remember carrying his long lanky azs (God we were all so skinny in those days) back up the mountain to the battery area. The patrols continued but the size was cut back and that was the only one I went on. No contact with Sir Charles. Does that qualify me for a one and done Grunt?

Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Cpl. Jerry D.
USMC '62-'66
RVN '65-'66​


Kicking My Own Azs

I was re-reading some of my Sgt. Grit newsletters and came upon this from Chris Eddins - Lakeview, Alabama. He has a lot of pride in "I am the grandson of a First Division Marine, Staff Sergeant Robert (Pete) Nelson, who served his country proudly during WW2," and states he wishes YOU would make him a shirt that says "Still kicking my own azs for not joining the Corps 23 years ago". Of course now you would have to add 5 years to that.

So, put that in your next newsletter, and see if he orders one.

Semper Fi
Rusty Norman
Echo 2/9 1969
USMC 1966-69​


Suicide By Knife

Short nihongo lesson for Gy Rosseau... Hari Kari, or "Seppuku" is suicide by knife to the belly... bit of a ritual that went with that... the sacrifcial planes (and boats) were Kamikaze... roughly, 'divine wind'... relates back to a victory in the Russo-Sino war of very early 20th century. The explosive-laden boats I have also heard referred to as some form of "Baka"... our snack bar/boot repair/translator entrepreneur at MB Naha used to refer to one of us as "Baka-tadae"... or crazy... or, sometimes, ol' Toshio would just call the guy a crazy dumb sumb-tch (Tosh was fluent in a couple of languages, one of which was Marine slang... recall a rumor heard when up at Schwab to shoot the range about 1960 that some 3rd Recon Bn grunts poking around on the coast north of Schwab had found a sea cave with a couple of the Baka boats still hidden inside... pretty plausible, given that it was only 15 years after the war...

BTW... have decided we might call the really, really old Gunny (Freas), 'the Portuguese Lothario'... used to work with one, taught me the difference between "Gar-see-ah" and 'Garsha'. I got a quarter that sez Freas is a Portuguese family name...

Ddick


Forgave Me For Being A Jughead

To Vic DeLeon:

If your story was '69-70 , and it was a C-130, it might have been "The Shadow". In the '80s and '90s I had the honor of working as a veterans advocate with USAF (ret) Col. Franz Schmucker who had (in '69) pulled my sad Marine b-tt out of a jam when we were both younger. He forgave me for being a Jughead and I ignored the fact that he was one of my fathers wingwipers...

Semper Fi to all our Brothers, regardless of branch.

Peter D.


Skivvie Guard Duty

MCRD San Diego, 1951, after we hand washed our skivvies, and were told by Cpl. Netterberg that if he saw any nicotine stains on them, "you will chew them out", clean skivvies were hung with tie-ties and care, and had 4-hour shifts of guard duty till dry. That was the old Corps you hear stories about.

Dick Watson
Cpl '51-'55
1266xxx
Would do it again in a heartbeat... Semper Fi


Harry T

Sgt. Grit,

The letter titled "Anti-Corps, Harry T" sent by GySgt FL Rousseau, was right on the money! In fact, I refer to that very truth in my recently completed book, EXCITEMENT: Shot At And Missed, which is at my publisher and should be in print by early Spring 2015. It is a first-hand account of the Marines of F-2-5, 1st MarDiv, as related to me by my brother, Sgt. Ken Lonn, a Section Chief of 60mm mortars and rockets in Korea, 1951-52. The book takes the reader from hometown, through boot camp and a year in Korea. Here is an excerpt dealing with the President's desire to eliminate the Marine Corps.

-----

"Because of President Truman's personal dislike for the United States Marine Corps, and guided by his Cabinet and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Marine Corps was slashed from a peak strength of 485,833** officers and enlisted at the end of that war to a total Corps strength of only 74,279. The Administration and its Army advisors had concluded that the Marine Corps would no longer be needed. This was strongly stated by Truman's Secretary of Defense, Louis A. Johnson, to Admiral Richard L. Connally in 1949, to whit, "We'll never have any more amphibious operations. That does away with the Marine Corps. And the Air Force can do anything the Navy can do nowadays, so that does away with the Navy."

The Second World War had been won! Marines had fought with determination, bravery and tenacity. And the thanks they got was; 'Take a hike! Your services are no longer needed! Don't let the door hit you in the b-tt as you leave!' That was not exactly the 'thank you' the heroes of Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Iwo Jima and Okinawa expected.

But when the conflict erupted in Korea, the leadership in Washington DC soon came to realize that the nation did, indeed, still need its 'soldiers of the sea', because in the early days of what became known as the Korean War, the outcome was looking very bleak. In fact, by the end of July, the situation was very much in doubt for the U.N. forces. With the Army clinging desperately to its small perimeter at the southwest end of the Korean peninsula, the Marine Corps was ordered to send troops to the battle zone – immediately! Yeah, right!"

-----

I'll let you and your readers know when the book will be available.

Semper Fi
Bob Lonn​


Regarding Harry,

Harry was not against the Corps, he wanted to combine all services! Check your history, he fired the "God" of the Army in Korea! We need more Harry Trumans!

Darrell "Gene" Cordes
Sgt. "Old Corps"​


Olde Salt Colleagues

I owe a sincere apology to Daniel Flynn; shortly after I forwarded the below response to his posting, I began hearing an echoing refrain in my brainless housing group: "Battle jacket, battle jacket, battle jacket." I contacted two of my olde salt colleagues and put the question to them, and they both, independently responded that my future was destined to be an occupant of a nursing home for olde folks. Incidentally, there were also kahki style Battle jackets (I have photos of my brother June, 25 1950, where he is wearing one at the Marine Reserve Battalion out of 'Boston, MA - he and his unit coincidentally were that very day on the way to Camp Lejeune for summer training when the North Koreans invaded South Korea; that two week training went on for two more years).

Will Clifford
Capt., USMC (Ret)
CWO-3


Product Of The Depression

Sgt. Grit,

A Career in Navy/Marine Corps Meals. I got thinking about the meals I have had in Navy and Marine Corps Mess Halls. The most remembered was the beans for Breakfast on Wednesday and Sundays mornings in Navy Mess Halls during World War II. Aboard ship, we Marines ate the same thing as the Sailors.

I am a product of the Depression, when some times we didn't get all the things we needed for Breakfast. Most breakfast were Oatmeal probably because it was the cheapest meal to prepare and the most nutritious.

Entering the Mess Halls were not the same as eating at home. You line up according to your Platoon schedule, then with your DI rushing you through the chow line so he could get back on schedule with your training. At Treasure Island, during WWII they had recalled two Old CPO's that were at least in their seventies and they ran the Mess Hall Lines which were constant from Dawn and Before. After Boot camp came (from my point of view, cause I was loaded aboard ship soon after) ship board food. Some great and some forgetful. "C" Ration Breakfasts, Lunches and Dinners were the norm, with long lines waiting at your designated mess hall entrance, sometimes getting in line for Lunch after Breakfast because there were several thousand on board the ship.​

I went from Pearl Harbor to Guam in June of 1944 arriving as the Island was Secured, so we lacked the fine meals at tables in the Mess Hall to meals made from "C" rats and served in your meat can and cover, with you sitting where ever hoping to get some of the chow before someone screamed about get moving again.

Korean War Chow wasn't much different from WWII chow, they had been working on it, BUT there were warehouses full of WWII "C's" that needed to be eaten up.

Between Wars I had been at Guard Detachments that served great food and Infantry Training that served WWII Rations, now and then some one would scream and we would have Steaks, mashed Potatoes and Gravy, just like home.

But with all the training, I was hard as a rock and hungry all the time.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


My Heart On The Line

By Frank Schaeffer
The Washington Post

Before my son became a Marine, I never thought much about who was defending me.

Now when I read of the war on terrorism or the coming conflict in Iraq, it cuts to my heart. When I see a picture of a member of our military who has been killed, I read his or her name very carefully. Sometimes I cry.

In 1999, when the barrel-chested Marine recruiter showed up in dress blues and bedazzled my son John, I did not stand in the way. John was headstrong, and he seemed to understand these stern, clean men with straight backs and flawless uniforms. I did not. I live in the Volvo-driving, higher education-worshiping North Shore of Boston. I write novels for a living. I have never served in the military.

It had been hard enough sending my two older children off to Georgetown and New York University. John's enlisting was unexpected, so deeply unsettling. I did not relish the prospect of answering the question, "So where is John going to college?" from the parents who were itching to tell me all about how their son or daughter was going to Harvard. At the private high school John attended, no other students were going into the military.

"But aren't the Marines terribly Southern?" asked one perplexed mother while standing next to me at the brunch following graduation. "What a waste, he was such a good student," said another parent. One parent (a professor at a nearby and rather famous university) spoke up at a school meeting and suggested that the school should "carefully evaluate what went wrong."

When John graduated from three months of boot camp on Parris Island, 3,000 parents and friends were on the parade deck stands. We parents and our Marines not only were of many races but also were representative of many economic classes. Many were poor. Some arrived crammed in the backs of pickups, others by bus. John told me that a lot of parents could not afford the trip.

We in the audience were white and Native American. We were Hispanic, Arab, and African American, and Asian. We were former Marines wearing the scars of battle, or at least baseball caps emblazoned with battles' names. We were Southern whites from Nashville and skinheads from New Jersey, black kids from Cleveland wearing ghetto rags and white ex-cons with ham-hock forearms defaced by jailhouse tattoos. We would not have been mistaken for the educated and well-heeled parents gathered on the lawns of John's private school a half-year before.

After graduation one new Marine told John, "Before I was a Marine, if I had ever seen you on my block I would've probably killed you just because you were standing there." This was a serious statement from one of John's good friends, a black ex-gang member from Detroit who, as John said, "would die for me now, just like I'd die for him."

My son has connected me to my country in a way that I was too selfish and insular to experience before. I feel closer to the waitress at our local diner than to some of my oldest friends. She has two sons in the Corps. They are facing the same dangers as my boy. When the guy who fixes my car asks me how John is doing, I know he means it. His younger brother is in the Navy.

Why were I and the other parents at my son's private school so surprised by his choice? During World War II, the sons and daughters of the most powerful and educated families did their bit. If the idea of the immorality of the Vietnam War was the only reason those lucky enough to go to college dodged the draft, why did we not encourage our children to volunteer for military service once that war was done?

Have we wealthy and educated Americans all become pacifists? Is the world a safe place? Or have we just gotten used to having somebody else defend us? What is the future of our democracy when the sons and daughters of the janitors at our elite universities are far more likely to be put in harm's way than are any of the students whose dorms their parents clean?

I feel shame because it took my son's joining the Marine Corps to make me take notice of who is defending me. I feel hope because perhaps my son is part of a future "greatest generation." As the storm clouds of war gather, at least I know that I can look the men and women in uniform in the eye.

My son is one of them. He is the best I have to offer. He is my heart.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #2)

It was getting late and I wanted to see my bedroom - and the new furniture my parents had purchased for me. Mom asked if I wanted anything more to eat before we went upstairs. My answer was "No!" We went upstairs. They showed me their room. They had gotten a new king size bed - but most of their furniture was that which they had for years. They showed me the other two rooms on that floor. They were to be for guests and had all new furniture - a king size bed in one and twin beds in the other. My Mom must have had a ball when shopping for furniture. Then we went into my room. I could hardly believe my eyes when she flipped on the lights. It was beautiful. I gave them hugs when I saw it. All of these rooms were the same size - quite large - about 12 x 20 feet. They said that those on the 3rd floor were the same. The only difference was the height of the ceilings - 10 ft. on the 2nd floor and 8 ft. on the 3rd. My bed was a queen size and made me think of sometime sharing it with the love of my life, Mary. The rest of the furniture was quite masculine and appropriate for a Marine Sergeant. I thanked them over and over. I went into a bathroom, took a shower and got ready to turn in for the night. Boy did I sleep - until my usual wake up time - 0500. When we lived on the farm that was the time that everyone was up and my parents had not gotten out of the habit.

They were in one bathroom while I was in the other - and we all went downstairs together. We went into the kitchen so Mom could prepare breakfast. Dad said that he was going to take the Oldsmobile to Anderson Olds for a complete check-up and he doubted that he would be back for lunch. He asked if I would like to ride along. I declined. I told him I wanted to talk with my Mom. After Mom had done the dishes we went into the living room. She said "I understand you wanted to talk with me?" I said "Yes. We have to talk." She was both attentive and puzzled. I went on "As they say, I am now free, white and twenty one. Do you know what 'Platonic' means?" She replied "I never heard the word. How is it spelled?" That didn't surprise me. I said "Capital 'P'-l-a-t-o-n-i-c. You can look it up in the dictionary or the Book of Knowledge later. But I will tell you what it means right now. A 'Platonic relationship' or 'Platonic lifestyle' means a love that is devoid of or without sexual relations... Are you with me so far?" She said "Yes, I am with you. Continue." I continued "Mary and I have been going steady for more than four years - and we are very much in love with each other. And it is our choice to live a Platonic lifestyle - until we are married... Do you understand that so far?" She said "I think that is commendable. I am glad to hear that." I told her "It is also our choice to 'sleep together' at various times. You are a Christian Scientist by choice and Mary's parents are Quakers by choice and they are aware of our choice to live a 'Platonic lifestyle' - and permit us to 'sleep together' in their home. And I expect you to permit us to do the same here. I know this may be a shock to you - and your way of thinking - but I want you to think this over carefully before you say anything. I will be leaving for Camp Lejeune at 7:00 PM. There is no hurry for a decision. I do not expect to see Mary again before Thanksgiving weekend. But I would like to have her stay with me for a day or two that weekend. I will be staying with her at her house for part of that weekend. PLEASE, I hope you can accept this. Now, How about you and I going out for lunch - and I will not take 'No' for an answer. Dad doesn't expect to be back for lunch."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

I've been following the tracking of a package I ordered. We have a present thief in our neighborhood, so I want to keep a close eye on when it arrives. My son was concerned that the package would get stolen. I told him not to worry because it is a Marine Corps bear and if anyone tried to steal him, the bear would kick his b-tt!

Rita Larson


Quotes

"There can be no greater error than to expect, or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation. 'Tis an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard."
--George Washington


"Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure."
--Thomas Jefferson


They told (us) to open up the Embassy, or "we'll blow you away." And then they looked up and saw the Marines on the roof with these really big guns, and they said in Somali, "Igaralli ahow," which means "Excuse me, I didn't mean it, my mistake."
--Karen Aquilar, in the U.S. Embassy; Mogadishu, Somalia, 1991


"For over 221 years our Corps has done two things for this great Nation. We make Marines, and we win battles."
--Gen. Charles C. Krulak, USMC (CMC); 5 May 1997


"It is mostly a matter of wills. Whose will is going to break first? Ours or the enemy's?"
--General James Mattis


"You people are making me very unhappy! Just because the sand fleas get in your noses and your ears and crawl down your necks, you clowns think you have the right to kill them. I don't care how much they bite, you will pretend that you do not feel it!

Do you hear me?

"Yes, sir!"

"You can slap a sand flea in the jungle and if the enemy sees you slap or hears you move, you'll be dead before you get your hand down. You can knock a bug off your shoulder and be dead before that bug hits the deck."

"Still wandering around on the DMZ" every night!

God Bless the American Dream!
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 18 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• Marine Mama
• The Corps We've Got Right Now
• My Heart On The Line

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

Flags   Family Member   Ka-Bars   Auto   Headgear  Jackets  ALL CATEGORIES  

Request a catalog
Facebook Twitter Sgt Grit Blog Sgt Grit's RSS Feeds

Santa contacted the Marine Corps for possible replacements for Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen... The Corps sent Santa two of our own to relieve his aging herd... He named them SEMPER and FIDELIS.


8th and I

Love my plates. Only a Marine understands... Semper Fi!

Ed Fiducia

Square away your POV with Sgt Grit's Marine Corps Auto Accessories.


Marine Mama

​It is a story of Thanksgiving, surprise, but most of all Love for a Mama, and family who haven't seen their Marine for a year, and very soon will again not see for another year.

I know there are so many families who have their beloved children, family members, and friends who are serving our great country near, and far, and so many other countries around the world. Whether it be in a combat or non-combat zone it is never easy to be separated from your loved ones for so long, but as Americans we're forever grateful to God and our Troops for keeping us safe and giving us our many freedoms.

I was given the best early Christmas gift a Marines' mama could ever have hoped for. While sitting at our computer wondering why our oldest son was not yet home he did arrive later than usual, and was followed by our Marine who very nonchalantly walks in behind his brother and simply says "Hi Mama" with a smile from ear to ear. Yes this mama's Marine is home, and we are so blessed to have our family united under the same roof again for the time being. There's no place like home, and this home is ever so at peace, with the greatest joy and appreciation for his safe return.

While he is 100% Marine, he still allows his mama to kiss him good night and echo the childhood whisper of "Sweet Dreams". It's so wonderful and such a beautiful feeling that does a mother's heart good.

From our family to yours it is our sincerest wish that as many of you as possible receive the gift of having your beloved Marine or what ever military branch they serve under, Troop Hero home for the most special and blessed time of the year Christmas, and hopefully the New Year too!

God Bless Us Everyone, and Especially God Bless Our Troops from past, present, and those in the future yet to join one of our many great military forces.

God Bless America forevermore! We support our troops always have and always will.

Merry Christmas Everyone, and a Safe, Healthy, and most Happy New Year, and all those that follow!

Proud U.S. Marine Family
Mama & Papa Delgado & Sons


Snoop And Poop

Just sounding off with thoughts about being in the rear and not in the bush. At DaNang in '65, the rear and the front were only the direction you were facing. After immediate clearing of the strip areas did the lines become established. Then the rockets and mortars began. With a M.T. 3531 MOS many of those runs out to forward sites became quite warm and many a return to DaNang home base was with truck rails shot away and air holes in the 6x's body. MLR time at night attch. to grunt units around the base was interesting also. While we pretty much didn't worry about NVA, charlie had a huge perimeter to "snoop and poop" around, and they did it often to test response times etc. Each day dozens of civilians were brought onto the base for pay to do chores for the govt., how many Charlies came along with those numbers? There was almost no accountability on those numbers who left the base at 1600 hrs. If charlie hid behind he had to be rooted out after dark. He knew where all their stuff was while we had to find it all. Hey, look, I'm sorry to ramble on as I did and I pray often for our grunt brothers who did the hump. Their the finest.

Semper Fi,
MGM/Joe Corps '63-'67 Nam '65-'66


Inspiration Before The Battle

GySgt Walgren's speech before the Marine assualt on Marjah, Afghanistan.

Gotta love the Gunny!


Never Quit, Never Give Up Attitude

Dear Sgt. Grit,

Here is how I used one of your coins. Most tombstones (called Memorial Stones today) tell you little or nothing about the person. I wanted anyone doing genealogy on me or my family to know that I made three accomplishment in my life. When I die, people will know that I am currently still a Marine assigned to guarding the streets of Heaven. They will know that I was a Chiropractor. And I was pilot.

The paint may fade with time, but the image of the Eagle, Globe and Anchor should last as long as the stone.

If it was not for the "Never Quit, Never Give-up" attitude that I learned while I was on active duty in the Marines, I doubt if I could have completed the 4-years of chiropractic college and I doubt if I could have become am instrument rated, commercial pilot. I am 73-years-old and I am currently fighting Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia that may eventually kill me, but I am giving this cancer one H-ll-Of-A Fight because the Marines taught us that there are no rules in a fight for your life.

Just one more use for Grunt.com coins.

God Bless the Marine Corps,

Jim Brower
Active duty 1961-1964, but still a Marine!


Stolen Valor

Obviously, this poser didn't think that anyone would notice that he had every ribbon on the Marine Corps ribbon chart upon his chest. Not to mention that he also has an EOD Badge and a Navy Seal badge.

(This photo was obtained from thebrigade.thechive.com.)


The Corps We've Got Right Now

The recent Old Corps/New Corps discussion in the newsletter brought to mind a great Marine we lost in 2000 - Lt. Col. William Corson - whom I had the honor of meeting and becoming friends with in 1980.

I would be surprised if there are not more than a few newsletter subscribers who remember Bill Corson. He joined the Marines as a teenager during WWII, fighting on Guam and Bougainville, rising to the rank of Sergeant. After returning to civilian life and earning a Master's Degree in economics, Bill re-entered the Corps as an officer. He served as a tank commander during the Korean War and commanded a tank battalion in Vietnam in 1966. In 1967 he was placed in charge of the Combined Action Program.

Two other Marines and myself were having lunch with Bill one day at his table at the Hay-Adams when one of the others said something to the effect, "Not like the Old Corps, eh Colonel?" to which Bill replied, "There's no Old Corps and there's no New Corps. There's just the Corps we've got right now."

Somehow I think Gunny Rousseau would appreciate that observation.

Semper Fidelis,
Gary Harlan
Sergeant of Marines


Here's My Take

In Response to Me. Deleon:

I've had the conversation about Combat Marines vs. Non-combatant Marines with many Marines who did not get shot at.

Here's my take:

You made it through the toughest initiation of all the services.

You volunteered when others would not.

You served, wore the uniform proudly, and we're ready and willing to put yourself in harms way.

You did not shirk your duty nor ignore your conscience.

I did not win the Medal of Honor, Navy Cross, Silver Star, etc while serving in Vietnam Nam. I did the best I could. I led my Marines to the best of my ability. Don't sell yourself short. You don't have to be shot at to be a Marine. You are a "Bro" forever.

Five days ago I presented the flag to the wife of a L/Cpl reservist who served his four years plus two years inactive. He was never deployed. He was only 69 yrs old. He is a Marine.

Case closed. Thanks for your service. You were and are important.

Joe Neff, LtCol, USMCR(Ret)


One And Done Grunt

One of my memories of boot camp is the last day. During the late afternoon/early evening of our last day, we were gathered around our Platoon Commander in a loose grabasstical formation and he was reading out the MOS/duty stations for each of us. As he called each (now) Marine's name and spieled off the future duty station and MOS of that Marine, I recall standing there with b-tt cheeks clenched tight, whispering a mantra to myself, "Please God not 0300, Please God not 0300." God must have heard me and decided to smile down on my dumb azs because when S/Sgt Way got to me I heard sweet words come out of his mouth, "Private Downen. Port Hueneme 1100." WTF? What the h-ll is an 1100? Oh well. At least it's not 0300. After four months of school at the Seabee base at Port Hueneme (Oxnard) CA, I reported into h-ll, oops sorry, 29 Palms, as an 1141 Electrician.

Even though I ended up a Continuous Wave Radar Repairman in a HAWK missile Battalion, I did get to play Grunt once. I was with Bravo Battery, 1st LAAM Bn on Monkey Mountain just a little north and a little east of Da Nang. In early 1966, we got a new 1st Sgt and he came to us from Recon. I'm sorry, I don't remember his name but I remember one of his decisions. He decided we should start patrols down the side of the mountain. Okee dokee then. The first patrol was down the north side of the mountain and it was a fairly large one, probably 10-12 Marines of which I was one. Our piece of Monkey Mountain (Hill 647) was just a skosh over 2,000 feet high (remember that because it's about 600 ft shy of a half mile). So we follow this little creek down the side of the mountain and get almost down to the beach (probably making so much noise you could have heard us in Da Nang on the other side of the mountain) when Farrell (I think that's who it was) slipped on a wet rock in the creek and messed up his knee something fierce. Until I talked to a couple of guys who were on the patrol with us, I remembered hauling him on down to the beach and calling in a medivac but a couple of the other guys remember carrying his long lanky azs (God we were all so skinny in those days) back up the mountain to the battery area. The patrols continued but the size was cut back and that was the only one I went on. No contact with Sir Charles. Does that qualify me for a one and done Grunt?

Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Cpl. Jerry D.
USMC '62-'66
RVN '65-'66​


Kicking My Own Azs

I was re-reading some of my Sgt. Grit newsletters and came upon this from Chris Eddins - Lakeview, Alabama. He has a lot of pride in "I am the grandson of a First Division Marine, Staff Sergeant Robert (Pete) Nelson, who served his country proudly during WW2," and states he wishes YOU would make him a shirt that says "Still kicking my own azs for not joining the Corps 23 years ago". Of course now you would have to add 5 years to that.

So, put that in your next newsletter, and see if he orders one.

Semper Fi
Rusty Norman
Echo 2/9 1969
USMC 1966-69​


Suicide By Knife

Short nihongo lesson for Gy Rosseau... Hari Kari, or "Seppuku" is suicide by knife to the belly... bit of a ritual that went with that... the sacrifcial planes (and boats) were Kamikaze... roughly, 'divine wind'... relates back to a victory in the Russo-Sino war of very early 20th century. The explosive-laden boats I have also heard referred to as some form of "Baka"... our snack bar/boot repair/translator entrepreneur at MB Naha used to refer to one of us as "Baka-tadae"... or crazy... or, sometimes, ol' Toshio would just call the guy a crazy dumb sumb-tch (Tosh was fluent in a couple of languages, one of which was Marine slang... recall a rumor heard when up at Schwab to shoot the range about 1960 that some 3rd Recon Bn grunts poking around on the coast north of Schwab had found a sea cave with a couple of the Baka boats still hidden inside... pretty plausible, given that it was only 15 years after the war...

BTW... have decided we might call the really, really old Gunny (Freas), 'the Portuguese Lothario'... used to work with one, taught me the difference between "Gar-see-ah" and 'Garsha'. I got a quarter that sez Freas is a Portuguese family name...

Ddick


Forgave Me For Being A Jughead

To Vic DeLeon:

If your story was '69-70 , and it was a C-130, it might have been "The Shadow". In the '80s and '90s I had the honor of working as a veterans advocate with USAF (ret) Col. Franz Schmucker who had (in '69) pulled my sad Marine b-tt out of a jam when we were both younger. He forgave me for being a Jughead and I ignored the fact that he was one of my fathers wingwipers...

Semper Fi to all our Brothers, regardless of branch.

Peter D.


Skivvie Guard Duty

MCRD San Diego, 1951, after we hand washed our skivvies, and were told by Cpl. Netterberg that if he saw any nicotine stains on them, "you will chew them out", clean skivvies were hung with tie-ties and care, and had 4-hour shifts of guard duty till dry. That was the old Corps you hear stories about.

Dick Watson
Cpl '51-'55
1266xxx
Would do it again in a heartbeat... Semper Fi


Harry T

Sgt. Grit,

The letter titled "Anti-Corps, Harry T" sent by GySgt FL Rousseau, was right on the money! In fact, I refer to that very truth in my recently completed book, EXCITEMENT: Shot At And Missed, which is at my publisher and should be in print by early Spring 2015. It is a first-hand account of the Marines of F-2-5, 1st MarDiv, as related to me by my brother, Sgt. Ken Lonn, a Section Chief of 60mm mortars and rockets in Korea, 1951-52. The book takes the reader from hometown, through boot camp and a year in Korea. Here is an excerpt dealing with the President's desire to eliminate the Marine Corps.

-----

"Because of President Truman's personal dislike for the United States Marine Corps, and guided by his Cabinet and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Marine Corps was slashed from a peak strength of 485,833** officers and enlisted at the end of that war to a total Corps strength of only 74,279. The Administration and its Army advisors had concluded that the Marine Corps would no longer be needed. This was strongly stated by Truman's Secretary of Defense, Louis A. Johnson, to Admiral Richard L. Connally in 1949, to whit, "We'll never have any more amphibious operations. That does away with the Marine Corps. And the Air Force can do anything the Navy can do nowadays, so that does away with the Navy."

The Second World War had been won! Marines had fought with determination, bravery and tenacity. And the thanks they got was; 'Take a hike! Your services are no longer needed! Don't let the door hit you in the b-tt as you leave!' That was not exactly the 'thank you' the heroes of Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Iwo Jima and Okinawa expected.

But when the conflict erupted in Korea, the leadership in Washington DC soon came to realize that the nation did, indeed, still need its 'soldiers of the sea', because in the early days of what became known as the Korean War, the outcome was looking very bleak. In fact, by the end of July, the situation was very much in doubt for the U.N. forces. With the Army clinging desperately to its small perimeter at the southwest end of the Korean peninsula, the Marine Corps was ordered to send troops to the battle zone – immediately! Yeah, right!"

-----

I'll let you and your readers know when the book will be available.

Semper Fi
Bob Lonn​


Regarding Harry,

Harry was not against the Corps, he wanted to combine all services! Check your history, he fired the "God" of the Army in Korea! We need more Harry Trumans!

Darrell "Gene" Cordes
Sgt. "Old Corps"​


Olde Salt Colleagues

I owe a sincere apology to Daniel Flynn; shortly after I forwarded the below response to his posting, I began hearing an echoing refrain in my brainless housing group: "Battle jacket, battle jacket, battle jacket." I contacted two of my olde salt colleagues and put the question to them, and they both, independently responded that my future was destined to be an occupant of a nursing home for olde folks. Incidentally, there were also kahki style Battle jackets (I have photos of my brother June, 25 1950, where he is wearing one at the Marine Reserve Battalion out of 'Boston, MA - he and his unit coincidentally were that very day on the way to Camp Lejeune for summer training when the North Koreans invaded South Korea; that two week training went on for two more years).

Will Clifford
Capt., USMC (Ret)
CWO-3


Product Of The Depression

Sgt. Grit,

A Career in Navy/Marine Corps Meals. I got thinking about the meals I have had in Navy and Marine Corps Mess Halls. The most remembered was the beans for Breakfast on Wednesday and Sundays mornings in Navy Mess Halls during World War II. Aboard ship, we Marines ate the same thing as the Sailors.

I am a product of the Depression, when some times we didn't get all the things we needed for Breakfast. Most breakfast were Oatmeal probably because it was the cheapest meal to prepare and the most nutritious.

Entering the Mess Halls were not the same as eating at home. You line up according to your Platoon schedule, then with your DI rushing you through the chow line so he could get back on schedule with your training. At Treasure Island, during WWII they had recalled two Old CPO's that were at least in their seventies and they ran the Mess Hall Lines which were constant from Dawn and Before. After Boot camp came (from my point of view, cause I was loaded aboard ship soon after) ship board food. Some great and some forgetful. "C" Ration Breakfasts, Lunches and Dinners were the norm, with long lines waiting at your designated mess hall entrance, sometimes getting in line for Lunch after Breakfast because there were several thousand on board the ship.​

I went from Pearl Harbor to Guam in June of 1944 arriving as the Island was Secured, so we lacked the fine meals at tables in the Mess Hall to meals made from "C" rats and served in your meat can and cover, with you sitting where ever hoping to get some of the chow before someone screamed about get moving again.

Korean War Chow wasn't much different from WWII chow, they had been working on it, BUT there were warehouses full of WWII "C's" that needed to be eaten up.

Between Wars I had been at Guard Detachments that served great food and Infantry Training that served WWII Rations, now and then some one would scream and we would have Steaks, mashed Potatoes and Gravy, just like home.

But with all the training, I was hard as a rock and hungry all the time.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


My Heart On The Line

By Frank Schaeffer
The Washington Post

Before my son became a Marine, I never thought much about who was defending me.

Now when I read of the war on terrorism or the coming conflict in Iraq, it cuts to my heart. When I see a picture of a member of our military who has been killed, I read his or her name very carefully. Sometimes I cry.

In 1999, when the barrel-chested Marine recruiter showed up in dress blues and bedazzled my son John, I did not stand in the way. John was headstrong, and he seemed to understand these stern, clean men with straight backs and flawless uniforms. I did not. I live in the Volvo-driving, higher education-worshiping North Shore of Boston. I write novels for a living. I have never served in the military.

It had been hard enough sending my two older children off to Georgetown and New York University. John's enlisting was unexpected, so deeply unsettling. I did not relish the prospect of answering the question, "So where is John going to college?" from the parents who were itching to tell me all about how their son or daughter was going to Harvard. At the private high school John attended, no other students were going into the military.

"But aren't the Marines terribly Southern?" asked one perplexed mother while standing next to me at the brunch following graduation. "What a waste, he was such a good student," said another parent. One parent (a professor at a nearby and rather famous university) spoke up at a school meeting and suggested that the school should "carefully evaluate what went wrong."

When John graduated from three months of boot camp on Parris Island, 3,000 parents and friends were on the parade deck stands. We parents and our Marines not only were of many races but also were representative of many economic classes. Many were poor. Some arrived crammed in the backs of pickups, others by bus. John told me that a lot of parents could not afford the trip.

We in the audience were white and Native American. We were Hispanic, Arab, and African American, and Asian. We were former Marines wearing the scars of battle, or at least baseball caps emblazoned with battles' names. We were Southern whites from Nashville and skinheads from New Jersey, black kids from Cleveland wearing ghetto rags and white ex-cons with ham-hock forearms defaced by jailhouse tattoos. We would not have been mistaken for the educated and well-heeled parents gathered on the lawns of John's private school a half-year before.

After graduation one new Marine told John, "Before I was a Marine, if I had ever seen you on my block I would've probably killed you just because you were standing there." This was a serious statement from one of John's good friends, a black ex-gang member from Detroit who, as John said, "would die for me now, just like I'd die for him."

My son has connected me to my country in a way that I was too selfish and insular to experience before. I feel closer to the waitress at our local diner than to some of my oldest friends. She has two sons in the Corps. They are facing the same dangers as my boy. When the guy who fixes my car asks me how John is doing, I know he means it. His younger brother is in the Navy.

Why were I and the other parents at my son's private school so surprised by his choice? During World War II, the sons and daughters of the most powerful and educated families did their bit. If the idea of the immorality of the Vietnam War was the only reason those lucky enough to go to college dodged the draft, why did we not encourage our children to volunteer for military service once that war was done?

Have we wealthy and educated Americans all become pacifists? Is the world a safe place? Or have we just gotten used to having somebody else defend us? What is the future of our democracy when the sons and daughters of the janitors at our elite universities are far more likely to be put in harm's way than are any of the students whose dorms their parents clean?

I feel shame because it took my son's joining the Marine Corps to make me take notice of who is defending me. I feel hope because perhaps my son is part of a future "greatest generation." As the storm clouds of war gather, at least I know that I can look the men and women in uniform in the eye.

My son is one of them. He is the best I have to offer. He is my heart.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #2)

It was getting late and I wanted to see my bedroom - and the new furniture my parents had purchased for me. Mom asked if I wanted anything more to eat before we went upstairs. My answer was "No!" We went upstairs. They showed me their room. They had gotten a new king size bed - but most of their furniture was that which they had for years. They showed me the other two rooms on that floor. They were to be for guests and had all new furniture - a king size bed in one and twin beds in the other. My Mom must have had a ball when shopping for furniture. Then we went into my room. I could hardly believe my eyes when she flipped on the lights. It was beautiful. I gave them hugs when I saw it. All of these rooms were the same size - quite large - about 12 x 20 feet. They said that those on the 3rd floor were the same. The only difference was the height of the ceilings - 10 ft. on the 2nd floor and 8 ft. on the 3rd. My bed was a queen size and made me think of sometime sharing it with the love of my life, Mary. The rest of the furniture was quite masculine and appropriate for a Marine Sergeant. I thanked them over and over. I went into a bathroom, took a shower and got ready to turn in for the night. Boy did I sleep - until my usual wake up time - 0500. When we lived on the farm that was the time that everyone was up and my parents had not gotten out of the habit.

They were in one bathroom while I was in the other - and we all went downstairs together. We went into the kitchen so Mom could prepare breakfast. Dad said that he was going to take the Oldsmobile to Anderson Olds for a complete check-up and he doubted that he would be back for lunch. He asked if I would like to ride along. I declined. I told him I wanted to talk with my Mom. After Mom had done the dishes we went into the living room. She said "I understand you wanted to talk with me?" I said "Yes. We have to talk." She was both attentive and puzzled. I went on "As they say, I am now free, white and twenty one. Do you know what 'Platonic' means?" She replied "I never heard the word. How is it spelled?" That didn't surprise me. I said "Capital 'P'-l-a-t-o-n-i-c. You can look it up in the dictionary or the Book of Knowledge later. But I will tell you what it means right now. A 'Platonic relationship' or 'Platonic lifestyle' means a love that is devoid of or without sexual relations... Are you with me so far?" She said "Yes, I am with you. Continue." I continued "Mary and I have been going steady for more than four years - and we are very much in love with each other. And it is our choice to live a Platonic lifestyle - until we are married... Do you understand that so far?" She said "I think that is commendable. I am glad to hear that." I told her "It is also our choice to 'sleep together' at various times. You are a Christian Scientist by choice and Mary's parents are Quakers by choice and they are aware of our choice to live a 'Platonic lifestyle' - and permit us to 'sleep together' in their home. And I expect you to permit us to do the same here. I know this may be a shock to you - and your way of thinking - but I want you to think this over carefully before you say anything. I will be leaving for Camp Lejeune at 7:00 PM. There is no hurry for a decision. I do not expect to see Mary again before Thanksgiving weekend. But I would like to have her stay with me for a day or two that weekend. I will be staying with her at her house for part of that weekend. PLEASE, I hope you can accept this. Now, How about you and I going out for lunch - and I will not take 'No' for an answer. Dad doesn't expect to be back for lunch."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

I've been following the tracking of a package I ordered. We have a present thief in our neighborhood, so I want to keep a close eye on when it arrives. My son was concerned that the package would get stolen. I told him not to worry because it is a Marine Corps bear and if anyone tried to steal him, the bear would kick his b-tt!

Rita Larson


Quotes

"There can be no greater error than to expect, or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation. 'Tis an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard."
--George Washington


"Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure."
--Thomas Jefferson


They told (us) to open up the Embassy, or "we'll blow you away." And then they looked up and saw the Marines on the roof with these really big guns, and they said in Somali, "Igaralli ahow," which means "Excuse me, I didn't mean it, my mistake."
--Karen Aquilar, in the U.S. Embassy; Mogadishu, Somalia, 1991


"For over 221 years our Corps has done two things for this great Nation. We make Marines, and we win battles."
--Gen. Charles C. Krulak, USMC (CMC); 5 May 1997


"It is mostly a matter of wills. Whose will is going to break first? Ours or the enemy's?"
--General James Mattis


"You people are making me very unhappy! Just because the sand fleas get in your noses and your ears and crawl down your necks, you clowns think you have the right to kill them. I don't care how much they bite, you will pretend that you do not feel it!

Do you hear me?

"Yes, sir!"

"You can slap a sand flea in the jungle and if the enemy sees you slap or hears you move, you'll be dead before you get your hand down. You can knock a bug off your shoulder and be dead before that bug hits the deck."

"Still wandering around on the DMZ" every night!

God Bless the American Dream!
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 11 DEC 14

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 11 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• Glad I Didn't Go Into Combat
• Old Corps
• Anti-Corps Harry T

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Marine veteran sitting with Santa in a 2013 Sgt Grit Christmas Shirt

Hey we recently got Santa's approval on a shirt I am sure you will recognize!

Gunny's Place

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Glad I Didn't Go Into Combat

Referring to Jerry D's letter about combat; when I entered our proud service I thought I would be humping some where in the world, I guess that's what all eighteen year old kids would think or I could be wrong. I to am glad that I didn't go into combat. I lucked out being in Motor T. I did get a chance to go on a patrol some where I think was north of Camp Books. So, I guess that was the closest I got to being in combat. Had we gotten into a situation and I did fail we went on a sweep and saw a Huey in action and a C-130, or it was called Puff the Magic Dragon, or Spooky. Whatever you wanted to call the plane, getting down to it, I'm glad I was not in combat, and then I wish I was. I guess fate had another plan for me from the rear.

Vic DeLeon
Semper Fi


Marines Under Armour Fleece Sweatpant


Breaking News

Santa's Osprey from Facebook Post

This image was posted this week on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page. The image, taken by a Marine Corps Combat Photographer, displays an MV-22 Osprey preparing to take flight. The text on the image reads "You're not going to believe this sh-t, but... Word around Marine Corps Air Stations this year is that Santa retired his reindeer, put his sleigh in storage, and got himself an MV-22 Osprey! No more Ho! Ho! Ho! Santa's new slogan: Out-friggin'-standing! Told you that you wouldn't believe this sh-t."

Here are a few of the comments left by our fans.


Miriam G. - That's awesome. I can't Wait for Christmas Eve so I can stay up and watch Santa's new MV-22 Osprey. I am sure the reindeer will be flying in comfort with Santa. A Merry Christmas to all.


Dwaine G. - Just be glad it isn't an A-10 Wart Hog.


Karen S. - H-LL YEAH! That is the most AWESOME military aircraft since the FIRST Stealth Bomber! OOOHRAH! MAN!


Ronetta M. - There's a big Osprey in Christmas lights at the Bell plant in Amarillo. Santa's at the helm!


Roger P. - He still needs Rudolph to guide his bird, though. Through fog, clouds, and smog. As for the other reindeer, well, venison for our fellow Marines in combat zones.


MV-22 Osprey with rednose like Rudolph

Skeeter S.


Read more of the comments left on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Vietnam Watch with Rubber Strap


Old Corps

Dear Sgt. Grit,

I am an active member of the Lofton Henderson Detachment of the Marine Corps League in Lorain, Ohio. I have read all the ridiculous arguments for the distinctions between "Old" and "New" Corps. I graduated in June of 1954 and enlisted in 1955. Not only were Women Marines a separate organization, we had our own Director. I went in under the double banner from the head of the eagle, and, so far as I am concerned, that is truly the OLD CORPS. If any Marine enlisted under that depiction they are Old Corps, otherwise, if they enlisted under the single banner, they're New Corps. Check with Sgt. Grit (not that he's an expert on the situation)... but he has a mug labeled OLD CORPS, and it has the double banner on the emblem.

Pfc. Autumn Day


Me Looking Important

Gunny Rousseau on train in Korea

Sgt. Grit,

During the Korean War, damaged equipment (Tanks, Truck, Weapons Carriers and such) had to be taken to Combat Service Group about a hundred Miles behind the lines. But just getting on the lines was the only pleasant part of the deal. Tent with heat, bunk beds and Fresh hot Chow. Sometimes stopping enroute and getting a meal at an Army or Air Force Post where the food was served at tables with checkered table cloths and Pretty Korean Maidens. Of course the terrible part of the ordeal was the dirt, smoke and dust that covered you. But as you can see at the bottom of the locomotive is a pipe where steam comes out. So you put your "C" rations in an expeditionary can, pull the can up the steam pipe and have the engineer turn on the steam for just a moment or two... VOILA... Hot Chow.

Here I am at the controls of a stopped train with the engineers on top and me looking important.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


The Surprise

The Surprise

Wife surprises Marine returning from Afghanistan. A surprise reunion following a year-long separation from loved ones can overwhelm even the most disciplined, battle-hardened Marine with emotion.


Anti-Corps Harry T

Sgt. Grit,

At the end of World War II there were Several Attempts to get Rid of Our MARINE CORPS (There were attempts prior to this but nothing of consequence). Our President Harry S. Truman was an Army Captian that served in France during World War I, but something Happened in World War I that made the U. S. Army quite mad at the Marine Corps.

A Chicago Tribune Reporter by the name of Floyd Gibbons reported the Story of Belleau Wood, of the Bravery of the Marines that dug out the Germans and won a Battle Hard Fought. Harry Truman fought in that Battle as did other members of the U.S. Army but Floyd Gibbon, who Lost an eye during the Battle wrote a Story that was picked up by most news papers in the US. The Chicago Trib. story was the most News Worthy, the Marines were praised all around the Country, stories of the Marines Bravery eclipsed stories of the other Hero's in the War, Hence the Marines were Hated by most WWI Serving U.S. oldiers.

Harry gathered some Democratic Friends who were Members of the U. S. Congress and they tried to push through a Plan to rid the USA of the Marines by making all Armed Forces of the USA the "United States Armed Forces" no more Army, Navy, Air Force or Marines, just the "United States Armed Forces". Well Congress put the Kabosh to that in a hurry. The Delightful part of this Story comes about a year Later.

The North Korean Army Crossed the 38th Parallel requiring the Commanding General to call for the only U.S. Armed Force that could do the Job. General MacArthur called President Harry Truman and asked for a Brigade of Marines.

After World War 2, the U.S. Army advertised; "Join the U. S. Army and become an AMBASSADOR". Wherever the Army Went they carried no weapons. Weapons were at each Base for Arming an ARMY with "Weapons" most had never fired or fired only a few shots.

Don't believe it look it up, might take some time. I know about it because I was there, I carried a .30 Caliber Semi Automatic Rifle, M1. I was trained and was an Expert.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Lovely Summer Resort

Sgt Grit,

Graduated high school in June, 1956, enlisted July 10, 1956, a special date: Married 7/10/65, son began as midshipman, 7/10/84, heart attack, 7/10/91 Any way; arrived at Yemassee early AM with about 200 young nervous boys and was greeted by ONE Marine Corporal Military Policeman in full uniform, white helmet liner, .45 cal. pistol on hip. He continually screamed, "fall in, dress is right, an cover down". Of course we had no idea what he was talking about. I would suspect thousands of young men experienced this introduction to that lovely summer resort of Parris Island.

Corporal Rowe 1623xxx​


Perception

Marine perception of Santa Clause flying in the night sky

We posted this image to the Sgt Grit Facebook Page this week. The image displays Santa Claus flying across the night skyline with his team of reindeer. The text on the image reads "What normal people see... Santa and his reindeer. What Marines see... Flying Venison."

Here are a few of the comments left by our fans.


Miriam G. - Ok Marines those reindeers are off limits, I want my Christmas presents to get to my house.


Anthony V. - If it flies, it dies.


James P. - If it sits still... it dies too!


Rick G. - Fast food to go.


Read more of the comments left on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Make You Feel Better

I have just finished reading the story about tie-ties. I went thru Parris Island starting in July of 1961. I had forgotten about using tie-ties on wash day out back of our barracks. I also remember during the hot summer days they had green, yellow, red and black flags flying... depending on the temperature. The day the whole platoon lined up to get our medical shots... about three in each shoulder. The DI knew some of shots (like yellow fever) made you sore. So with the black flag flying, on a day when the DI's knew it was well over 100+ degrees... we were all doing extra push-ups behind the barracks. Then maybe some rifle exercises with our M1's... all this to make you feel better.

Cpl G.Bradshaw
1941xxx 1961-1967


Guadalcanal Video

Grit,

An excellent Guadalcanal video, about 15 minutes long, combining actual WWII combat footage, footage from "The Pacific" and footage from 2012.

The Tenaru (Alligator Creek)

Semper Fi
Bush


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #3)

My mother said "Where would you like to go?" I told her that "There is a very nice place not too far from here that I think you would enjoy. I have been there many times over the years and it just gets better every time we go there. I am sure you will be able to find something that you like. It's a little more upscale than the 'Cup', 'Kennedys' or 'Gardners'. Or you might prefer the Steakhouse in Mt. Holly? That was always good and they have quite a menu. Or the Red Lion Inn for something Italian? Or the Bordentown Grill?" She said "The Red Lion Inn and the Bordentown Grill are too far away." I said "I can get to either of them in less than 30 minutes. When I took Mary to Earlham we drove 75 miles to eat at the Hollyhock Hill Restaurant one evening - and she suggested going back there for breakfast the following morning - but we did not do that. The distance is not a problem - but if you wait much longer Dad will be home and maybe we can all go out to dinner." She said "I could have fixed you a nice lunch while we have been trying to decide where to go." I said "Oh, no, you don't. We're going out this time. Now where shall it be?" She said "Let's try the first place that you mentioned." I said "Okay, let's go." We headed for my Buick.

We had not gone far when she said "I have always been partial to Buicks and this is really a beautiful car. The ride is so much smoother than the Oldsmobile but Dad could not get a Buick when he got the Olds." The Hollywood Inn was only about ten minutes from the house and we were soon there. Mom liked the looks of the place even before she got out of the car. And when she stepped inside she liked it even more. The hostess led us to a booth and gave us their huge menus. Mom said "I think this place is lovely - and I love these menus. I am going to take my time when ordering." The waitress asked "What would you like to drink?" I told my Mom "Their milkshakes are fantastic - and huge. Mary and I usually share one." Mom asked the waitress for a few more minutes to decide on the drinks. The waitress said "We can split a milkshake into 2 glasses if you like." We ordered a 'Jumbo Shake' in 2 glasses and two of their special Club Sandwiches. They were huge, too. I told Mom "Take your time. There is no reason to rush." While we were eating I told my mother how Mary and I had decided to live a Platonic lifestyle. And how we slept together - as Mrs. 'B' had described it as 'beautiful'. I told her that my driving 1500 miles each weekend made it quite easy for me to sleep whenever I had the chance to do so. And Mary's hectic modeling career made it easy for her to sleep, too. Mary was 5'7" and 128 pounds, quite thin. And I was 6'2" and 178 pounds. When we were together on a sofa we didn't cover the cushions. She would lie down with her back against the back of the sofa and I would lie down facing her. I would have my arms around her body and she would have her arms around my neck. We were usually kissing when we fell into a deep sleep - and sometimes when we awoke. The 'Bs' came home one day and found us this way. They said "That is beautiful."

Happy Holidays and Semper Fi to 'You All'!

The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Marine Taking A Moment

Here we have a Marine in Afghanistan taking a moment. Caption this image.

Marine in Afghanistan taking a momemnt


Lost And Found

5th Comm Bn Christmas tree in DaNang, Vietnam

Marines of 5th Comm that were in DaNang, Vietnam

Sgt. Grit,

I am a past member of the USMC, 5th Com Bt. July 1965 through June 1966. I have attached the picture I took of the Christmas billboard 1965, a picture of our Christmas tree and a picture of the 5th Com. Btn. logo sign.

OK now you know who I am. I am interested in finding 11 other Marines that landed from Japan in DaNang in July 1965 to set up General Walt's Command Center. I have many pictures of the swamp we lived in "Dog Patch" and the area we survived in.

At age 72 I am skimpy with my time and I don't understand things like I used too. The holidays just seem to take on a life of their own.

Thank you,
Sgt. Jay Wackler 232xxx
USMC, Honorable Discharge 1966
Email: jaywackler[at]gmail.com


Reunions

Sgt. Grit,

Hoping you could put a notification in your newsletter for a reunion of Charlie Battery 1-12, 1965-1969. Washington DC on June 17-21.

Contact: Bruce Parker

Cell: (248) 310-8195

Email: Bparker[at]kreher.com


Taps

Please be advised that Frank P. Keller Sr. (4th Marines, 23rd Regiment, 2nd Battalion, E Company) survivor of Iwo Jima, passed away on Nov. 2, 2014. Corporal Keller served under Lt. Drizin along with 13 other Marines on what has come to be known as the "lost patrol". RIP Marine.

Frank P. Keller


It has been a truly wonderful experience shopping with Sgt. Grit these past years, one I will always look back on fondly.

However, my own precious Marine passed away today after a lengthy, drawn out combination of illnesses, and my heart is very heavy with sadness in losing my soul mate. He always looked forward to receiving your catalogs for new items he knew we would most likely order which we did.

I hope you will understand the very great loss I feel and will honor my unsubscribing.

Thank you,

SEMPER FI!

Mrs. Barbara XXXXX
Honored wife of Lance Corporal Richard XXXXX
2nd Batt/7th Marines
Viet Nam Vet
US Marine Corps 1966-1969


Short Rounds

From the early days. Catalog has changed considerably. Cpl Michael Davis retired from Fox Btry, 2/14 as a 1st Sgt. He was kind enough to share this picture and memory with me.

Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

Old Sgt Grit Catalog


An awesome poem by John Wayne.

"The Sky"


US Marines were referred to as the "Black Death" by enemy combatants in the battle of Fallujah in '04. Appropriately, the song 'The Man Comes Around' tells of the Apocalypse of the Revelation of St. John. This video is dedicated to the men who have been wounded and killed during their service to the Corps.

Semper Fi. -Inspired by Generation Kill-

When The Marines Come Around - By Johnny Cash


Clarence Milster. I enlisted in the summer of 1955 and was issued utilities. Have never heard of dungarees as a Marine Corps item of clothing. The Navy wore dungarees.

Paul S. Murtha, Sgt USMC
JUNE '55 To June 1960​


It was good to be updated about the base at Edenton, NC. Sixty years is a long time ago, I am wondering if MACS 5 is still active. Sully, if I recall the good liberty was in Elizabeth City, with the Navy from Norfolk, VA. Went on line to see what is what in Edenton, all I could say is the town grew up. My thanks for the interest to respond. Extending good wishes for the up coming holidays to you.

Robert P Nowicki (Ski)
Semper Fi​


Received my "Battle or Field Jacket" as we called it in 1947 when I enlisted in the USMC. I'm 85 and I still can zip it up.

CWO4 William A Cimbalo, Retired


On 3 October 1958, Plt 347, 3rdBn, P.I., we called them utilities.

Bill McDermott


Tell the Marine who wanted to learn more about the use of Dobermans on Guam to get a copy of the book "Always Faithful" by Wm. Putney.

Semper Fi,
Bob Rader #140xxxx


There is a memorial to those dogs who served in WWII on Guam. I found that info in a coffee table book entitled "A Day in the Life of the Military" (I could be wrong about the title) that came out several years ago.

James V. Merl
1655xxx


Quotes

"'Tis well."
--George Washington, last words, 14 December 1799


"Were we directed from Washington when to sow, and when to reap, we should soon want bread."
--Thomas Jefferson


"The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!"
--Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, 1945


"Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem."
--Ronald Reagan, President of the United States; 1985


"Sad will be the day when the American people forget their traditions and their history, and no longer remember that the country they love, the institutions they cherish, and the freedom they hope to preserve, were born from the throes of armed resistance to tyranny, and nursed in the rugged arms of fearless men."
--Roger Sherman, signer of the Declaration of Independence


"Marines I see as two breeds, Rottweilers or Dobermans, because Marines come in two varieties, big and mean, or skinny and mean. They're aggressive on the attack and tenacious on defense. They've got really short hair and they always go for the throat."
--RAdm. "Jay" R. Stark, USN; 10 November 1995


"We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States or America."
--Constitution of the United States


"Least amphibious of all the Corps' major installations, Two-Niner Trees."

"Every day is a Holiday, Every meal is a Banquet."

"You silly people think you're tired, do you?"
"Yes, sir!"
"Well, I've got news. You're gonna practice to be tireder!"

Gung Ho!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 11 DEC 14
If you are having trouble viewing this issue, see it on our website:
http://www.grunt.com/corps/newsletter/10342/

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 11 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• Glad I Didn't Go Into Combat
• Old Corps
• Anti-Corps Harry T

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

Flags   Family Member   Ka-Bars   Auto   Headgear  Jackets  ALL CATEGORIES  

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Hey we recently got Santa's approval on a shirt I am sure you will recognize!

Gunny's Place

Get Sgt Grit's 2014 Christmas Shirts:

2014 Sgt Grit Exclusive Christmas Santa Long
Sleeve T-Shirt

2014 Sgt Grit Exclusive Bulldog T-Shirt


Glad I Didn't Go Into Combat

Referring to Jerry D's letter about combat; when I entered our proud service I thought I would be humping some where in the world, I guess that's what all eighteen year old kids would think or I could be wrong. I to am glad that I didn't go into combat. I lucked out being in Motor T. I did get a chance to go on a patrol some where I think was north of Camp Books. So, I guess that was the closest I got to being in combat. Had we gotten into a situation and I did fail we went on a sweep and saw a Huey in action and a C-130, or it was called Puff the Magic Dragon, or Spooky. Whatever you wanted to call the plane, getting down to it, I'm glad I was not in combat, and then I wish I was. I guess fate had another plan for me from the rear.

Vic DeLeon
Semper Fi


Breaking News

This image was posted this week on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page. The image, taken by a Marine Corps Combat Photographer, displays an MV-22 Osprey preparing to take flight. The text on the image reads "You're not going to believe this sh-t, but... Word around Marine Corps Air Stations this year is that Santa retired his reindeer, put his sleigh in storage, and got himself an MV-22 Osprey! No more Ho! Ho! Ho! Santa's new slogan: Out-friggin'-standing! Told you that you wouldn't believe this sh-t."

Here are a few of the comments left by our fans.


Miriam G. - That's awesome. I can't Wait for Christmas Eve so I can stay up and watch Santa's new MV-22 Osprey. I am sure the reindeer will be flying in comfort with Santa. A Merry Christmas to all.


Dwaine G. - Just be glad it isn't an A-10 Wart Hog.


Karen S. - H-LL YEAH! That is the most AWESOME military aircraft since the FIRST Stealth Bomber! OOOHRAH! MAN!


Ronetta M. - There's a big Osprey in Christmas lights at the Bell plant in Amarillo. Santa's at the helm!


Roger P. - He still needs Rudolph to guide his bird, though. Through fog, clouds, and smog. As for the other reindeer, well, venison for our fellow Marines in combat zones.


Read more of the comments left on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Old Corps

Dear Sgt. Grit,

I am an active member of the Lofton Henderson Detachment of the Marine Corps League in Lorain, Ohio. I have read all the ridiculous arguments for the distinctions between "Old" and "New" Corps. I graduated in June of 1954 and enlisted in 1955. Not only were Women Marines a separate organization, we had our own Director. I went in under the double banner from the head of the eagle, and, so far as I am concerned, that is truly the OLD CORPS. If any Marine enlisted under that depiction they are Old Corps, otherwise, if they enlisted under the single banner, they're New Corps. Check with Sgt. Grit (not that he's an expert on the situation)... but he has a mug labeled OLD CORPS, and it has the double banner on the emblem.

Pfc. Autumn Day


Me Looking Important

Sgt. Grit,

During the Korean War, damaged equipment (Tanks, Truck, Weapons Carriers and such) had to be taken to Combat Service Group about a hundred Miles behind the lines. But just getting on the lines was the only pleasant part of the deal. Tent with heat, bunk beds and Fresh hot Chow. Sometimes stopping enroute and getting a meal at an Army or Air Force Post where the food was served at tables with checkered table cloths and Pretty Korean Maidens. Of course the terrible part of the ordeal was the dirt, smoke and dust that covered you. But as you can see at the bottom of the locomotive is a pipe where steam comes out. So you put your "C" rations in an expeditionary can, pull the can up the steam pipe and have the engineer turn on the steam for just a moment or two... VOILA... Hot Chow.

Here I am at the controls of a stopped train with the engineers on top and me looking important.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


The Surprise

Wife surprises Marine returning from Afghanistan. A surprise reunion following a year-long separation from loved ones can overwhelm even the most disciplined, battle-hardened Marine with emotion.


Anti-Corps Harry T

Sgt. Grit,

At the end of World War II there were Several Attempts to get Rid of Our MARINE CORPS (There were attempts prior to this but nothing of consequence). Our President Harry S. Truman was an Army Captian that served in France during World War I, but something Happened in World War I that made the U. S. Army quite mad at the Marine Corps.

A Chicago Tribune Reporter by the name of Floyd Gibbons reported the Story of Belleau Wood, of the Bravery of the Marines that dug out the Germans and won a Battle Hard Fought. Harry Truman fought in that Battle as did other members of the U.S. Army but Floyd Gibbon, who Lost an eye during the Battle wrote a Story that was picked up by most news papers in the US. The Chicago Trib. story was the most News Worthy, the Marines were praised all around the Country, stories of the Marines Bravery eclipsed stories of the other Hero's in the War, Hence the Marines were Hated by most WWI Serving U.S. oldiers.

Harry gathered some Democratic Friends who were Members of the U. S. Congress and they tried to push through a Plan to rid the USA of the Marines by making all Armed Forces of the USA the "United States Armed Forces" no more Army, Navy, Air Force or Marines, just the "United States Armed Forces". Well Congress put the Kabosh to that in a hurry. The Delightful part of this Story comes about a year Later.

The North Korean Army Crossed the 38th Parallel requiring the Commanding General to call for the only U.S. Armed Force that could do the Job. General MacArthur called President Harry Truman and asked for a Brigade of Marines.

After World War 2, the U.S. Army advertised; "Join the U. S. Army and become an AMBASSADOR". Wherever the Army Went they carried no weapons. Weapons were at each Base for Arming an ARMY with "Weapons" most had never fired or fired only a few shots.

Don't believe it look it up, might take some time. I know about it because I was there, I carried a .30 Caliber Semi Automatic Rifle, M1. I was trained and was an Expert.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Lovely Summer Resort

Sgt Grit,

Graduated high school in June, 1956, enlisted July 10, 1956, a special date: Married 7/10/65, son began as midshipman, 7/10/84, heart attack, 7/10/91 Any way; arrived at Yemassee early AM with about 200 young nervous boys and was greeted by ONE Marine Corporal Military Policeman in full uniform, white helmet liner, .45 cal. pistol on hip. He continually screamed, "fall in, dress is right, an cover down". Of course we had no idea what he was talking about. I would suspect thousands of young men experienced this introduction to that lovely summer resort of Parris Island.

Corporal Rowe 1623xxx​


Perception

We posted this image to the Sgt Grit Facebook Page this week. The image displays Santa Claus flying across the night skyline with his team of reindeer. The text on the image reads "What normal people see... Santa and his reindeer. What Marines see... Flying Venison."

Here are a few of the comments left by our fans.


Miriam G. - Ok Marines those reindeers are off limits, I want my Christmas presents to get to my house.


Anthony V. - If it flies, it dies.


James P. - If it sits still... it dies too!


Rick G. - Fast food to go.


Read more of the comments left on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Make You Feel Better

I have just finished reading the story about tie-ties. I went thru Parris Island starting in July of 1961. I had forgotten about using tie-ties on wash day out back of our barracks. I also remember during the hot summer days they had green, yellow, red and black flags flying... depending on the temperature. The day the whole platoon lined up to get our medical shots... about three in each shoulder. The DI knew some of shots (like yellow fever) made you sore. So with the black flag flying, on a day when the DI's knew it was well over 100+ degrees... we were all doing extra push-ups behind the barracks. Then maybe some rifle exercises with our M1's... all this to make you feel better.

Cpl G.Bradshaw
1941xxx 1961-1967


Guadalcanal Video

Grit,

An excellent Guadalcanal video, about 15 minutes long, combining actual WWII combat footage, footage from "The Pacific" and footage from 2012.

The Tenaru (Alligator Creek)

Semper Fi
Bush


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #3)

My mother said "Where would you like to go?" I told her that "There is a very nice place not too far from here that I think you would enjoy. I have been there many times over the years and it just gets better every time we go there. I am sure you will be able to find something that you like. It's a little more upscale than the 'Cup', 'Kennedys' or 'Gardners'. Or you might prefer the Steakhouse in Mt. Holly? That was always good and they have quite a menu. Or the Red Lion Inn for something Italian? Or the Bordentown Grill?" She said "The Red Lion Inn and the Bordentown Grill are too far away." I said "I can get to either of them in less than 30 minutes. When I took Mary to Earlham we drove 75 miles to eat at the Hollyhock Hill Restaurant one evening - and she suggested going back there for breakfast the following morning - but we did not do that. The distance is not a problem - but if you wait much longer Dad will be home and maybe we can all go out to dinner." She said "I could have fixed you a nice lunch while we have been trying to decide where to go." I said "Oh, no, you don't. We're going out this time. Now where shall it be?" She said "Let's try the first place that you mentioned." I said "Okay, let's go." We headed for my Buick.

We had not gone far when she said "I have always been partial to Buicks and this is really a beautiful car. The ride is so much smoother than the Oldsmobile but Dad could not get a Buick when he got the Olds." The Hollywood Inn was only about ten minutes from the house and we were soon there. Mom liked the looks of the place even before she got out of the car. And when she stepped inside she liked it even more. The hostess led us to a booth and gave us their huge menus. Mom said "I think this place is lovely - and I love these menus. I am going to take my time when ordering." The waitress asked "What would you like to drink?" I told my Mom "Their milkshakes are fantastic - and huge. Mary and I usually share one." Mom asked the waitress for a few more minutes to decide on the drinks. The waitress said "We can split a milkshake into 2 glasses if you like." We ordered a 'Jumbo Shake' in 2 glasses and two of their special Club Sandwiches. They were huge, too. I told Mom "Take your time. There is no reason to rush." While we were eating I told my mother how Mary and I had decided to live a Platonic lifestyle. And how we slept together - as Mrs. 'B' had described it as 'beautiful'. I told her that my driving 1500 miles each weekend made it quite easy for me to sleep whenever I had the chance to do so. And Mary's hectic modeling career made it easy for her to sleep, too. Mary was 5'7" and 128 pounds, quite thin. And I was 6'2" and 178 pounds. When we were together on a sofa we didn't cover the cushions. She would lie down with her back against the back of the sofa and I would lie down facing her. I would have my arms around her body and she would have her arms around my neck. We were usually kissing when we fell into a deep sleep - and sometimes when we awoke. The 'Bs' came home one day and found us this way. They said "That is beautiful."

Happy Holidays and Semper Fi to 'You All'!

The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Lost And Found

Sgt. Grit,

I am a past member of the USMC, 5th Com Bt. July 1965 through June 1966. I have attached the picture I took of the Christmas billboard 1965, a picture of our Christmas tree and a picture of the 5th Com. Btn. logo sign.

OK now you know who I am. I am interested in finding 11 other Marines that landed from Japan in DaNang in July 1965 to set up General Walt's Command Center. I have many pictures of the swamp we lived in "Dog Patch" and the area we survived in.

At age 72 I am skimpy with my time and I don't understand things like I used too. The holidays just seem to take on a life of their own.

Thank you,
Sgt. Jay Wackler 232xxx
USMC, Honorable Discharge 1966
Email: jaywackler[at]gmail.com


Reunions

Sgt. Grit,

Hoping you could put a notification in your newsletter for a reunion of Charlie Battery 1-12, 1965-1969. Washington DC on June 17-21.

Contact: Bruce Parker

Cell: (248) 310-8195

Email: Bparker[at]kreher.com


Taps

Please be advised that Frank P. Keller Sr. (4th Marines, 23rd Regiment, 2nd Battalion, E Company) survivor of Iwo Jima, passed away on Nov. 2, 2014. Corporal Keller served under Lt. Drizin along with 13 other Marines on what has come to be known as the "lost patrol". RIP Marine.

Frank P. Keller


It has been a truly wonderful experience shopping with Sgt. Grit these past years, one I will always look back on fondly.

However, my own precious Marine passed away today after a lengthy, drawn out combination of illnesses, and my heart is very heavy with sadness in losing my soul mate. He always looked forward to receiving your catalogs for new items he knew we would most likely order which we did.

I hope you will understand the very great loss I feel and will honor my unsubscribing.

Thank you,

SEMPER FI!

Mrs. Barbara XXXXX
Honored wife of Lance Corporal Richard XXXXX
2nd Batt/7th Marines
Viet Nam Vet
US Marine Corps 1966-1969


Short Rounds

From the early days. Catalog has changed considerably. Cpl Michael Davis retired from Fox Btry, 2/14 as a 1st Sgt. He was kind enough to share this picture and memory with me.

Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit


An awesome poem by John Wayne.

"The Sky"


US Marines were referred to as the "Black Death" by enemy combatants in the battle of Fallujah in '04. Appropriately, the song 'The Man Comes Around' tells of the Apocalypse of the Revelation of St. John. This video is dedicated to the men who have been wounded and killed during their service to the Corps.

Semper Fi. -Inspired by Generation Kill-

When The Marines Come Around - By Johnny Cash


Clarence Milster. I enlisted in the summer of 1955 and was issued utilities. Have never heard of dungarees as a Marine Corps item of clothing. The Navy wore dungarees.

Paul S. Murtha, Sgt USMC
JUNE '55 To June 1960​


It was good to be updated about the base at Edenton, NC. Sixty years is a long time ago, I am wondering if MACS 5 is still active. Sully, if I recall the good liberty was in Elizabeth City, with the Navy from Norfolk, VA. Went on line to see what is what in Edenton, all I could say is the town grew up. My thanks for the interest to respond. Extending good wishes for the up coming holidays to you.

Robert P Nowicki (Ski)
Semper Fi​


Received my "Battle or Field Jacket" as we called it in 1947 when I enlisted in the USMC. I'm 85 and I still can zip it up.

CWO4 William A Cimbalo, Retired


On 3 October 1958, Plt 347, 3rdBn, P.I., we called them utilities.

Bill McDermott


Tell the Marine who wanted to learn more about the use of Dobermans on Guam to get a copy of the book "Always Faithful" by Wm. Putney.

Semper Fi,
Bob Rader #140xxxx


There is a memorial to those dogs who served in WWII on Guam. I found that info in a coffee table book entitled "A Day in the Life of the Military" (I could be wrong about the title) that came out several years ago.

James V. Merl
1655xxx


Quotes

"'Tis well."
--George Washington, last words, 14 December 1799


"Were we directed from Washington when to sow, and when to reap, we should soon want bread."
--Thomas Jefferson


"The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!"
--Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, 1945


"Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem."
--Ronald Reagan, President of the United States; 1985


"Sad will be the day when the American people forget their traditions and their history, and no longer remember that the country they love, the institutions they cherish, and the freedom they hope to preserve, were born from the throes of armed resistance to tyranny, and nursed in the rugged arms of fearless men."
--Roger Sherman, signer of the Declaration of Independence


"Marines I see as two breeds, Rottweilers or Dobermans, because Marines come in two varieties, big and mean, or skinny and mean. They're aggressive on the attack and tenacious on defense. They've got really short hair and they always go for the throat."
--RAdm. "Jay" R. Stark, USN; 10 November 1995


"We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States or America."
--Constitution of the United States


"Least amphibious of all the Corps' major installations, Two-Niner Trees."

"Every day is a Holiday, Every meal is a Banquet."

"You silly people think you're tired, do you?"
"Yes, sir!"
"Well, I've got news. You're gonna practice to be tireder!"

Gung Ho!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 04 DEC 2014

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 04 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• The Only Japanese American
• Battle For Okinawa
• Proper Honors For A Marine

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Cpl Seitz wearing his jacket from Sgt Grit's

I wore this jacket at a Veteran's Day function in Amherst, Ohio, and received many compliments and requests for the vendor's address. I could hardly refuse, and gladly gave it to them. I hope many responded. It seems that everywhere I go, I get many compliments about it. Thank You very much.

Semper Fi,
George Seitz
Cpl, 1962-1967

Get the highlighted jacket at:

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USMC Black/Digital Desert Twill Jacket


The Only Japanese American

Sgt Grit,

When I joined the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, in Sept 1959, I did not know what I was in for. Being the only Japanese American in the entire 1stMarDiv., it was scary. Then I met the Old Corps Marines. The Battalion 1st SGT was a Marine Raider, many of the senior Staff NCO's and Officers were veterans of many of the major battles of the Pacific and Korea. For some reason, these Marines took a liking to me and told me stories of the Pacific war/Korea they participated in. To this day, I still remember their stories as if it was yesterday. I am proud to have met these Old Corps Marines. They and my Battalion Commander, LtCol K. J. Houghton, made me the effective leader that I would become in the Marines and later in civilian life. Many of these Marines have are gone now, but what they taught me, I taught other Marines and people that worked for me for 27 years in civilian life. You never forget those that came before and after you. So Marines, teach and train your Marines and continue the legacy. Semper Fi.

Sgt Ted K. Shimono
1959-1968


Embroidered Eagle, Globe & Anchor Hooded Zip Up Heavyweight Sweatshirt


Battle For Okinawa

Suicide boats used by the Japanese during the Battle for Okinawa

Sgt. Grit,

During the Battle for Okinawa most Marines are aware that the Japanese used Suicide (Hari Kari) planes against us. But there was more, they used Suicide Boats against us also. Inclosed is a picture of the suicide boats. Some boats had Ford and Chevrolet engines in them. They were not effective for lots of reasons, we had PT Boats and other types of patrol craft that kept them from being very effective, as soon as they began their run the PT boats were on them. There were problems with this idea on stopping the Hari Kari Boats also, some were armed with two depth charges, which went off at shallow depths which could cause damage to nearby ships and serious injury and death to American and Allied Personel.

Among other exciting things they intended to us​e against the Invasion Forces were Swimmers, that had explosives attached to themselves and could damage a ship, their purpose was to put explosives on the ships screw which would prevent the ship from moving but I saw ships screws turning from time to time which would make it difficult for a swimmer to attach anything to the screw.

And when we Arrived in Japan after they surrendered there were hundreds of tunnels dug into the hills with tracks coming from them where suicide boats could be launched (we could still see the tunnels when we went to Korea, stopping at Japan). The Invasion of Japan according to Naval Intelligence at the time, would cause nearly a million casualties (both American, Allied and Japanese).

Many of us that were preparing for the invasion of Japan, expected it to be our last day on Earth. Even a friend who was a Gunner on a B25, expected he wouldn't live through the invasion of Japan. All this information will be in books about our preparation of the Invasion of Japan but little thought will be given to the thousands of ships and thousands of men that were there, the thoughts and the letters that were not mailed because the writer lived through the Invasion.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Nothing Bad Happened To Me That Day

I was at 'Hollywood' boot camp in 1964. About a week before Thanksgiving my girlfriend sent a letter and enclosed a piece of Juicy Fruit gum. The DI felt it during mail call and made me open the letter. (a few weeks before a stick of Clark's Teaberry gum got through detected) I had to go outside and do squat thrusts in the sand pit until the flavor was gone. Although I chewed like mad the flavor remained when he appeared after about 5 minutes. I relied "Sir, Yes sir," when I was asked if the flavor was gone. He replied "Bulls---, maggot. Keep going." The second time he came out he told me to get my bayonet and give the gum a proper burial among the Ice Plant. The next time he was on duty was the day before Thanksgiving. My youngest sister had sent a birthday card that was embossed. The DI felt it and remembering the gum made me open it. When he saw what it was he asked me how old I was going to be and when? With all the proper 'Sir's' in place I revealed I was going to be 18 on Thanksgiving.

The next day was a holiday for most people, but in boot camp everyone knows, it was just another day in training. Lined up before the evening meal I heard the Senior DI calling out for me to report to the front where he stood. I got my b-tt up there as fast as I could, not knowing what the heck was going on. He told me to get in the front of the line. As we entered the mess hall for our Thanksgiving feast he walked along side of me and told the kp recruits to give me more turkey, mashed potatoes, and an extra dessert. My mind kept racing over and over as to what calamity was going to happen later. After the meal and in formation to march back to our area the DI walked up to me and wished me a Happy Birthday. That evening was just an easy evening of spit polishing our dress shoes for graduation that was quickly approaching and polishing our brass. Nothing bad happened to me that day.

Phil Bennink, Sgt '64-'68


Vietnam Black Cover/Hat


Life Was Good Then

I remember those who got PFC out of boot camp and it was one, who was the honor guide whose name was Hill. 1958, plt 231, 2nd bn., MCRD. I spent two years in the Corps before I was promoted to PFC. Then the next 7 years I had 7 promotion warrants, up and down. Would not have changed it for the world. Life was good then, I call it my p-ss and vinegar days.

Robert D Gordon
Sergeant of Marines
1958-1969


Bea Arthur & Hollywood Tie -Ties

Boot Camp clothes pin or hollywood tie-tie

In the 26 November 2014 news letter, Rusty Norman presented a very convincing argument for Bea Arthur having served in the Marine Corps. I would just like to pass along the evidence which led me to believe that she did not serve in the Corps. She appears to have been a strange lady. It makes me wonder why she would say she had not served in the Corps if she had. The rest of us are proud of our service, why would she not be proud too? I guess we'll never know but note how she changes the subject away from WWII after giving her answer and both she and the interviewer share a little titter.

I knew I had seen this and wasn't crazy.

Bea Arthur On Her Rumored Stint In The Marines.

One of the guys I went through boot camp with still has one of the clothes pins we used at MCRD San Diego in the Summer of 1962. He calls it a "Hollywood Tie-Tie" and attached is a picture of it he sent to me. He says he also has his name stamp with which we stamped our name on our clothing issue. I never used the name stamp after boot camp. If I bought any replacement clothing items I marked them with a black magic marker. I was never chastised for that.

Cpl. Jerry D.
USMC 1962-1966


Gladly Enjoy A Beer

Support vs Combat; I just had to reply to this:

On my first tour, I was in north I Corps. "DMZ Marines" yea, been there, done that. On my second tour, FLC in Da Nang. I tried like h-ll to get back into the 3rd MarDiv. My old TAOR, but no way. I wound up "in the rear with the beer" as a P.O.W. Guard, etc. it's true life is better not on the line, - what I learned - that does not mean anyone who was not in the direct line of fire got away with something or should somehow feel he didn't do what others did. If you are a Viet Nam veteran, I will gladly enjoy a beer with you and swap sea stories.

CoB 1st Bn. 8thMar 2dMarDiv
CoK 3rd Bn. 4thMar 3rdMarDiv
MPCo., HqBn, 1stMarDiv


What's Your Excuse

Improvise, Adapt, Overcome! What's your excuse numb nuts?

(Photo by Sgt Ray Lewis)

Wounded Marine in Afghanistan


As The Bus Was About To Close Its Doors

Back in '53, when I first arrived at the 3d MAW at the MCAS located at Opa-Locka, Dade County, Florida, segregation was in full bloom in South Florida. Marines who were on liberty in downtown Miami had to return to base and turn in their liberty cards by midnite. To achieve this there was a city of Miami bus scheduled to for this last run about 10:30 PM. None of the major roads like NW 27th Ave., or Interstate 95 had been built yet, so the bus had to travel side streets to get to the Opa-Locka Gate on time.

By the time the bus was ready to return the vehicle was packed with Marines. As the bus was about to close its doors an aged black woman quickly climbed on board and tiredly sat down in a front seat, which was a No-No as well as being prohibited by way of a city ordinance which stated that "Colored Had To Sit Rear To Front".

The driver insisted he couldn't move the bus until she sat in the back. Unfortunately, the bus was so packed she couldn't go anywhere. The Marines insisted the driver drive on or they would all be late, which he insisted he couldn't. After several moments of back and forth arguing and shouting, a Staff Sergeant from the Wing motor pool pushed his way to the front and gently escorted the driver off the bus. Then the SSgt sat down and proceeded to drive the bus to the Air Station allowing the woman to get off on Opa-Locka Blvd, then continued on to the gate. As soon as we reached the gate and he opened the doors again everyone rushed out of the bus scattering to the four winds.

Unbeknownst to the Marines we had been followed by several police cars from the City of Miami and the Sheriff's Department.

In the morning the entire Wing was called to report to the admin bldg. where we were confronted by the Wing Commander who demanded that the perpertrators report anyone who had helped "hijack" the bus. No one spoke up. In retaliation the CO called for the elimination of the city bus for use by the Marines. Instead, a military bus was assigned to pick us up to be driven by the SSgt almost as a permanent assignment.

Arnold Pakula


Proper Honors For A Marine

Mrs. Sterling receiving U.S. Burial Flag for Marine Husband

Mrs. Sterling with picture of Marine Husband and his Burial Flag

U.S. Colors Presented in a small private ceremony for Sgt. Dale Stirling, USMC / VIETNAM / deceased.

I have had a bit of difficulty organizing a time for getting together with Mrs. Stirling and presenting her with the United States Colors on behalf of grateful Nation and the Office of the President of the United States.

At Sgt. Stirling's funeral, Mrs. Stirling did not want any fanfare, however she did want me to Thank Cpl. Mike Steer for representing the United States Marine Corps (via the 49th Marines, Mission, B.C.) at the funeral. Cpl. Steer was there in his Dress Blues to pay respects to a Fallen Marine and to ensure that the Funeral would not be lacking a USMC presence. Elaine tells me that everyone that attended the service was very impressed with the handsome Marine attending. Thank you so very much Mike.

Terry and I (my Camera Person) went over to her home in Langley, British Columbia this morning. Prior to the colors being presented, Terry and I sat with Elaine and had a good yak. Mrs. Stirling is doing fine and enjoying life.

When the time came, I asked if it would be okay if I formally present her with the Colors. She said that would be fine and we made it happen.

So, on behalf of the "Theodore H. Snow" Post of the American Legion, Vancouver, B.C., Canada and the Vietnam Veterans in Canada, est. 1986, The flag was presented, the appropriate words were spoken and a smart, 3 second Hand Salute was rendered on behalf of all of us.

If you look closely, I got a huge haircut for this.

Gerry Flowers


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #1)

I had told Kitty that my parents had sold the farm and were on an extended vacation; that I was staying at the Cedar Lodge in Moorestown, N.J., when I went north on weekends. I do not recall having given her the address of the Cedar Lodge and I had been invited by Mr.'B' to stay with them - to avoid travel and expense - while my parents were on vacation. It is my best guess that Kitty may have called the Cedar Lodge to find out the address - and discovered that my parents had been there but had just moved to The Hemlocks - and got that address. I can think of no other way that she could have had the address. I said "I know what you were paid for the farm - $464,088 - but I am curious about what you paid for The Hemlocks. I was told it was an all cash transaction by Mr.'B'. Did you know that he was the realtor that handled the transaction?" My Mom and Dad looked at each other. Dad said "I had no idea until you just told us." Mom said "Our dealings were with a woman. She must have worked for him." I said "I am sure she did." Mom said "She was a lovely lady and it was a very quick sale. She never asked us exactly what it was we were looking for. I suppose a professional realtor always leads you to their most expensive offering first. She picked us up at the lodge and we went down to Mt. Laurel Road. She asked where we were from. I told her we had lived most of our lives in New York City - but the last 10 years in Medford. She was a little surprised to hear that." She asked "Then you know just where you are right now?" Mom replied "Oh, yes, we have been on this road thousands of times." They were slowing down. Mom was shocked when they pulled into The Hemlocks. They stopped in front of the house. Dad asked "I guess they want a pretty penny for this place?" The realtor said "It has just been reduced from $100,000 to $80,000 for a quick sale." Dad, the businessman that he was, asked "I wonder if they would take $75,000 CASH?" The realtor said "You shall know in just a few minutes." They went to the door. Mrs. Cecil welcomed them in. My mother said "Oh, Arnold, I love this place. I want to see the kitchen." While my parents were back in the kitchen the realtor asked Mrs. Cecil if she would accept $75,000 CASH. She said "I will split the difference - $77,500 CASH." My Dad was told this and was asked how long it would take for him to get the cash. He looked at his watch and said "My bank is in Mt. Holly. I can have a cashier's check before 2:00 PM. And when can we expect to move in?" Mrs. Cecil asked the realtor about a couple of homes in Moorestown that they had talked about. They were vacant and were available immediately. Mrs. Cecil said "As soon as I have your check I will move into one of these homes - and you can move into The Hemlocks."

It was a very, very fast transaction - from start to finish - an amazing deal. My parents had admired The Hemlocks for years and were quite familiar with what happened to the farm when the Turnpike went through the property. But I never heard either of them say that they would like to someday own The Hemlocks. This may well have been the culmination of their dreams. I would have thought The Hemlocks would have sold for two or three times what my parents paid. And we later found out that the original asking price - just after Mr. Cecil passed away and Mrs. Cecil decided to move into something smaller - was $250,000. The close proximity to the very busy N.J. Turnpike must have been a deterrent - but it certainly worked in favor of my parents. (The Cecils weren't hurting. The state had taken only 7 acres of 'undeveloped farmland' - for which they received about $70,000, but they were required to pay an additional $300,000 for destroying this dairy farm.)

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


The Tank Wasn't Hurt

For a number of years in the 60's and 70's, there existed in the two military branches (Army and Navy... Air Force is a corporation, sells 'flight hours'... and the Corps is a cult...) anyway, they both owned and operated a family of more or less amphibious vehicles known as "LARC"(s) and "BARC"(s). These were primarily intended for lighterage use... as in moving materiel from ship to shore rather than as assault vehicles. (if they had, had pistol grips and magazines, and fire selector switches... the media would've gotten that wrong more often than not, also...) the LARC, commonly pronounced 'Lark" like the bird, was the acronym for 'Lighter, Amphibious Resupply, Cargo"... BARC was similar, only the 'B' was for 'barge' (It was a big honker... could carry a tank, etc)... these things had aluminum hulls, boat-shaped in the case of the LARC, and humongous rubber tires, which doubled as the only suspension system. The LARC had a 3-man cabin in the front, and a rear engine, with a flat deck between the two. The thing would come alongside break-bulk shipping vessels, usually civilian, and receive cargo pallets by crane. Once loaded, they could return to shore, transit most beaches, and hit the road. Since they could travel on roads at reasonable speeds, they could go directly to a supply or ammo dump for direct unloading. Besides probably the SeaBees, Navy Shoremaster units also used them. In the mid-70's, 'floats' would periodically leave the 3rdMarDiv on Okinawa for something like a Pacific side MedCruise for landings in exotic places, including Australia. The Tracked Vehicle Bn (later re-named) at Camp Schwab (two companies each of LVTP-7 and M-48 tanks) would be tagged to send a platoon (+) of Amtracks (YATYAS) and a platoon of tanks along... don't recall if we had invented MEU or MAU yet, or were still using BLT, but the float in question was headed for Australia, among other places. At the time, there were some moderately salty types who had endured a Viet-Nam R&R in Australia, and there was considerable finagaling to get assigned to one of the units going...

They went... and they came back... with the sickest, sorriest running bunch of P-7's imaginable... the platoon all made it ashore, but just barely... seems that the LSD they were riding had re-fueled them with DFM (Diesel Fuel, Marine) instead of DF-2... DFM is a lower grade distalate, on top of which it was suspected that there was water contamination in the ship's tanks. The field expedient fix for that was to pump two 55-gallon drums full and set those aside before refueling the tractors... not a good idea.

The ship, which shall be nameless, mostly because I don't remember her name or number, was swinging at anchor in OraWan Bay at Schwab... ballasted down, stern gate open, etc. After watching 'our' platoon of tracks make it back to the beach, a couple of us from the Battalion Maintence shop caught a ride out to the ship in an LCU. LCUs come in several configurations, some with one ramp, some with two, etc. and all are big enough to carry three tanks or so... not real fast, maybe 10 knots flank speed, but a big hunk of steel at any rate.

There was a chop running in the bay... which, inside the well deck of the LSD meant there were 3-4 foot waves sloshing about... and the LCU was sloshing with them. Up on the wing walls were able-bodied Sailors handling the lines to get our LCU secured... ordinarily, I would snarkily have referred to these worthys as 'squids'... but since they were dancing a dangerous ballet amidst all the noise and fumes with only whistle instructions from a salty old Chief, I had to take off my cover to them... 300 tons of floating steel on the end of inch and a half line... moving at the whim of semi-captive saltwater... is something that could take off about anything caught between the line and anything hard. They got us secured... enough that a rough terrain forklift carrying a CONEX box could come down the ramp from the mezzanine deck to the ramp of the LCU... forward... and when the driver hit the brakes, the CONEX (which had inside it a fair share of the portable comm assets of a Bn of the Ninth Marines) slid off... into the salt water between the LCU ramp and the ship's ramp. The COMMO present was not Happy... more like Grumpy...

And... getting back to the LARC/BARC tale?... lashed securely to the forward part of the starboard wing wall was the BeachMaster's LARC... which had been somewhat modified by a LCU on a previous trip... best estimates were that it was now, width-wise, in the range of three, maybe four, feet wide... probably enough recyclable aluminum there to build a couple 2015 model year F-150's...

Reminded me of a ship that came into Naha harbor 1960 or so... Navy ship, civilian crew... had quite a mixed load, including most of the year's replacement vehicles for the 3rd Division Replace and Evacuate program. One of the items in the manifest was some M-48 tanks. On the way over, the ship had encountered some really rough seas... and one of the tanks came loose... Tis' said that the Division MTO broke into tears every time the winches brought up what was left of a thoroughly smashed motor transport asset... and the tank had wound up in the middle of a temporary refrigerated space... along with two or three tons of what had been butter. The tank wasn't hurt...

Ddick


Lost And Found

Sgt Grit,

I would like to hear from anyone that was at the MCAA Mojave Air Base. I'm 78 and don't have much time left to hear from them.

Sgt Jack Micheletti
1955 - 1962


Short Rounds

RE: Mike Cruden, Honoring My Dad.

You are a part of a "Marine Family," your father was part of "The Marine Family." You have every right to wear USMC items, the "Gold Star" you wear gives you that right, your dad paid for you to have that right. Get a shirt or hat that says, "Proud Son Of A U.S Marine Who Gave His All."

USMC VET
Brian Stack
"Once And Always"


I don't know when the Corps started calling Dungarees, Utilities?

Clarence Milster
USMC


I received a request for a story about WWII Doberman Pincers. He mentioned 11 or 13 were killed on Guam. Anyone work with them?

Sgt Grit


For Mike Cruden:

As far as I'm concerned, Marines relatives can wear the emblem to honor their Marines. My wife does. Lots of kids wear Grit Gear.

Semper Fi.

Robert A. Hall
Former SSgt
USMC 1964-68
USMCR, 1977-83


Quotes

"In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act."
--George Orwell, 1984


"Oderint dum metuant."
"Let them hate, so long as they fear."
--Caligula


"Marines don't know how to spell the word defeat"
--General James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"Demonstrate to the world there is 'No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy' than a U.S. Marine."
--General James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"We have two companies of Marines running rampant all over the northern half of this island, and three Army regiments pinned down in the southwestern corner, doing nothing. What the h-ll is going on?"
--Gen. John W. Vessey Jr., USA, Chairman of the the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the assault on Grenada, 1983


"And what's your excuse numb nuts!"

"Excuse me Scrotum Head, but you must think you're in Caveman Platoon. Straighten your back before I break it!"

"We've done so much with so little for so long, we can do almost anything with nothing! The difficult we do immediately... the Impossible takes a little longer..."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

©2014 Sgt Grit Inc
All rights reserved
7100 SW 44th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73179
888-NOV-1775
You are reading Sgt Grit's weekly newsletter.

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Subscribe to this newsletter.

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 04 DEC 2014
If you are having trouble viewing this issue, see it on our website:
http://www.grunt.com/corps/newsletter/10330/

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 04 DEC 2014

In this issue:
• The Only Japanese American
• Battle For Okinawa
• Proper Honors For A Marine

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

Flags   Family Member   Ka-Bars   Auto   Headgear  Jackets  ALL CATEGORIES  

Request a catalog
Facebook Twitter Sgt Grit Blog Sgt Grit's RSS Feeds

I wore this jacket at a Veteran's Day function in Amherst, Ohio, and received many compliments and requests for the vendor's address. I could hardly refuse, and gladly gave it to them. I hope many responded. It seems that everywhere I go, I get many compliments about it. Thank You very much.

Semper Fi,
George Seitz
Cpl, 1962-1967

Get the highlighted jacket at:

USMC Black/Digital Desert Twill Jacket


The Only Japanese American

Sgt Grit,

When I joined the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, in Sept 1959, I did not know what I was in for. Being the only Japanese American in the entire 1stMarDiv., it was scary. Then I met the Old Corps Marines. The Battalion 1st SGT was a Marine Raider, many of the senior Staff NCO's and Officers were veterans of many of the major battles of the Pacific and Korea. For some reason, these Marines took a liking to me and told me stories of the Pacific war/Korea they participated in. To this day, I still remember their stories as if it was yesterday. I am proud to have met these Old Corps Marines. They and my Battalion Commander, LtCol K. J. Houghton, made me the effective leader that I would become in the Marines and later in civilian life. Many of these Marines have are gone now, but what they taught me, I taught other Marines and people that worked for me for 27 years in civilian life. You never forget those that came before and after you. So Marines, teach and train your Marines and continue the legacy. Semper Fi.

Sgt Ted K. Shimono
1959-1968


Battle For Okinawa

Sgt. Grit,

During the Battle for Okinawa most Marines are aware that the Japanese used Suicide (Hari Kari) planes against us. But there was more, they used Suicide Boats against us also. Inclosed is a picture of the suicide boats. Some boats had Ford and Chevrolet engines in them. They were not effective for lots of reasons, we had PT Boats and other types of patrol craft that kept them from being very effective, as soon as they began their run the PT boats were on them. There were problems with this idea on stopping the Hari Kari Boats also, some were armed with two depth charges, which went off at shallow depths which could cause damage to nearby ships and serious injury and death to American and Allied Personel.

Among other exciting things they intended to us​e against the Invasion Forces were Swimmers, that had explosives attached to themselves and could damage a ship, their purpose was to put explosives on the ships screw which would prevent the ship from moving but I saw ships screws turning from time to time which would make it difficult for a swimmer to attach anything to the screw.

And when we Arrived in Japan after they surrendered there were hundreds of tunnels dug into the hills with tracks coming from them where suicide boats could be launched (we could still see the tunnels when we went to Korea, stopping at Japan). The Invasion of Japan according to Naval Intelligence at the time, would cause nearly a million casualties (both American, Allied and Japanese).

Many of us that were preparing for the invasion of Japan, expected it to be our last day on Earth. Even a friend who was a Gunner on a B25, expected he wouldn't live through the invasion of Japan. All this information will be in books about our preparation of the Invasion of Japan but little thought will be given to the thousands of ships and thousands of men that were there, the thoughts and the letters that were not mailed because the writer lived through the Invasion.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Nothing Bad Happened To Me That Day

I was at 'Hollywood' boot camp in 1964. About a week before Thanksgiving my girlfriend sent a letter and enclosed a piece of Juicy Fruit gum. The DI felt it during mail call and made me open the letter. (a few weeks before a stick of Clark's Teaberry gum got through detected) I had to go outside and do squat thrusts in the sand pit until the flavor was gone. Although I chewed like mad the flavor remained when he appeared after about 5 minutes. I relied "Sir, Yes sir," when I was asked if the flavor was gone. He replied "Bulls---, maggot. Keep going." The second time he came out he told me to get my bayonet and give the gum a proper burial among the Ice Plant. The next time he was on duty was the day before Thanksgiving. My youngest sister had sent a birthday card that was embossed. The DI felt it and remembering the gum made me open it. When he saw what it was he asked me how old I was going to be and when? With all the proper 'Sir's' in place I revealed I was going to be 18 on Thanksgiving.

The next day was a holiday for most people, but in boot camp everyone knows, it was just another day in training. Lined up before the evening meal I heard the Senior DI calling out for me to report to the front where he stood. I got my b-tt up there as fast as I could, not knowing what the heck was going on. He told me to get in the front of the line. As we entered the mess hall for our Thanksgiving feast he walked along side of me and told the kp recruits to give me more turkey, mashed potatoes, and an extra dessert. My mind kept racing over and over as to what calamity was going to happen later. After the meal and in formation to march back to our area the DI walked up to me and wished me a Happy Birthday. That evening was just an easy evening of spit polishing our dress shoes for graduation that was quickly approaching and polishing our brass. Nothing bad happened to me that day.

Phil Bennink, Sgt '64-'68


Life Was Good Then

I remember those who got PFC out of boot camp and it was one, who was the honor guide whose name was Hill. 1958, plt 231, 2nd bn., MCRD. I spent two years in the Corps before I was promoted to PFC. Then the next 7 years I had 7 promotion warrants, up and down. Would not have changed it for the world. Life was good then, I call it my p-ss and vinegar days.

Robert D Gordon
Sergeant of Marines
1958-1969


Bea Arthur & Hollywood Tie -Ties

In the 26 November 2014 news letter, Rusty Norman presented a very convincing argument for Bea Arthur having served in the Marine Corps. I would just like to pass along the evidence which led me to believe that she did not serve in the Corps. She appears to have been a strange lady. It makes me wonder why she would say she had not served in the Corps if she had. The rest of us are proud of our service, why would she not be proud too? I guess we'll never know but note how she changes the subject away from WWII after giving her answer and both she and the interviewer share a little titter.

I knew I had seen this and wasn't crazy.

Bea Arthur On Her Rumored Stint In The Marines.

One of the guys I went through boot camp with still has one of the clothes pins we used at MCRD San Diego in the Summer of 1962. He calls it a "Hollywood Tie-Tie" and attached is a picture of it he sent to me. He says he also has his name stamp with which we stamped our name on our clothing issue. I never used the name stamp after boot camp. If I bought any replacement clothing items I marked them with a black magic marker. I was never chastised for that.

Cpl. Jerry D.
USMC 1962-1966


Gladly Enjoy A Beer

Support vs Combat; I just had to reply to this:

On my first tour, I was in north I Corps. "DMZ Marines" yea, been there, done that. On my second tour, FLC in Da Nang. I tried like h-ll to get back into the 3rd MarDiv. My old TAOR, but no way. I wound up "in the rear with the beer" as a P.O.W. Guard, etc. it's true life is better not on the line, - what I learned - that does not mean anyone who was not in the direct line of fire got away with something or should somehow feel he didn't do what others did. If you are a Viet Nam veteran, I will gladly enjoy a beer with you and swap sea stories.

CoB 1st Bn. 8thMar 2dMarDiv
CoK 3rd Bn. 4thMar 3rdMarDiv
MPCo., HqBn, 1stMarDiv


As The Bus Was About To Close Its Doors

Back in '53, when I first arrived at the 3d MAW at the MCAS located at Opa-Locka, Dade County, Florida, segregation was in full bloom in South Florida. Marines who were on liberty in downtown Miami had to return to base and turn in their liberty cards by midnite. To achieve this there was a city of Miami bus scheduled to for this last run about 10:30 PM. None of the major roads like NW 27th Ave., or Interstate 95 had been built yet, so the bus had to travel side streets to get to the Opa-Locka Gate on time.

By the time the bus was ready to return the vehicle was packed with Marines. As the bus was about to close its doors an aged black woman quickly climbed on board and tiredly sat down in a front seat, which was a No-No as well as being prohibited by way of a city ordinance which stated that "Colored Had To Sit Rear To Front".

The driver insisted he couldn't move the bus until she sat in the back. Unfortunately, the bus was so packed she couldn't go anywhere. The Marines insisted the driver drive on or they would all be late, which he insisted he couldn't. After several moments of back and forth arguing and shouting, a Staff Sergeant from the Wing motor pool pushed his way to the front and gently escorted the driver off the bus. Then the SSgt sat down and proceeded to drive the bus to the Air Station allowing the woman to get off on Opa-Locka Blvd, then continued on to the gate. As soon as we reached the gate and he opened the doors again everyone rushed out of the bus scattering to the four winds.

Unbeknownst to the Marines we had been followed by several police cars from the City of Miami and the Sheriff's Department.

In the morning the entire Wing was called to report to the admin bldg. where we were confronted by the Wing Commander who demanded that the perpertrators report anyone who had helped "hijack" the bus. No one spoke up. In retaliation the CO called for the elimination of the city bus for use by the Marines. Instead, a military bus was assigned to pick us up to be driven by the SSgt almost as a permanent assignment.

Arnold Pakula


Proper Honors For A Marine

U.S. Colors Presented in a small private ceremony for Sgt. Dale Stirling, USMC / VIETNAM / deceased.

I have had a bit of difficulty organizing a time for getting together with Mrs. Stirling and presenting her with the United States Colors on behalf of grateful Nation and the Office of the President of the United States.

At Sgt. Stirling's funeral, Mrs. Stirling did not want any fanfare, however she did want me to Thank Cpl. Mike Steer for representing the United States Marine Corps (via the 49th Marines, Mission, B.C.) at the funeral. Cpl. Steer was there in his Dress Blues to pay respects to a Fallen Marine and to ensure that the Funeral would not be lacking a USMC presence. Elaine tells me that everyone that attended the service was very impressed with the handsome Marine attending. Thank you so very much Mike.

Terry and I (my Camera Person) went over to her home in Langley, British Columbia this morning. Prior to the colors being presented, Terry and I sat with Elaine and had a good yak. Mrs. Stirling is doing fine and enjoying life.

When the time came, I asked if it would be okay if I formally present her with the Colors. She said that would be fine and we made it happen.

So, on behalf of the "Theodore H. Snow" Post of the American Legion, Vancouver, B.C., Canada and the Vietnam Veterans in Canada, est. 1986, The flag was presented, the appropriate words were spoken and a smart, 3 second Hand Salute was rendered on behalf of all of us.

If you look closely, I got a huge haircut for this.

Gerry Flowers


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #12, #1)

I had told Kitty that my parents had sold the farm and were on an extended vacation; that I was staying at the Cedar Lodge in Moorestown, N.J., when I went north on weekends. I do not recall having given her the address of the Cedar Lodge and I had been invited by Mr.'B' to stay with them - to avoid travel and expense - while my parents were on vacation. It is my best guess that Kitty may have called the Cedar Lodge to find out the address - and discovered that my parents had been there but had just moved to The Hemlocks - and got that address. I can think of no other way that she could have had the address. I said "I know what you were paid for the farm - $464,088 - but I am curious about what you paid for The Hemlocks. I was told it was an all cash transaction by Mr.'B'. Did you know that he was the realtor that handled the transaction?" My Mom and Dad looked at each other. Dad said "I had no idea until you just told us." Mom said "Our dealings were with a woman. She must have worked for him." I said "I am sure she did." Mom said "She was a lovely lady and it was a very quick sale. She never asked us exactly what it was we were looking for. I suppose a professional realtor always leads you to their most expensive offering first. She picked us up at the lodge and we went down to Mt. Laurel Road. She asked where we were from. I told her we had lived most of our lives in New York City - but the last 10 years in Medford. She was a little surprised to hear that." She asked "Then you know just where you are right now?" Mom replied "Oh, yes, we have been on this road thousands of times." They were slowing down. Mom was shocked when they pulled into The Hemlocks. They stopped in front of the house. Dad asked "I guess they want a pretty penny for this place?" The realtor said "It has just been reduced from $100,000 to $80,000 for a quick sale." Dad, the businessman that he was, asked "I wonder if they would take $75,000 CASH?" The realtor said "You shall know in just a few minutes." They went to the door. Mrs. Cecil welcomed them in. My mother said "Oh, Arnold, I love this place. I want to see the kitchen." While my parents were back in the kitchen the realtor asked Mrs. Cecil if she would accept $75,000 CASH. She said "I will split the difference - $77,500 CASH." My Dad was told this and was asked how long it would take for him to get the cash. He looked at his watch and said "My bank is in Mt. Holly. I can have a cashier's check before 2:00 PM. And when can we expect to move in?" Mrs. Cecil asked the realtor about a couple of homes in Moorestown that they had talked about. They were vacant and were available immediately. Mrs. Cecil said "As soon as I have your check I will move into one of these homes - and you can move into The Hemlocks."

It was a very, very fast transaction - from start to finish - an amazing deal. My parents had admired The Hemlocks for years and were quite familiar with what happened to the farm when the Turnpike went through the property. But I never heard either of them say that they would like to someday own The Hemlocks. This may well have been the culmination of their dreams. I would have thought The Hemlocks would have sold for two or three times what my parents paid. And we later found out that the original asking price - just after Mr. Cecil passed away and Mrs. Cecil decided to move into something smaller - was $250,000. The close proximity to the very busy N.J. Turnpike must have been a deterrent - but it certainly worked in favor of my parents. (The Cecils weren't hurting. The state had taken only 7 acres of 'undeveloped farmland' - for which they received about $70,000, but they were required to pay an additional $300,000 for destroying this dairy farm.)

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


The Tank Wasn't Hurt

For a number of years in the 60's and 70's, there existed in the two military branches (Army and Navy... Air Force is a corporation, sells 'flight hours'... and the Corps is a cult...) anyway, they both owned and operated a family of more or less amphibious vehicles known as "LARC"(s) and "BARC"(s). These were primarily intended for lighterage use... as in moving materiel from ship to shore rather than as assault vehicles. (if they had, had pistol grips and magazines, and fire selector switches... the media would've gotten that wrong more often than not, also...) the LARC, commonly pronounced 'Lark" like the bird, was the acronym for 'Lighter, Amphibious Resupply, Cargo"... BARC was similar, only the 'B' was for 'barge' (It was a big honker... could carry a tank, etc)... these things had aluminum hulls, boat-shaped in the case of the LARC, and humongous rubber tires, which doubled as the only suspension system. The LARC had a 3-man cabin in the front, and a rear engine, with a flat deck between the two. The thing would come alongside break-bulk shipping vessels, usually civilian, and receive cargo pallets by crane. Once loaded, they could return to shore, transit most beaches, and hit the road. Since they could travel on roads at reasonable speeds, they could go directly to a supply or ammo dump for direct unloading. Besides probably the SeaBees, Navy Shoremaster units also used them. In the mid-70's, 'floats' would periodically leave the 3rdMarDiv on Okinawa for something like a Pacific side MedCruise for landings in exotic places, including Australia. The Tracked Vehicle Bn (later re-named) at Camp Schwab (two companies each of LVTP-7 and M-48 tanks) would be tagged to send a platoon (+) of Amtracks (YATYAS) and a platoon of tanks along... don't recall if we had invented MEU or MAU yet, or were still using BLT, but the float in question was headed for Australia, among other places. At the time, there were some moderately salty types who had endured a Viet-Nam R&R in Australia, and there was considerable finagaling to get assigned to one of the units going...

They went... and they came back... with the sickest, sorriest running bunch of P-7's imaginable... the platoon all made it ashore, but just barely... seems that the LSD they were riding had re-fueled them with DFM (Diesel Fuel, Marine) instead of DF-2... DFM is a lower grade distalate, on top of which it was suspected that there was water contamination in the ship's tanks. The field expedient fix for that was to pump two 55-gallon drums full and set those aside before refueling the tractors... not a good idea.

The ship, which shall be nameless, mostly because I don't remember her name or number, was swinging at anchor in OraWan Bay at Schwab... ballasted down, stern gate open, etc. After watching 'our' platoon of tracks make it back to the beach, a couple of us from the Battalion Maintence shop caught a ride out to the ship in an LCU. LCUs come in several configurations, some with one ramp, some with two, etc. and all are big enough to carry three tanks or so... not real fast, maybe 10 knots flank speed, but a big hunk of steel at any rate.

There was a chop running in the bay... which, inside the well deck of the LSD meant there were 3-4 foot waves sloshing about... and the LCU was sloshing with them. Up on the wing walls were able-bodied Sailors handling the lines to get our LCU secured... ordinarily, I would snarkily have referred to these worthys as 'squids'... but since they were dancing a dangerous ballet amidst all the noise and fumes with only whistle instructions from a salty old Chief, I had to take off my cover to them... 300 tons of floating steel on the end of inch and a half line... moving at the whim of semi-captive saltwater... is something that could take off about anything caught between the line and anything hard. They got us secured... enough that a rough terrain forklift carrying a CONEX box could come down the ramp from the mezzanine deck to the ramp of the LCU... forward... and when the driver hit the brakes, the CONEX (which had inside it a fair share of the portable comm assets of a Bn of the Ninth Marines) slid off... into the salt water between the LCU ramp and the ship's ramp. The COMMO present was not Happy... more like Grumpy...

And... getting back to the LARC/BARC tale?... lashed securely to the forward part of the starboard wing wall was the BeachMaster's LARC... which had been somewhat modified by a LCU on a previous trip... best estimates were that it was now, width-wise, in the range of three, maybe four, feet wide... probably enough recyclable aluminum there to build a couple 2015 model year F-150's...

Reminded me of a ship that came into Naha harbor 1960 or so... Navy ship, civilian crew... had quite a mixed load, including most of the year's replacement vehicles for the 3rd Division Replace and Evacuate program. One of the items in the manifest was some M-48 tanks. On the way over, the ship had encountered some really rough seas... and one of the tanks came loose... Tis' said that the Division MTO broke into tears every time the winches brought up what was left of a thoroughly smashed motor transport asset... and the tank had wound up in the middle of a temporary refrigerated space... along with two or three tons of what had been butter. The tank wasn't hurt...

Ddick


Lost And Found

Sgt Grit,

I would like to hear from anyone that was at the MCAA Mojave Air Base. I'm 78 and don't have much time left to hear from them.

Sgt Jack Micheletti
1955 - 1962


Short Rounds

RE: Mike Cruden, Honoring My Dad.

You are a part of a "Marine Family," your father was part of "The Marine Family." You have every right to wear USMC items, the "Gold Star" you wear gives you that right, your dad paid for you to have that right. Get a shirt or hat that says, "Proud Son Of A U.S Marine Who Gave His All."

USMC VET
Brian Stack
"Once And Always"


I don't know when the Corps started calling Dungarees, Utilities?

Clarence Milster
USMC


I received a request for a story about WWII Doberman Pincers. He mentioned 11 or 13 were killed on Guam. Anyone work with them?

Sgt Grit


For Mike Cruden:

As far as I'm concerned, Marines relatives can wear the emblem to honor their Marines. My wife does. Lots of kids wear Grit Gear.

Semper Fi.

Robert A. Hall
Former SSgt
USMC 1964-68
USMCR, 1977-83


Quotes

"In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act."
--George Orwell, 1984


"Oderint dum metuant."
"Let them hate, so long as they fear."
--Caligula


"Marines don't know how to spell the word defeat"
--General James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"Demonstrate to the world there is 'No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy' than a U.S. Marine."
--General James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"We have two companies of Marines running rampant all over the northern half of this island, and three Army regiments pinned down in the southwestern corner, doing nothing. What the h-ll is going on?"
--Gen. John W. Vessey Jr., USA, Chairman of the the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the assault on Grenada, 1983


"And what's your excuse numb nuts!"

"Excuse me Scrotum Head, but you must think you're in Caveman Platoon. Straighten your back before I break it!"

"We've done so much with so little for so long, we can do almost anything with nothing! The difficult we do immediately... the Impossible takes a little longer..."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 27 Nov 2014

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 27 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• Banana Wars and Tell Your Mother
• USO Shows
• The 12th General Order

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Sgt Grit and Staff would like to wish all Marines and their families a very safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving. May we all remember to pray for our brothers and sisters that are forward deployed so that we can enjoy this holiday season in true American fashion. May God bless you all and remember that "Every day is a holiday, Every meal is a feast, and Every paycheck is a fortune!"

Semper Fi!

Scales for Thanksgiving


Support​ vs Combat

I've often wondered what the ratio was for support troops vs combat troops. I've seen figures for Viet Nam ranging as high as 10-1. I think it's safe to say that is probably not far off the mark. (see the included article: Myths & Misconceptions: Vietnam War Folklore).

I've talked to more than a few Marines who served in a support position and occasionally the subject of regret over not having been in combat comes up. I have yet to find a single support Marine - REMF, in the rear with the gear and the beer and all the other derogatory comments about the jobs the non-03xx Marines did - who does not have some measure of regret that he never got the opportunity to take Charlie to the big dance and that includes myself. I can only tell you from my own perspective, about 98% of the time (80% of statistics are made up on the spot, as is that one – LOL) I am thankful my tour of duty did NOT include any combat. Judging only from what I've read and what I've heard, combat is some messed up sh-t. As always, you have my deepest appreciation for all you do for the Marine community.

Thanks & Semper Fi
Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Jerry D.


Banana Wars and Tell Your Mother

While working as a rifle instructor on the range at Camp Lejeune in 1955-7, I came to know and old Master Sergeant who ran the pistol range. He already had 30+ years in the Corps and was as crusty as they came. His name was Duncavage. Sometimes on the weekends he would come into the slopshoot and regale us with stories about the Banana Wars where he had served with Chesty Puller. He ran the pistol range with an iron hand. On every Monday when a new group of shooters reported in he would give a demonstration as to how to shoot the 45 automatic. On slow and rapid fire he would blast out the ten ring every time. Then he would go to the course where the target would face you for three seconds and then turn away. If you hit anywhere on the target you got points. Sergeant Duncavage would fire ten rounds in this course but it looked like he was missing the target completely. Titters would be heard from those watching the demonstration. "The old bast-rd missed the target completely," someone would say. But then when the targets were pulled in to be examined there they were--ten perfect shots in the head of the target where no one was looking. He pulled that on every group of shooters who came to his range.

One Monday a new group of shooters came in among whom was a bushy tailed 2nd Lieutenant, probably fresh out of Quantico. When Duncavage walked by the Lieutenant without saluting him (we old hands knew that on the ranges you didn't have to salute any officer below field grade, but this young shave-tail apparently didn't know that). The Lieutenant called Sergeant Duncavage back and asked why he hadn't saluted him. Sergeant Duncavage snapped to attention and rendered the appropriate highball. The Lieutenant began to walk away triumphant but Sergeant Duncavage called after him, "Now go home and tell your mother you met a real Marine!" You couldn't make up a story like that.

S/Sgt. Paul E. Gill, 1954-68


Vietnam Veteran Ribbon T-Shirt


USO Shows

Marine Recon unit taking photo with USO guest in Vietnam

Vietnamese prisoner captured by Marine Recon unit

Sgt. Grit,

In my 27 Years of Service I've seen a lot of USO shows (actually this is the term used for all shows shown to us in a War Zone). Top Actors during the 1920's, 30's, 40's made USO Shows during WWII, most of them went to the European War. I did get to see Bob Hope, Jack Carson and some lesser named Actors, but not often. Now in Vietnam most of the military men were not familiar with this group but the Girls were Pretty with short dresses and did a shimmy or two. This was the Group Al Jolson (WHO?) put together and sent to Vietnam. No l didn't see Al, Jolson was a big hit during the 1920's and 1930's, and he died in the 1950's so he wasn't there, but if you have a Group and a Manager who's still around, they could be sent to perform for us. You can see the guys enjoying seeing the girls.

Earlier that week Recon brought in a Prisoner (note the Ho Chi Minh sandals) and we even polished our boots in Vietnam as you can see.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Iwo Jima Marines

Iwo Jima Marines join other brother and sister Marines to celebrate USMC birthday

This year at Cookies Tavern in South Philadelphia, PA, there were two Iwo Jima Marines that joined with other brother and sister Marines to celebrate our 239th Birthday!

Semper Fi


Reward Was An Orange

While going through Staging Battalion at Las Pulgas, one of the courses was Escape and Evasion. As I remember it we had to go from one hill down to a valley and up to the summit of another hill without being captured by the aggressors, who happened to be reservists. We were allowed a bayonet and poncho and the reward for completing the course was an orange. It was nearing dark and the instructor pointed out to us the smudge pot on the hill where we would receive our piece of fruit. It didn't look that far away, but was I wrong. We got the word to take off and as we started to descend the hill I could hear others mumbling that there was no way some weekend warrior is going to capture me when I'm off to WESTPAC. I wasn't half way down the hill when I began stumbling over all kinds of vegetation and brush and before I knew it I was at the bottom of the hill. Now the fun begins as I had to circumvent a creek and start up the hill. The aggressors were yelling surrender, give it up, it isn't worth it. Many did surrender, but not me. I'm grabbing onto branches and whatever I could feel in the dark. Suddenly the bushes in front of me started erupting and I didn't know what to make of it, so I got into the prone position, placed the poncho over my head and had the bayonet at the ready. I peeked from under the poncho and two eyes were staring at me as a very large owl came swooping down. Back under the poncho. Well, I eventually made it to the top, bloodied, mud head to toe along with torn utility trousers. I was handed my orange and the individual walked away shaking his head. I looked around and saw many of the Marines I had started off with huddled around the smudge pot shivering in their ponchos, but no oranges. Was I the only idiot who completed this course? The big question in my mind was, was it worth it? With a few choice words and I do mean choice, I took my reward and flung it down the hill as the others watched, probably wondering what's this guy's problem.

Sgt. Joe Alvino, USMC


1954 Ford and 45 Years

1954 Ford F-100 restored driver side view

11th Marines Coins with the names Grit, Fuller, Goog, and Hunts

I have seen in the past few newsletters, Marines sending pictures of their cars and trucks with items from your store. I have just completed a nut and bolt restoration/customizing of my 1954 Ford F-100. I wanted to have something special made to honor my friends, friends I made 45 years ago in a really ugly hooch. I had the honor and the privilege to be with 11th Marines and living, eating, a tad bit of drinking, and standing watch with Don Whitton, John Gugliotta, and Jim Fuller. We still speak and visit to this day.

I wanted a custom job done. I did not want just a decal. I contacted Sgt Grit's Custom Department and they had four challenge coins made for me exactly as I wanted them. On each wheel dust cap is an 11th Marines Regimental logo and below is engraved each of the names: Grit, Goog, Fuller, and Hunts. Perfect fit. I would urge you all to try the custom department. If you can dream it, they can do it.

And yes, everyone notices the caps.

SSgt Dan Huntsinger
USMC '68-'74
11th Marines, DaNang '69-'70


USMC OD Green T-Shirt


Bea Arthur

Bea Arthur enlisting in the Marine Corps

Bea Arthur once she was a Marine

In July 2009, a Jerry D. was telling all about famous people that contributed to Society but have also earned "The Title", he mentions Bea Arthur (Golden Girls) having categorically denied she was a Marine. Here is an update w/pic:

DECEMBER 9 - While she strangely denied serving in the armed forces, military records show that the actress Bea Arthur spent 30 months in the Marine Corps, where she was one of the first members of the Women's Reserve and spent time as a typist and a truck driver.

The "Maude" and "The Golden Girls" star, who died last year at age 86, enlisted in early-1943 when she was 21 (and known as Bernice Frankel). In a February 1943 letter included in her Marine personnel file, Arthur gave military officials a brief account of her prior employment as a food analyst at a Maryland packing plant, a hospital lab technician, and an office worker at a New York loan company.

Arthur was due to start a new job, but she "heard last week that enlistments for women in the Marines were open, so decided the only thing to do was to join." While she hoped for an assignment in ground aviation, Arthur noted that she was "willing to get in now and do whatever is desired of me until such time as ground schools are organized." She added, "As far as hobbies are concerned, I've dabbled in music and dramatics."

As part of the enlistment process, Arthur underwent interviews that resulted in the production of "personality appraisal" sheets. One such analysis described her conversation as "Argumentative" and her attitude and manner as "Over aggressive." In a handwritten note, the Marine interviewer remarked, "Officious - but probably a good worker - if she has her own way!"

Arthur is pictured here in an official Marine photo taken shortly after her enlistment. A second undated portrait can be seen above.

Semper Fi
Rusty Norman
Echo 2/9 1969
USMC 1966-


The 12th General Order

2nd Tank Bn Marines enjoy a Christmas Party 1964

By Ken Zebal

In the early 1960s, 2nd Tank Bn had a well-established fire watch program at the tank park. Generally speaking, two lower-ranking Marines from the flames platoon and each gun company were posted at the tank park inside their respective tool sheds from about 1800 to 0600. I was a PFC at the time and was assigned fire watch for Charlie Company along with Pat Rogers. Pat and I went to boot camp at Parris Island together (Aug-Nov '63) and then to ITR at Camp Geiger (Nov-Dec '63) before reporting into Co "C", 2TkBn (Dec '63) and then going on boot leave. This was my first fire watch and may also have been Pat's. We were nominated by our Platoon Sergeant, S/Sgt "Gunny" Jandrozits, and then hand-selected by the Company Gunny, GySgt Sam Fullerton whose sea bag read like a WWII war novel. After everyone else went on liberty call Pat and I were briefed by the Company Gunny, went to Mess Hall 207 across the street and were issued mid-rats. In those days it was a brown paper sack filled with a sandwich, hard-boiled egg, apple, container of milk and a napkin all lovingly prepared by one of the cooks.

Along with the other fire watches we reported to the Battalion CP and the Officer of the Day. The OD that day was a WWII and Korea vintage Master Sergeant in Winter Service Alphas. The fire watches were in utilities, green wool shirts, field jackets, gloves and had mid-rats. We received our instructions from the OD and took that short 15 minute walk to the tank park. After getting settled in and looking around we lit the kerosene stove and hung out with nothing else to do for the next 11 hours and 30 minutes. Oh there was the occasional snapping of an M-103 torsion bar but other than that it was quiet. Pat may have had a portable radio so we could listen to WCBS and KDKA, but I don't recall us being quite that salty yet. Every now and again we would take turns walking around the tank ramp just to get some fresh air but it was really boring. About 2200 or so the OD (MSgt what's-his-name) came to check post. Pat and I popped to attention and reported "Charlie Company all secure with nothing unusual to report." The MSgt comes up to me and asks if I knew my 10th General Order, I responded (to salute all officers and all colors and standards not cased). So then he asked why I didn't salute him since he was the OD. Well that was easy, I said because you're enlisted. I thought it was a trick question. He seemed a bit put off by my response so we went through a brief question and answer session with him asking the questions and me providing seemingly unsatisfactory answers. In the meantime, Pat was edging towards the hatch, tank ramp and safety. It didn't take long for the OD to leave and for me and Pat to review the situation. Pat kept saying "if you would have just saluted him, he would have gone away happy." After morning formation the next day, I got to meet the 1st Sgt and for some unknown reason he seemed a bit grumpy. I attributed it to him being old but really did admire his herringbone utilities – what we used to call dungarees. Being a PFC with about 6 months in the Corps I admired everything salty. He jumped right to business without even asking how I was doing and whether or not I liked the Martine Corps, or what he could do to make my enlistment a more pleasant experience. He also really didn't seem all that interested in my perspective of things – maybe he had other things on his mind. However, he did seem fixated on the rank structure and my position at the bottom which he kept mentioning over and over. All in all I guess that didn't go as well as it could have. About a week later I was once again nominated and hand-selected, but this time it was for 30 days of mess duty, clearly a sign that my fledgling career was progressing.

Note: From time to time I will reprint a story from the USMC Tanker Association newsletter.

Sgt Grit

The Assoc. National Recruiter is:
Greg Martin
Email: usmctanker[at]comcast.net
Phone: 360-480-1206


Ranks Can Be Deceiving

I've been following with interest the comments posted here, re Marines graduating boot camp with rank. When I graduated more than six decades ago, one of the Marines I enlisted with received his corporal chevrons because he was prior service in WWII. In fact, the guide for another platoon in our series came out with three stripes.

Coming back from Korea, I was sent TAD to the base PIO at Pendleton to write features stories on reserve units receiving their summer drills for their hometown media. One of the other Marines in our office was a SSgt. He had gone the "O" route, but prior to commissioning it was discovered that the university he attended in one of the Central American countries was not accredited.

In short, ranks for newbee Marines can be deceiving. BTW. My youngest son was guaranteed PFC because of college credit when he enlisted some 25 years ago.

Semper Fi,
Bob Rader #140xxxx
God Bless America and the U.S. Marine Corps


Lost And Found

I went through boot camp at Parris Island in the summer and fall of 1960. Then on to combat training at Camp Geiger. I was sent from there to 2nd Bat, 6th Marines at Camp Lejeune, NC and served as a rifleman until I transferred to Quantico as an instructor in 1963. I was discharged in July of 1963. I would like to contact some of the guys I served with but only remember a few of their names. We were in Fox and Golf co. Ralph Demaio, and Charlie Drummy were my close buddies and would appreciate hearing from anybody who remembers them as well as me.

Roland G. Pelletier, LCpl
also known as Pellie or Professor


Honoring My Dad

Sgt Grit,

I am a proud son of a fallen Marine. My Dad served in Korea and was killed in Vietnam. He spent 16 years in the Corps. My Mom did not want me to join but I do volunteer with some Veterans groups to Honor my Dad. I also go down to Washington on the 10th and 11th of November to pay my respects. This year wearing some Grit gear I was told since I did not serve I should not wear it. I always wear my Gold Star pin and tell anyone who asks I did not serve but that I am Honoring my Dad. I would like to hear from you and your readers on this.

Mike Cruden
Son of S/Sgt Donald J Cruden, USMC KIA 12/27/67


Visited Your Warehouse

Marine Veteran Robert and Sgt Grit photo

Dear Sgt. Grit,

My fiance and I visited the warehouse on November 6th. For many years Robert has wanted to visit and to meet Sgt. Grit in person. We loved the shop, his collection, Sgt Grit himself, and the staff made us feel right at home. Thanks for doing all that you do and for being there for your fellow Marines.

I have attached a picture of my fiance and Sgt. Grit.

Thanks again!
Semper Fi


My Son

For all of those that have sons or daughters at boot camp let me pass on what I found. Let me give you a little background first. When my son left home he had no motivation, he was lazy, slobby, no pride, no self-worth. This is the boy that got off the bus March 18th at Parris Island. The man that I met on Thursday for parent's day is AWESOME. There is no way I can describe to you all the difference. He looks different, he walks different, he talks different, he has such a sense of bearing and pride all I could do was look at him in awe. Oh yes, the training is hard, what he went through is unimaginable to any one that has not been there. They are definitely taught to be Warriors. Let me tell you the surprise of what else they are taught. My Marine son has better values, better morals, better manners than anyone I know. It is so much more than Yes Sir, Yes Mam... so much more. He cares about how he looks, he cares about what he does, and it's not a boastful, bad azs thing. He is a true gentleman. I saw patience, and a calmness in him that I have never seen. I could never express my gratitude enough to the Marine Corps for what they have given my son. I know this, I have an 11 year old Devil pup still at home. When the time comes for his turn if I had to I would take him kicking and screaming all the way. Although I'm sure that will not happen. The hero worship I see in my younger son's eyes for his Marine brother tells me I will have two Marines in the family, and I will be one very proud mother.

"Cybil", Mother of a Marine writing to the myMarine Group
Submitted many years ago, thought I would reprint.


General Lejeune

Sgt Grit,

My dad served with General Lejeune In France during WW1 at the Meuse-Argonne, he was with the 2nd Indian Head Division, U.S. Army, Signal Corp, Master Sergeant. The General Requested him to operate the station and handle all telegraph and coded messages. Later on at Blanc Monte on Oct. 3, 1918 in operations of the A.E.F. (I shortened it) in testimony thereof as an appreciation of his VALOR. I take great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross... Awarded on June 25th 1919... John A Lejeune, Major General U.S.M.C., Commanding.

I thought maybe the Lejeune family would be interested in this, if any of them are still alive, anyway maybe someone would recall that day...

Semper Fi
Gy/Sgt. J.J. Johnston U.S.M.C. RET.


Occupied Japan

World War II ended and we entered Japan as Conquerors with Occupying Forces. The Japanese were obligated to follow the Rules of Occupation and the Occupying Soldiers had to obey the Regulations of the Occupying Forces. There was to be no Fraternization with the Enemy population and MP's made sure this was adhered to. All kinds of Secret Night Clubs sprang up. (I even went to one down through a Man Hole Cover) the Japanese formed Music (Jazz and Popular Music) groups and played in discreet and Unlawful Night Clubs.

One of the Japanese Bands was "Harry Kari" and his Six Saki Sippers (I have one of their records) and they played American hits sometimes changing the names of the songs and while you knew the Music, the singers sang in Japanese, sometimes the music was a bit off key and the singers mispronouncing words but to a homesick GI full of (GREAT) Japanese Beer loved it and fell in Love with some of the Beauties of Japan and tried to get Permission to Marry but that didn't happen for some years.

A Lieutenant friend fell in Love with a Japanese Singer that was Popular and applied for Permission to Marry Her. He was given the Option of Transfer or Forced out of the Marine Corps and the possibility of Marrying her. He took the option of Marrying her and left the Marine Corps, then he received Permission to Marry her and then had to Wait for her being allowed into the USA. That came about six months after he resigned as I remember.

Now I have to say something about "Yellow Footprints" or whatever they are. I never had Yellow Foot Prints to line up my feet on, I lined up or was put into position Quickly. My thoughts are; "Benny Sug's", a "Beneficial Suggestion" that someone was paid some Bucks for! Am I Right?

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Camera In Hand

On Thanksgiving Day 1967, I had been assigned to Chu Lai just 2 weeks earlier. I wasn't given a work assignment until the next day so I managed to be 3rd in line at the chow hall. A few of us looking inside saw a beautiful turkey on a tray with all the trimmings. Two of the Marines in front of me were selected to come in first and the turkey was set in front of them with the Mess Hall Sergeant holding the carving knife and fork. About that time the ISO officer, camera in hand, took a couple of pictures and left. The turkey was then removed and the doors were opened. When we came through the line we were given some canned turkey slices and everything else including some warm Kool aid. They did manage to set out some paper cups with nuts and candy for everyone so I wasn't too disappointed. Happy Thanksgiving to all my Marine brothers and sisters!

MSgt Gene Hays
USMC Retired


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #4)

Mom fixed 'Butter Beefsteak Sandwiches' a very quick and delicious way to fill your stomach. These had been a favorite in our family as far back as I could remember - and my memory is as sharp as a tack - I can remember details back to the age of three. (I shall digress to tell you that these were the predecessors to 'Philly Cheese Steaks' - but BETTER - made with butter instead of shortening. They are simple and quick. The beef is top sirloin sliced no thicker than 1/8 inch- thinner is better. You do not chop the meat. You cut it down to fit whatever you are putting it on. Our favorite has always been Kaiser rolls with poppy seeds- but any Kaiser rolls will do. Over the years sub rolls became popular - when Kaiser rolls were not on hand. You can use most anything - down to plain bread - but when you use plain bread you need a bale of paper napkins - the butter will ooze thru and you will have a very, very good 'oozy mess'. The recipe: Put a stick of butter in a skillet - over just enough heat to melt it. Put slices of beef in the butter until they are cooked through - not overcooked. When you have enough for a sandwich - 3 to 5 slices - you put them together and add a slice of provolone cheese - white American cheese - usually used on Philly Cheese Steaks - is acceptable - but not as good - and yellow American cheese is a 'no-no'. Cover for just long enough to start the cheese melting. Then put all this in between the Kaiser roll halves and enjoy. Believe me, you've never tasted anything better.

After dinner we sat in the living room. Mom told me where I would be sleeping. She said "You will not be sleeping in your own bed because my dear mother had disposed of it, but you already knew that. We purchased a new bedroom set for you with a new mattress set. I am sure you will like it. Dad and I sleep in the first bedroom at the top of the stairs. Your room is across from ours. Do you want to go up to see it?" I said "No, I can wait until we go to bed." Mom asked "You haven't forgotten the letter I gave you have you?" I told her "No I did not forget it. I think you are more anxious to know what is in it than I am. I will open it now." I got a knife and opened it. It was very short and I will never forget what it said. It was dated "Sept 4th" and said "Harold, Just a note to thank you for driving Stevie and I from Camp Lejeune to Washington. It proved to be a far more enjoyable trip than I had ever anticipated. Stevie is waiting for you to take him to the zoo. I have spoken so much about you that my sisters cannot wait to meet you. Please give us a call the next time you are in town. Affectionately, Kitty." I let my mother read it. She thought it was quite nice. I tossed it into the jewelry box on my dresser and it remained there for at least 25 years.

The odor of Shalimar perfume permeated the jewelry box and left no doubt in the years after this letter disappeared that it had been there. This had created a deep, dark mystery. How did Kitty get the address of The Hemlocks between 'Sept 4th' and the time she had to have mailed the letter which arrived on the 8th or 9th? I did not know that my parents were back from vacation and had purchased The Hemlocks until I returned from Indiana on the 11th and learned about all this from Mr.'B'. It's puzzling.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Anyone else get hungry after reading Master Gunny Freas's story's?

Semper Fi Master Gun's!

E5b
'79-'84


Neat how you got the name SGT Grit? Some of the black Marines called me SGT Faubus. He was the governor of Arkansas during the Central High School melee, back in the late 50's. I was in the Corps from 1960 to 1966.

Semper Fi,
Joe Pruitt
SGT USMC 1920xxx


Here's a follow-up to Jim Logan's post of your 12 Nov. newsletter: After Percy Price's victory in the ring over Cassius Clay, Clay suffered only five more defeats in the ring as Mohammed Ali - and two of those losses were to Ken Norton in '73 and Leon Spinks in'78. That's right - Three of his six losses were to Marines!

Gary Nash
0302 in the '60s


There is another Code Talker that is in the Phoenix, Arizona parade on Veterans Day, his name is Joe Kellwood.

DJ1948


Sarge thank you for continuing to send your weekly newsletter out. I enjoy reading it all and looking at your items on sale. Keep up the great work you started. Semper Fi Devil Dog, Job Well Done.


A wonderful multi-dimensional tribute to those who served in VietNam.

Vietnam: Service, Sacrifice, and Courage.

This video is 28 minutes long.

Submitted by:
Sgt. John Wear
Nam Tanker


Tommy "The Mad Marine". Read this article by Corey Kilgannon. "Long Ago, a Pilot Landed on an Uptown Street. That's Where the Bar Was".


Quotes

"Without liberty, law loses its nature and its name, and becomes oppression. Without law, liberty also loses its nature and its name, and becomes licentiousness."
--James Wilson, Of the Study of the Law in the United States, 1790


"It's not the stars or bars you have, not what you wear on your sleeve or shoulder that determines what you are. It's what you wear on you collar-The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor—that puts you in the brotherhood of the Marines."
--Brigadier General Carl Mundy, USMC


"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next five hundred years."
--James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy; 23 February 1945 (the flag-raising on Iwo Jima had been immortalized in a photograph by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal)


"I have just returned from visiting the Marines at the front, and there is not a finer fighting organization in the world!"
--General of the Armies Douglas MacArthur; Korea, 21 September 1950


"Do I look like a female sheep?"

"Outf-ckinstanding maggot!"

And what's your excuse numb nuts!
Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 27 Nov 2014
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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 27 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• Banana Wars and Tell Your Mother
• USO Shows
• The 12th General Order

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Sgt Grit and Staff would like to wish all Marines and their families a very safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving. May we all remember to pray for our brothers and sisters that are forward deployed so that we can enjoy this holiday season in true American fashion. May God bless you all and remember that "Every day is a holiday, Every meal is a feast, and Every paycheck is a fortune!"

Semper Fi!


Support​ vs Combat

I've often wondered what the ratio was for support troops vs combat troops. I've seen figures for Viet Nam ranging as high as 10-1. I think it's safe to say that is probably not far off the mark. (see the included article: Myths & Misconceptions: Vietnam War Folklore).

I've talked to more than a few Marines who served in a support position and occasionally the subject of regret over not having been in combat comes up. I have yet to find a single support Marine - REMF, in the rear with the gear and the beer and all the other derogatory comments about the jobs the non-03xx Marines did - who does not have some measure of regret that he never got the opportunity to take Charlie to the big dance and that includes myself. I can only tell you from my own perspective, about 98% of the time (80% of statistics are made up on the spot, as is that one – LOL) I am thankful my tour of duty did NOT include any combat. Judging only from what I've read and what I've heard, combat is some messed up sh-t. As always, you have my deepest appreciation for all you do for the Marine community.

Thanks & Semper Fi
Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Jerry D.


Banana Wars and Tell Your Mother

While working as a rifle instructor on the range at Camp Lejeune in 1955-7, I came to know and old Master Sergeant who ran the pistol range. He already had 30+ years in the Corps and was as crusty as they came. His name was Duncavage. Sometimes on the weekends he would come into the slopshoot and regale us with stories about the Banana Wars where he had served with Chesty Puller. He ran the pistol range with an iron hand. On every Monday when a new group of shooters reported in he would give a demonstration as to how to shoot the 45 automatic. On slow and rapid fire he would blast out the ten ring every time. Then he would go to the course where the target would face you for three seconds and then turn away. If you hit anywhere on the target you got points. Sergeant Duncavage would fire ten rounds in this course but it looked like he was missing the target completely. Titters would be heard from those watching the demonstration. "The old bast-rd missed the target completely," someone would say. But then when the targets were pulled in to be examined there they were--ten perfect shots in the head of the target where no one was looking. He pulled that on every group of shooters who came to his range.

One Monday a new group of shooters came in among whom was a bushy tailed 2nd Lieutenant, probably fresh out of Quantico. When Duncavage walked by the Lieutenant without saluting him (we old hands knew that on the ranges you didn't have to salute any officer below field grade, but this young shave-tail apparently didn't know that). The Lieutenant called Sergeant Duncavage back and asked why he hadn't saluted him. Sergeant Duncavage snapped to attention and rendered the appropriate highball. The Lieutenant began to walk away triumphant but Sergeant Duncavage called after him, "Now go home and tell your mother you met a real Marine!" You couldn't make up a story like that.

S/Sgt. Paul E. Gill, 1954-68


USO Shows

Sgt. Grit,

In my 27 Years of Service I've seen a lot of USO shows (actually this is the term used for all shows shown to us in a War Zone). Top Actors during the 1920's, 30's, 40's made USO Shows during WWII, most of them went to the European War. I did get to see Bob Hope, Jack Carson and some lesser named Actors, but not often. Now in Vietnam most of the military men were not familiar with this group but the Girls were Pretty with short dresses and did a shimmy or two. This was the Group Al Jolson (WHO?) put together and sent to Vietnam. No l didn't see Al, Jolson was a big hit during the 1920's and 1930's, and he died in the 1950's so he wasn't there, but if you have a Group and a Manager who's still around, they could be sent to perform for us. You can see the guys enjoying seeing the girls.

Earlier that week Recon brought in a Prisoner (note the Ho Chi Minh sandals) and we even polished our boots in Vietnam as you can see.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Iwo Jima Marines

This year at Cookies Tavern in South Philadelphia, PA, there were two Iwo Jima Marines that joined with other brother and sister Marines to celebrate our 239th Birthday!

Semper Fi


Reward Was An Orange

While going through Staging Battalion at Las Pulgas, one of the courses was Escape and Evasion. As I remember it we had to go from one hill down to a valley and up to the summit of another hill without being captured by the aggressors, who happened to be reservists. We were allowed a bayonet and poncho and the reward for completing the course was an orange. It was nearing dark and the instructor pointed out to us the smudge pot on the hill where we would receive our piece of fruit. It didn't look that far away, but was I wrong. We got the word to take off and as we started to descend the hill I could hear others mumbling that there was no way some weekend warrior is going to capture me when I'm off to WESTPAC. I wasn't half way down the hill when I began stumbling over all kinds of vegetation and brush and before I knew it I was at the bottom of the hill. Now the fun begins as I had to circumvent a creek and start up the hill. The aggressors were yelling surrender, give it up, it isn't worth it. Many did surrender, but not me. I'm grabbing onto branches and whatever I could feel in the dark. Suddenly the bushes in front of me started erupting and I didn't know what to make of it, so I got into the prone position, placed the poncho over my head and had the bayonet at the ready. I peeked from under the poncho and two eyes were staring at me as a very large owl came swooping down. Back under the poncho. Well, I eventually made it to the top, bloodied, mud head to toe along with torn utility trousers. I was handed my orange and the individual walked away shaking his head. I looked around and saw many of the Marines I had started off with huddled around the smudge pot shivering in their ponchos, but no oranges. Was I the only idiot who completed this course? The big question in my mind was, was it worth it? With a few choice words and I do mean choice, I took my reward and flung it down the hill as the others watched, probably wondering what's this guy's problem.

Sgt. Joe Alvino, USMC


1954 Ford and 45 Years

I have seen in the past few newsletters, Marines sending pictures of their cars and trucks with items from your store. I have just completed a nut and bolt restoration/customizing of my 1954 Ford F-100. I wanted to have something special made to honor my friends, friends I made 45 years ago in a really ugly hooch. I had the honor and the privilege to be with 11th Marines and living, eating, a tad bit of drinking, and standing watch with Don Whitton, John Gugliotta, and Jim Fuller. We still speak and visit to this day.

I wanted a custom job done. I did not want just a decal. I contacted Sgt Grit's Custom Department and they had four challenge coins made for me exactly as I wanted them. On each wheel dust cap is an 11th Marines Regimental logo and below is engraved each of the names: Grit, Goog, Fuller, and Hunts. Perfect fit. I would urge you all to try the custom department. If you can dream it, they can do it.

And yes, everyone notices the caps.

SSgt Dan Huntsinger
USMC '68-'74
11th Marines, DaNang '69-'70


Bea Arthur

In July 2009, a Jerry D. was telling all about famous people that contributed to Society but have also earned "The Title", he mentions Bea Arthur (Golden Girls) having categorically denied she was a Marine. Here is an update w/pic:

DECEMBER 9 - While she strangely denied serving in the armed forces, military records show that the actress Bea Arthur spent 30 months in the Marine Corps, where she was one of the first members of the Women's Reserve and spent time as a typist and a truck driver.

The "Maude" and "The Golden Girls" star, who died last year at age 86, enlisted in early-1943 when she was 21 (and known as Bernice Frankel). In a February 1943 letter included in her Marine personnel file, Arthur gave military officials a brief account of her prior employment as a food analyst at a Maryland packing plant, a hospital lab technician, and an office worker at a New York loan company.

Arthur was due to start a new job, but she "heard last week that enlistments for women in the Marines were open, so decided the only thing to do was to join." While she hoped for an assignment in ground aviation, Arthur noted that she was "willing to get in now and do whatever is desired of me until such time as ground schools are organized." She added, "As far as hobbies are concerned, I've dabbled in music and dramatics."

As part of the enlistment process, Arthur underwent interviews that resulted in the production of "personality appraisal" sheets. One such analysis described her conversation as "Argumentative" and her attitude and manner as "Over aggressive." In a handwritten note, the Marine interviewer remarked, "Officious - but probably a good worker - if she has her own way!"

Arthur is pictured here in an official Marine photo taken shortly after her enlistment. A second undated portrait can be seen above.

Semper Fi
Rusty Norman
Echo 2/9 1969
USMC 1966-


The 12th General Order

By Ken Zebal

In the early 1960s, 2nd Tank Bn had a well-established fire watch program at the tank park. Generally speaking, two lower-ranking Marines from the flames platoon and each gun company were posted at the tank park inside their respective tool sheds from about 1800 to 0600. I was a PFC at the time and was assigned fire watch for Charlie Company along with Pat Rogers. Pat and I went to boot camp at Parris Island together (Aug-Nov '63) and then to ITR at Camp Geiger (Nov-Dec '63) before reporting into Co "C", 2TkBn (Dec '63) and then going on boot leave. This was my first fire watch and may also have been Pat's. We were nominated by our Platoon Sergeant, S/Sgt "Gunny" Jandrozits, and then hand-selected by the Company Gunny, GySgt Sam Fullerton whose sea bag read like a WWII war novel. After everyone else went on liberty call Pat and I were briefed by the Company Gunny, went to Mess Hall 207 across the street and were issued mid-rats. In those days it was a brown paper sack filled with a sandwich, hard-boiled egg, apple, container of milk and a napkin all lovingly prepared by one of the cooks.

Along with the other fire watches we reported to the Battalion CP and the Officer of the Day. The OD that day was a WWII and Korea vintage Master Sergeant in Winter Service Alphas. The fire watches were in utilities, green wool shirts, field jackets, gloves and had mid-rats. We received our instructions from the OD and took that short 15 minute walk to the tank park. After getting settled in and looking around we lit the kerosene stove and hung out with nothing else to do for the next 11 hours and 30 minutes. Oh there was the occasional snapping of an M-103 torsion bar but other than that it was quiet. Pat may have had a portable radio so we could listen to WCBS and KDKA, but I don't recall us being quite that salty yet. Every now and again we would take turns walking around the tank ramp just to get some fresh air but it was really boring. About 2200 or so the OD (MSgt what's-his-name) came to check post. Pat and I popped to attention and reported "Charlie Company all secure with nothing unusual to report." The MSgt comes up to me and asks if I knew my 10th General Order, I responded (to salute all officers and all colors and standards not cased). So then he asked why I didn't salute him since he was the OD. Well that was easy, I said because you're enlisted. I thought it was a trick question. He seemed a bit put off by my response so we went through a brief question and answer session with him asking the questions and me providing seemingly unsatisfactory answers. In the meantime, Pat was edging towards the hatch, tank ramp and safety. It didn't take long for the OD to leave and for me and Pat to review the situation. Pat kept saying "if you would have just saluted him, he would have gone away happy." After morning formation the next day, I got to meet the 1st Sgt and for some unknown reason he seemed a bit grumpy. I attributed it to him being old but really did admire his herringbone utilities – what we used to call dungarees. Being a PFC with about 6 months in the Corps I admired everything salty. He jumped right to business without even asking how I was doing and whether or not I liked the Martine Corps, or what he could do to make my enlistment a more pleasant experience. He also really didn't seem all that interested in my perspective of things – maybe he had other things on his mind. However, he did seem fixated on the rank structure and my position at the bottom which he kept mentioning over and over. All in all I guess that didn't go as well as it could have. About a week later I was once again nominated and hand-selected, but this time it was for 30 days of mess duty, clearly a sign that my fledgling career was progressing.

Note: From time to time I will reprint a story from the USMC Tanker Association newsletter.

Sgt Grit

The Assoc. National Recruiter is:
Greg Martin
Email: usmctanker[at]comcast.net
Phone: 360-480-1206


Ranks Can Be Deceiving

I've been following with interest the comments posted here, re Marines graduating boot camp with rank. When I graduated more than six decades ago, one of the Marines I enlisted with received his corporal chevrons because he was prior service in WWII. In fact, the guide for another platoon in our series came out with three stripes.

Coming back from Korea, I was sent TAD to the base PIO at Pendleton to write features stories on reserve units receiving their summer drills for their hometown media. One of the other Marines in our office was a SSgt. He had gone the "O" route, but prior to commissioning it was discovered that the university he attended in one of the Central American countries was not accredited.

In short, ranks for newbee Marines can be deceiving. BTW. My youngest son was guaranteed PFC because of college credit when he enlisted some 25 years ago.

Semper Fi,
Bob Rader #140xxxx
God Bless America and the U.S. Marine Corps


Lost And Found

I went through boot camp at Parris Island in the summer and fall of 1960. Then on to combat training at Camp Geiger. I was sent from there to 2nd Bat, 6th Marines at Camp Lejeune, NC and served as a rifleman until I transferred to Quantico as an instructor in 1963. I was discharged in July of 1963. I would like to contact some of the guys I served with but only remember a few of their names. We were in Fox and Golf co. Ralph Demaio, and Charlie Drummy were my close buddies and would appreciate hearing from anybody who remembers them as well as me.

Roland G. Pelletier, LCpl
also known as Pellie or Professor


Honoring My Dad

Sgt Grit,

I am a proud son of a fallen Marine. My Dad served in Korea and was killed in Vietnam. He spent 16 years in the Corps. My Mom did not want me to join but I do volunteer with some Veterans groups to Honor my Dad. I also go down to Washington on the 10th and 11th of November to pay my respects. This year wearing some Grit gear I was told since I did not serve I should not wear it. I always wear my Gold Star pin and tell anyone who asks I did not serve but that I am Honoring my Dad. I would like to hear from you and your readers on this.

Mike Cruden
Son of S/Sgt Donald J Cruden, USMC KIA 12/27/67


Visited Your Warehouse

Dear Sgt. Grit,

My fiance and I visited the warehouse on November 6th. For many years Robert has wanted to visit and to meet Sgt. Grit in person. We loved the shop, his collection, Sgt Grit himself, and the staff made us feel right at home. Thanks for doing all that you do and for being there for your fellow Marines.

I have attached a picture of my fiance and Sgt. Grit.

Thanks again!
Semper Fi


My Son

For all of those that have sons or daughters at boot camp let me pass on what I found. Let me give you a little background first. When my son left home he had no motivation, he was lazy, slobby, no pride, no self-worth. This is the boy that got off the bus March 18th at Parris Island. The man that I met on Thursday for parent's day is AWESOME. There is no way I can describe to you all the difference. He looks different, he walks different, he talks different, he has such a sense of bearing and pride all I could do was look at him in awe. Oh yes, the training is hard, what he went through is unimaginable to any one that has not been there. They are definitely taught to be Warriors. Let me tell you the surprise of what else they are taught. My Marine son has better values, better morals, better manners than anyone I know. It is so much more than Yes Sir, Yes Mam... so much more. He cares about how he looks, he cares about what he does, and it's not a boastful, bad azs thing. He is a true gentleman. I saw patience, and a calmness in him that I have never seen. I could never express my gratitude enough to the Marine Corps for what they have given my son. I know this, I have an 11 year old Devil pup still at home. When the time comes for his turn if I had to I would take him kicking and screaming all the way. Although I'm sure that will not happen. The hero worship I see in my younger son's eyes for his Marine brother tells me I will have two Marines in the family, and I will be one very proud mother.

"Cybil", Mother of a Marine writing to the myMarine Group
Submitted many years ago, thought I would reprint.


General Lejeune

Sgt Grit,

My dad served with General Lejeune In France during WW1 at the Meuse-Argonne, he was with the 2nd Indian Head Division, U.S. Army, Signal Corp, Master Sergeant. The General Requested him to operate the station and handle all telegraph and coded messages. Later on at Blanc Monte on Oct. 3, 1918 in operations of the A.E.F. (I shortened it) in testimony thereof as an appreciation of his VALOR. I take great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross... Awarded on June 25th 1919... John A Lejeune, Major General U.S.M.C., Commanding.

I thought maybe the Lejeune family would be interested in this, if any of them are still alive, anyway maybe someone would recall that day...

Semper Fi
Gy/Sgt. J.J. Johnston U.S.M.C. RET.


Occupied Japan

World War II ended and we entered Japan as Conquerors with Occupying Forces. The Japanese were obligated to follow the Rules of Occupation and the Occupying Soldiers had to obey the Regulations of the Occupying Forces. There was to be no Fraternization with the Enemy population and MP's made sure this was adhered to. All kinds of Secret Night Clubs sprang up. (I even went to one down through a Man Hole Cover) the Japanese formed Music (Jazz and Popular Music) groups and played in discreet and Unlawful Night Clubs.

One of the Japanese Bands was "Harry Kari" and his Six Saki Sippers (I have one of their records) and they played American hits sometimes changing the names of the songs and while you knew the Music, the singers sang in Japanese, sometimes the music was a bit off key and the singers mispronouncing words but to a homesick GI full of (GREAT) Japanese Beer loved it and fell in Love with some of the Beauties of Japan and tried to get Permission to Marry but that didn't happen for some years.

A Lieutenant friend fell in Love with a Japanese Singer that was Popular and applied for Permission to Marry Her. He was given the Option of Transfer or Forced out of the Marine Corps and the possibility of Marrying her. He took the option of Marrying her and left the Marine Corps, then he received Permission to Marry her and then had to Wait for her being allowed into the USA. That came about six months after he resigned as I remember.

Now I have to say something about "Yellow Footprints" or whatever they are. I never had Yellow Foot Prints to line up my feet on, I lined up or was put into position Quickly. My thoughts are; "Benny Sug's", a "Beneficial Suggestion" that someone was paid some Bucks for! Am I Right?

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


Camera In Hand

On Thanksgiving Day 1967, I had been assigned to Chu Lai just 2 weeks earlier. I wasn't given a work assignment until the next day so I managed to be 3rd in line at the chow hall. A few of us looking inside saw a beautiful turkey on a tray with all the trimmings. Two of the Marines in front of me were selected to come in first and the turkey was set in front of them with the Mess Hall Sergeant holding the carving knife and fork. About that time the ISO officer, camera in hand, took a couple of pictures and left. The turkey was then removed and the doors were opened. When we came through the line we were given some canned turkey slices and everything else including some warm Kool aid. They did manage to set out some paper cups with nuts and candy for everyone so I wasn't too disappointed. Happy Thanksgiving to all my Marine brothers and sisters!

MSgt Gene Hays
USMC Retired


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #4)

Mom fixed 'Butter Beefsteak Sandwiches' a very quick and delicious way to fill your stomach. These had been a favorite in our family as far back as I could remember - and my memory is as sharp as a tack - I can remember details back to the age of three. (I shall digress to tell you that these were the predecessors to 'Philly Cheese Steaks' - but BETTER - made with butter instead of shortening. They are simple and quick. The beef is top sirloin sliced no thicker than 1/8 inch- thinner is better. You do not chop the meat. You cut it down to fit whatever you are putting it on. Our favorite has always been Kaiser rolls with poppy seeds- but any Kaiser rolls will do. Over the years sub rolls became popular - when Kaiser rolls were not on hand. You can use most anything - down to plain bread - but when you use plain bread you need a bale of paper napkins - the butter will ooze thru and you will have a very, very good 'oozy mess'. The recipe: Put a stick of butter in a skillet - over just enough heat to melt it. Put slices of beef in the butter until they are cooked through - not overcooked. When you have enough for a sandwich - 3 to 5 slices - you put them together and add a slice of provolone cheese - white American cheese - usually used on Philly Cheese Steaks - is acceptable - but not as good - and yellow American cheese is a 'no-no'. Cover for just long enough to start the cheese melting. Then put all this in between the Kaiser roll halves and enjoy. Believe me, you've never tasted anything better.

After dinner we sat in the living room. Mom told me where I would be sleeping. She said "You will not be sleeping in your own bed because my dear mother had disposed of it, but you already knew that. We purchased a new bedroom set for you with a new mattress set. I am sure you will like it. Dad and I sleep in the first bedroom at the top of the stairs. Your room is across from ours. Do you want to go up to see it?" I said "No, I can wait until we go to bed." Mom asked "You haven't forgotten the letter I gave you have you?" I told her "No I did not forget it. I think you are more anxious to know what is in it than I am. I will open it now." I got a knife and opened it. It was very short and I will never forget what it said. It was dated "Sept 4th" and said "Harold, Just a note to thank you for driving Stevie and I from Camp Lejeune to Washington. It proved to be a far more enjoyable trip than I had ever anticipated. Stevie is waiting for you to take him to the zoo. I have spoken so much about you that my sisters cannot wait to meet you. Please give us a call the next time you are in town. Affectionately, Kitty." I let my mother read it. She thought it was quite nice. I tossed it into the jewelry box on my dresser and it remained there for at least 25 years.

The odor of Shalimar perfume permeated the jewelry box and left no doubt in the years after this letter disappeared that it had been there. This had created a deep, dark mystery. How did Kitty get the address of The Hemlocks between 'Sept 4th' and the time she had to have mailed the letter which arrived on the 8th or 9th? I did not know that my parents were back from vacation and had purchased The Hemlocks until I returned from Indiana on the 11th and learned about all this from Mr.'B'. It's puzzling.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Anyone else get hungry after reading Master Gunny Freas's story's?

Semper Fi Master Gun's!

E5b
'79-'84


Neat how you got the name SGT Grit? Some of the black Marines called me SGT Faubus. He was the governor of Arkansas during the Central High School melee, back in the late 50's. I was in the Corps from 1960 to 1966.

Semper Fi,
Joe Pruitt
SGT USMC 1920xxx


Here's a follow-up to Jim Logan's post of your 12 Nov. newsletter: After Percy Price's victory in the ring over Cassius Clay, Clay suffered only five more defeats in the ring as Mohammed Ali - and two of those losses were to Ken Norton in '73 and Leon Spinks in'78. That's right - Three of his six losses were to Marines!

Gary Nash
0302 in the '60s


There is another Code Talker that is in the Phoenix, Arizona parade on Veterans Day, his name is Joe Kellwood.

DJ1948


Sarge thank you for continuing to send your weekly newsletter out. I enjoy reading it all and looking at your items on sale. Keep up the great work you started. Semper Fi Devil Dog, Job Well Done.


A wonderful multi-dimensional tribute to those who served in VietNam.

Vietnam: Service, Sacrifice, and Courage.

This video is 28 minutes long.

Submitted by:
Sgt. John Wear
Nam Tanker


Tommy "The Mad Marine". Read this article by Corey Kilgannon. "Long Ago, a Pilot Landed on an Uptown Street. That's Where the Bar Was".


Quotes

"Without liberty, law loses its nature and its name, and becomes oppression. Without law, liberty also loses its nature and its name, and becomes licentiousness."
--James Wilson, Of the Study of the Law in the United States, 1790


"It's not the stars or bars you have, not what you wear on your sleeve or shoulder that determines what you are. It's what you wear on you collar-The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor—that puts you in the brotherhood of the Marines."
--Brigadier General Carl Mundy, USMC


"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next five hundred years."
--James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy; 23 February 1945 (the flag-raising on Iwo Jima had been immortalized in a photograph by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal)


"I have just returned from visiting the Marines at the front, and there is not a finer fighting organization in the world!"
--General of the Armies Douglas MacArthur; Korea, 21 September 1950


"Do I look like a female sheep?"

"Outf-ckinstanding maggot!"

And what's your excuse numb nuts!
Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 20 NOV 2014

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 20 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• The Duke, Chu Lai 1966
• Improvised Detector Dog
• Lejeune (luh-jern)

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Cpl Jahnoff and Navajo Code Talker Samuel Holiday

What a wonderful 239th Marine Corps birthday event:

This morning I met and conversed with an ultimate WWII Marine Corps Pacific War veteran, Navajo Code Talker SAMUEL HOLIDAY!

This Marine was at the American Legion Post in Wickenburg, AZ, promoting his book, "Under The Eagle". My wife Shirley and I spoke for some time with 90 year old Samuel and his daughter, Lupita. Lord, he seemed to be wearing as many ribbons as Col. Puller!

I have to admit it folks, meeting and talking with this combat vet of, among other places, Kwajalein, Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima was a truly heart-grabbing experience!

SEMPER FI!

Cpl. Carl Johnoff, 1956-present.


Another Glorious Day In The Corps

Sir! We wish to thank the Drill Instructors for another glorious day in the Marine Corps where every day is a holiday, every meal is a feast, and every paycheck is a fortune!

Gung Ho!
Gung Ho!
Gung Ho!

Norm Spilleth

Drill Instructors PI 1960


The Duke, Chu Lai 1966

The Duke in country blowing the froth off a couple with the Troops. Bringing a whole new meaning to "The Few​".

John Ratomski

The Duke John Wayne In Chu Lai, Vietnam


USMC Grunt Coin


Improvised Detector Dog

Marine Veteran Anthony Marquez

Allie IDD Dog

So Allie was an IDD dog which is an "improvised explosive detector dog" she did 4 combat deployments with Marine units. I was her handler from January 2011 to October 2011. We were deployed to Sangin, Afghanistan from late march 2011 to October 19th 2011 with 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines. She recently was retired from active duty where I was contacted and adopted her from the IDD program where I had to pick her up in Jackson Springs, North Carolina. Now she's just relaxing and living a dog's life.

Anthony Marquez
USMC
Afghanistan Vet


Sgt Jason Pacheco

Sgt Pacheco was shot by a sniper and ended up losing his leg, so he got a new one... and then, he signed up for his second tour in Iraq!

This is what we call Out-friggin'-standing!

Marine Veteran Sgt Jason Pacheco


Marine Corps Tie Knot

My tie knot.

Sgt Denny Krause
Vietnam 65 and Paris Embassy

Sgt Denny Krause with his Marine Corps tie knot


I Didn't Realize

I left college on a leave of absence in January, 1971. While waiting the four months before leaving for Parris Island, I was an orderly in the men's wing of a rehab hospital. One of my patients was an elderly man who was recovering from a knee replacement. In passing, I found out the he had been a Marine machine gunner in WWI. If only I knew then what I know now I would have taken more time to reminisce with him. I didn't realize that I was caring for one of the heroes from our illustrious past.

Bob Hunt
Major (Mustang)
1971-1989​


Montford Point U.S. Marines

They were the first African Americans to serve as U.S. Marines. There are over 40 chapters nationwide. We are starting a chapter he in Greenville, Mississippi. Montford Point Marines are a non-profit organization dedicated to uplifting Veterans of all branches and supporting the communities in which we live.

To join you must have received an honorable discharge from any branch of the Armed Services. To find out more, call former Lance Corporal Ralph Jones at: (662) 822-2546. View the national website at: www.montfordpointmarines.com.

We will start a Montford Point Marines Women's Auxillery. We don't need all of your time, just what you can contribute.


Marine Fishing Joke

The rain was pouring and there was a big puddle in front of the pub just outside the Navy Base. A ragged old Marine Gunnery Sgt. was standing near the edge with a fishing rod, his line in the puddle. A curious young Navy fighter pilot came over to him and asked what he was doing.

"Fishing," the old guy simply said.
"Poor old fool," the Navy officer thought and he invited the ragged old Marine into the pub for a drink. As he felt he should start some conversation while they were sipping their whisky, the smart-ass fighter pilot asked, "And how many have you caught?" "You're the eighth," the old Marine Gunny answered.

Submitted by:
Sgt John Wear
Vietnam Tanker


Veteran Suicide Prevention Challenge​

Tony Hogrefe, great job in this vid!

View this at Veteran Suicide Prevention Challenge.


Vietnam Veteran

Cpl Peterson aboard ship

Cpl Peterson shaving next to jeep in Vietnam

Memories of my time in service.

Semper Fi
Cpl D.E. Peterson
1972/1978


Lejeune (luh-jern)

The Lejeune (luh-jern) family would like respect & honor returned to the General's great name. Herein for your review is the gouge, substantiating that we have a generation who have been, sadly, off target... it is remedial action time as well as time to honor and respect one outstanding leatherneck... please pass the word... the Lejeune (luh-jern) family would love it.


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This Is A Monumental Day

Sgt. Grit,

For me, this is a monumental day. Today, I'm celebrating my 50th Marine Corps Birthday. To many, I'm a boot and 50 birthdays falls short of what many of my Marine brothers have celebrated. Unless you have been there, it's impossible to explain life as Marine. I think the easiest way to explain it is to say that: Every formation is a family get-together, every meal is a banquet, and every night is a Saturday night.

I've been retired from the "Corps" longer than I was on active duty, but I continue to long for those foot-loose, fancy-free days when my only responsibility was to my fellow Marines, God, "Corps" and country (not necessarily in that order). Life seemed so much easier then. I had much less money in my pocket then than I do now, but OH - the good times. I've had the pleasure of traveling to 38 different countries as an Infantry Marine, on many different missions, usually training. Then there are the cities - from Subic Bay, Olongopo (sic) around the world to Venice and Rome, Italy, Athens, Greece, Hong Kong and many more in between, crossed the equator twice.

Needless to say, the incredible, disciplined, courageous, Marines I've had the professional pleasure to serve with are much too numerous to list here. Your newsletter just isn't big enough to list them all. Suffice it to write that I've served with Medal of Honor recipients, as well as some of lesser renown, but all were Marines (title earned not given) dedicated to the values we hold so dear.

Least I not forget that there were some bad times too. I saw Marines die in far away lands. My hurt continues to go out to the families who lost their Marine in combat because of Marines' dedication to God, "Corps" and country. I don't see that changing any time soon. I don't remember all their names, but I vividly remember the agony we all experienced because of the loss of a Marine brother. There is no drug of any type that can assuage the grief of those tough times.

No, I'm not crying in my beer. I'm thankful to have lived the life I have lived.

Now, to my reason for writing - I wish to all my fellow Marines a very, very Happy Birthday. I'm honored to hold the title Marine. I'm honored to be a small part of the Marine brotherhood. All will die someday, but we will die MARINES, now and forever.

Semper Fi,
A former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


A Game Of Hide-And-Seek

NAME

This photo was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page this past week. It displays a Marine holding a combat shotgun while looking around a corner. The text on the photo reads "When is a game of hide-and-seek not fair? When you choose to play the game with a U.S. Marine! Semper Fi!"

Here are some of the responses left by fans of our Facebook page:


Mark Hayes - use the mark19 to find their dumb azses.


Howard Andrews - Ali Ali in free!


Raul-Maria Garza - Lock and load!


David Miller Lesley - Oh hell ya... Blackhearts love playing this game.


Rock Hornbuckle - I still prefer the original WWI "trench gun" used by the Marines in France. The model 97 Winchester. We used the M870 in Vietnam.


Aaron Baltosser - Tag, you're it!


View more of the comment that were left about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Edenton, NC

In reference to the letter from Sgt R.Nowicki, I arrived at USMC air station Edenton, NC during October 1957. I had just completed ATA school Memphis, TN, Naval air station and was assigned to VMA 211. We were just recieving the A4 Skyhawks as were VMA 225 the other group stationed at Edenton. It was great duty at the time but then during 1958 the base was going to close and the 2 squadrons were sent to EL Toro. I was transferred to H&MS14 and went to Cherry Point after the base was closed in late '58. I got out in '59 when the Marines were doing a severe cut back. I passed thru Edenton about 5 years ago and it is now a beautiful small town very different from when I would go on liberty there. The air station is now a small county airport.

Semper Fi
Bob Sullivan (Sully)


Platoon 428, 1952​

I am the proud 59 year wife of a retired USMC Mustang Major. 3 years ago he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease and his short term memory is almost totally gone. However, we were fortunate enough to attend MCRD Graduation 2 weeks ago. He was a particpant there 62 years ago (Platoon 428, 1952, San Diego) and it brought back so many memories for him. His Drill Instructors were Sgt. R. M. Latham and Sgt. J. C. McCormack. He has a photo of the platoon but does not have the book. If there is anyone out there who has a copy they would sell, I would pay any price for it as it would be the very best gift for him under the tree. It would bring back so many memories for him as he is so proud to be a Marine, and I know those memories will stay with him long after others are gone!

My husband, Ron, served in Viet Nam at An Hoa in '69-'70 & would love to hear from his fellow Marines who served there with him in the 5th Marines. He does not read the newsletter much anymore, but I read it faithfully and call his attention to various items. Thanks again for all you do and God bless you and Yours​.

Bernice Delabarre
rbdfrbc@centurylink.net


MCM Skydive

Sgt Grit,

Check out the link below from the MCM skydive we did in D.C. two weeks ago. Cpl Carpenter (Medal of Honor) is a super representative of our Country and Corps...

We got to see D.C. from a perspective few others will ever see...

Sadly, the clip editor can't spell "Corps".

Semper Fidelis,
John

P.S. Always enjoy your newsletters...

​View the video at Team Fastrax opens the Marine Corp Marathon 2014


Duck And Deer Hunting In Korea

I went to Korea ending up at 1st Combat Service Group, we furnished weapons to the lines and once had to ready (60) .50 caliber machine guns and (50) .30 caliber machine guns to the lines. Weapons put in storage at that time were covered with Cosmoline (a tar like substance) and had to be soaked in solvent to get the cosmoline off (we didn't have any solvent so we used gasoline.) Many of the weapons were from WWII, (having been stored since then and had to be repaired as well), they were soaked in Gasoline. We wore rubber aprons but still were soaked with gasoline from head to toe.

We worked for over 24 hours to get the weapons to the lines for the latest battles with Communist Forces of North Korea. There were other times we worked day and night to supply weapons and what ever was needed, sometimes we had to help supply to get weapons or other supplies ready to ship by truck or plane. Thirty days before I was to return home, I was sent to a Fire Station in Masan where we drove Six-By trucks converted to Fire Trucks that held about a thousand gallons of water.

We were sent to the docks when wood stored by Koreans for Winter somehow had started burning. I took one truck and pushed piles of the burning wood into the water. Koreans went out in boats trying to save as much wood as they could. We even fought fires at Korean Houses where Kim Chee was buried to ferment. There was an old saying in the Marine Corps that went; "Screwed up like a Chinese Fire Drill." I found the background for that saying. There were no fire hydrants in the streets of cities, but there were manhole covers over water. Going to a fire the Korean Fire Truck would come to one of these man hole covers, a Korean Fireman would jump off the back of the fire truck with a mat to cushion his fall, he carried a hose from the truck and would open a man hole, dropping the hose into the water so it could be sucked out to fight the fire. Our fire fighting methods were so advanced to the Koreans at that time.

There were Korean displaced people that lived as best they could in cardboard box homes. They did whatever and wherever they could to survive the terribly cold winters. Special Services told us we could go hunting. We could hunt the Korean Deer (which were about the size of German sheppard dogs) or we could go duck hunting. We tried the deer hunting and got two deer which were cleaned for us by some Korean farmers (of course we gave them lots of the meat). One of our cooks cooked the meat for our unit.

Then we went duck hunting. The ducks had never been hunted and were in large flocks, you would shoot, flocks of ducks would fly off and you could see where they went. We would drive to that area, fire a shotgun, when they flew up again, we would fire into the flock, then load the dead ducks into the back of a Six-By. We gave away many of the ducks to Koreans on the streets going back to camp. On these hunting expeditions we had to have at least three men armed with M1 Garands in case we were attacked by North Korean Gorilla's which were everywhere, but didn't attack a Marine Hunting Party.

My thirteen months in Korea came to an end. We were loaded on a ship and came home.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired​


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

Vol #11, #3

We talked and talked and talked until my Mom asked "What can I fix you for lunch?" (My Mom was always wanting to fix me something to eat. She must have thought that I was always hungry. And maybe I was.) I said "Why don't you let me take you two out for lunch?" (I knew this wouldn't work... she never wanted me to spend any money on them.) She went out into the kitchen to fix lunch. I said "I had told the B's I would see them later in the day, but I do not want to interfere with any of their meals. Lets leave here shortly after 2:00. How does that sound?" They said "That's okay." We left at about 2:15.

Dad said "Take my car. It hasn't moved since last Friday and it's a 4-door." I told him "I wish to H-ll mine was. I hate 2-door cars. I just didn't have much of a choice when I bought mine." I told Dad "Take Rt. 38 to Pine St, go left to Branch Ave., then go left again. The B's live just a few doors down on the right." We were there by 2:30. Only Mrs.'B' was home. She called Mr. 'B' and he said he would be there within the hour. As soon as we got to the B's house everyone recognized each other and were certain they had met at my high school graduation. That had to be right as I was unable to attend Mary's graduation in 1948 because I was still in school at Camp Lejeune. Mr.'B' was home before 3:30. He recognized my Mom and Dad instantly. The conversation quickly turned to their kids and the fact that we had been thinking of getting married. (I don't think I had told my parents of this revelation.) And it wasn't too long before Mrs.'B' blurted out "It is really beautiful how they sleep together with their arms all wrapped around each other." I could have crawled under a rock when she said that. My Mom looked at me. I knew that 'sleeping together' meant something else to her. She said nothing but I know she did not like what she had just heard. Mrs.'B' knew that we had chosen to live a Platonic lifestyle and I doubt that my Mom had ever heard the word 'Platonic'. Mrs.'B' soon realized that she had said something she should not have. She explained that she meant when we 'napped' together on the living room sofa. That cleared the air as best as it could under the circumstances.

The B's knew, of course, that we had slept together in Mary's bed upstairs, her Aunt Jen's bed in N.Y.C., in their own bed in Ocean City and at motels and hotels when I took Mary to college, but they had not seen us at those times. It was best that these not be brought up at this time or my mother would have gone into orbit. The B's asked us to stay and have dinner with them. My mother said "We appreciate the invitation but we have plans for dinner." I was not aware of any plans but kept quiet. When we were back in the car I asked Mom "What plans did we make?" She replied "We are eating at home. I wanted to get out of there as politely as possible." I did not wish to join them myself and I guess we managed to get out of there as easily as possible. We were back home by about 1700 and Mom went straight to the kitchen to prepare dinner. She did not say a word about Mary and I 'sleeping together'.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Lost And Found

If anyone was in Plt. 352 at Parris Island from July to Oct. in 1962, I would like to hear from you. This also includes our Drill Instructors. E-mail me atagirvin@rochester.rr.com.

Thanks Cpl. Art Girvin
USMC Semper Fi​


Short Rounds

The submission in this week's newsletter from Karen Balske brought back a lot of memories. I had the privilege of serving under Capt. Balske when he was CO of Alpha Battery, 2nd LAAM Bn. atthe Stumps. I was his admin. chief from October of 1968 until December of 1969. I recall a proud and dedicated Marine.

Jim Reese
Sgt. '67 to '71


In response to the story about DI SSgt Blankenship, I recall serving in Viet Nam '66-'67 with a Sgt Blankenship. I was assigned to 1st Marine Regt, S-2 and I believe he was with S-3. I don't know if they are the same person. It might be a "small world".

J Kanavy, Cpl


I really enjoyed the video, "Welcome Home" in your newsletter of November 12th. I'm glad our Military men and women of all the services are welcomed home in this beautiful manner. I hope it never changes. Sure beats the heck out of the way we were received coming back from 'Nam. Semper Fi to all my brothers and sisters.

GySgt J.J. Hinojosa, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
Pain is just fear leaving the body.


"If the Marine Corps wanted you to have a wife, they would have issued you one."

Thank goodness they don't. Like everything else issued in boot camp, you'd have to have it altered eventually.

John H. Hardin


I would like to wish the Marines past and present a Happy Birthday. It was an Honor to serve with the best.

Semper Fi,
Joe "Doc" Garcia
India Co 3/9 Viet Nam '65-'66


​Go have a slice (or two) of birthday cake and (if you are a good litle Marine) maybe a small drink to wash it down. Celebrate as you have earned it!

Gary L. COON
MSgt USMC (Ret)
0902, 10 Nov 14


Quotes

"Marines know how to use their bayonets. Army bayonets may as well be paper-weights."
--Navy Times; November 1994


"The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits."
--Albert Einstein


"Why in hell can't the Army do it if the Marines can. They are the same kind of men; why can't they be like Marines."
--Gen. John J. "Black Jack" Pershing, USA; 12 February 1918


Thomas Jefferson Quote


"The United States Marine Corps, with its fiercely proud tradition of excellence in combat, its hallowed rituals, and its unbending code of honor, is part of the fabric of American myth."
--Thomas E. Ricks; Making the Corps, 1997


"You best get your f-cking eyeballs off me... do you have cranial rectal inversion."

"There will only be 7 planets left after I destroy uranus!"

"You eye-f-cking me boy?"

God Bless the American Dream!
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

 
©2014 Sgt Grit Inc
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Oklahoma City, OK 73179
888-NOV-1775
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Sgt Grit Newsletter 20 NOV 2014
If you are having trouble viewing this issue, see it on our website:
http://www.grunt.com/corps/newsletter/10312/

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 20 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• The Duke, Chu Lai 1966
• Improvised Detector Dog
• Lejeune (luh-jern)

Online Store TShirts Men's Headgear Patches Women's

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What a wonderful 239th Marine Corps birthday event:

This morning I met and conversed with an ultimate WWII Marine Corps Pacific War veteran, Navajo Code Talker SAMUEL HOLIDAY!

This Marine was at the American Legion Post in Wickenburg, AZ, promoting his book, "Under The Eagle". My wife Shirley and I spoke for some time with 90 year old Samuel and his daughter, Lupita. Lord, he seemed to be wearing as many ribbons as Col. Puller!

I have to admit it folks, meeting and talking with this combat vet of, among other places, Kwajalein, Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima was a truly heart-grabbing experience!

SEMPER FI!

Cpl. Carl Johnoff, 1956-present.


Another Glorious Day In The Corps

Sir! We wish to thank the Drill Instructors for another glorious day in the Marine Corps where every day is a holiday, every meal is a feast, and every paycheck is a fortune!

Gung Ho!
Gung Ho!
Gung Ho!

Norm Spilleth


The Duke, Chu Lai 1966

The Duke in country blowing the froth off a couple with the Troops. Bringing a whole new meaning to "The Few​".

John Ratomski


Improvised Detector Dog

So Allie was an IDD dog which is an "improvised explosive detector dog" she did 4 combat deployments with Marine units. I was her handler from January 2011 to October 2011. We were deployed to Sangin, Afghanistan from late march 2011 to October 19th 2011 with 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines. She recently was retired from active duty where I was contacted and adopted her from the IDD program where I had to pick her up in Jackson Springs, North Carolina. Now she's just relaxing and living a dog's life.

Anthony Marquez
USMC
Afghanistan Vet


Sgt Jason Pacheco

Sgt Pacheco was shot by a sniper and ended up losing his leg, so he got a new one... and then, he signed up for his second tour in Iraq!

This is what we call Out-friggin'-standing!


Marine Corps Tie Knot

My tie knot.

Sgt Denny Krause
Vietnam 65 and Paris Embassy


I Didn't Realize

I left college on a leave of absence in January, 1971. While waiting the four months before leaving for Parris Island, I was an orderly in the men's wing of a rehab hospital. One of my patients was an elderly man who was recovering from a knee replacement. In passing, I found out the he had been a Marine machine gunner in WWI. If only I knew then what I know now I would have taken more time to reminisce with him. I didn't realize that I was caring for one of the heroes from our illustrious past.

Bob Hunt
Major (Mustang)
1971-1989​


Montford Point U.S. Marines

They were the first African Americans to serve as U.S. Marines. There are over 40 chapters nationwide. We are starting a chapter he in Greenville, Mississippi. Montford Point Marines are a non-profit organization dedicated to uplifting Veterans of all branches and supporting the communities in which we live.

To join you must have received an honorable discharge from any branch of the Armed Services. To find out more, call former Lance Corporal Ralph Jones at: (662) 822-2546. View the national website at: www.montfordpointmarines.com.

We will start a Montford Point Marines Women's Auxillery. We don't need all of your time, just what you can contribute.


Marine Fishing Joke

The rain was pouring and there was a big puddle in front of the pub just outside the Navy Base. A ragged old Marine Gunnery Sgt. was standing near the edge with a fishing rod, his line in the puddle. A curious young Navy fighter pilot came over to him and asked what he was doing.

"Fishing," the old guy simply said.
"Poor old fool," the Navy officer thought and he invited the ragged old Marine into the pub for a drink. As he felt he should start some conversation while they were sipping their whisky, the smart-ass fighter pilot asked, "And how many have you caught?" "You're the eighth," the old Marine Gunny answered.

Submitted by:
Sgt John Wear
Vietnam Tanker


Veteran Suicide Prevention Challenge​

Tony Hogrefe, great job in this vid!

View this at Veteran Suicide Prevention Challenge.


Vietnam Veteran

Memories of my time in service.

Semper Fi
Cpl D.E. Peterson
1972/1978


Lejeune (luh-jern)

The Lejeune (luh-jern) family would like respect & honor returned to the General's great name. Herein for your review is the gouge, substantiating that we have a generation who have been, sadly, off target... it is remedial action time as well as time to honor and respect one outstanding leatherneck... please pass the word... the Lejeune (luh-jern) family would love it.


This Is A Monumental Day

Sgt. Grit,

For me, this is a monumental day. Today, I'm celebrating my 50th Marine Corps Birthday. To many, I'm a boot and 50 birthdays falls short of what many of my Marine brothers have celebrated. Unless you have been there, it's impossible to explain life as Marine. I think the easiest way to explain it is to say that: Every formation is a family get-together, every meal is a banquet, and every night is a Saturday night.

I've been retired from the "Corps" longer than I was on active duty, but I continue to long for those foot-loose, fancy-free days when my only responsibility was to my fellow Marines, God, "Corps" and country (not necessarily in that order). Life seemed so much easier then. I had much less money in my pocket then than I do now, but OH - the good times. I've had the pleasure of traveling to 38 different countries as an Infantry Marine, on many different missions, usually training. Then there are the cities - from Subic Bay, Olongopo (sic) around the world to Venice and Rome, Italy, Athens, Greece, Hong Kong and many more in between, crossed the equator twice.

Needless to say, the incredible, disciplined, courageous, Marines I've had the professional pleasure to serve with are much too numerous to list here. Your newsletter just isn't big enough to list them all. Suffice it to write that I've served with Medal of Honor recipients, as well as some of lesser renown, but all were Marines (title earned not given) dedicated to the values we hold so dear.

Least I not forget that there were some bad times too. I saw Marines die in far away lands. My hurt continues to go out to the families who lost their Marine in combat because of Marines' dedication to God, "Corps" and country. I don't see that changing any time soon. I don't remember all their names, but I vividly remember the agony we all experienced because of the loss of a Marine brother. There is no drug of any type that can assuage the grief of those tough times.

No, I'm not crying in my beer. I'm thankful to have lived the life I have lived.

Now, to my reason for writing - I wish to all my fellow Marines a very, very Happy Birthday. I'm honored to hold the title Marine. I'm honored to be a small part of the Marine brotherhood. All will die someday, but we will die MARINES, now and forever.

Semper Fi,
A former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


A Game Of Hide-And-Seek

This photo was posted on the Sgt Grit Facebook page this past week. It displays a Marine holding a combat shotgun while looking around a corner. The text on the photo reads "When is a game of hide-and-seek not fair? When you choose to play the game with a U.S. Marine! Semper Fi!"

Here are some of the responses left by fans of our Facebook page:


Mark Hayes - use the mark19 to find their dumb azses.


Howard Andrews - Ali Ali in free!


Raul-Maria Garza - Lock and load!


David Miller Lesley - Oh hell ya... Blackhearts love playing this game.


Rock Hornbuckle - I still prefer the original WWI "trench gun" used by the Marines in France. The model 97 Winchester. We used the M870 in Vietnam.


Aaron Baltosser - Tag, you're it!


View more of the comment that were left about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Edenton, NC

In reference to the letter from Sgt R.Nowicki, I arrived at USMC air station Edenton, NC during October 1957. I had just completed ATA school Memphis, TN, Naval air station and was assigned to VMA 211. We were just recieving the A4 Skyhawks as were VMA 225 the other group stationed at Edenton. It was great duty at the time but then during 1958 the base was going to close and the 2 squadrons were sent to EL Toro. I was transferred to H&MS14 and went to Cherry Point after the base was closed in late '58. I got out in '59 when the Marines were doing a severe cut back. I passed thru Edenton about 5 years ago and it is now a beautiful small town very different from when I would go on liberty there. The air station is now a small county airport.

Semper Fi
Bob Sullivan (Sully)


Platoon 428, 1952​

I am the proud 59 year wife of a retired USMC Mustang Major. 3 years ago he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease and his short term memory is almost totally gone. However, we were fortunate enough to attend MCRD Graduation 2 weeks ago. He was a particpant there 62 years ago (Platoon 428, 1952, San Diego) and it brought back so many memories for him. His Drill Instructors were Sgt. R. M. Latham and Sgt. J. C. McCormack. He has a photo of the platoon but does not have the book. If there is anyone out there who has a copy they would sell, I would pay any price for it as it would be the very best gift for him under the tree. It would bring back so many memories for him as he is so proud to be a Marine, and I know those memories will stay with him long after others are gone!

My husband, Ron, served in Viet Nam at An Hoa in '69-'70 & would love to hear from his fellow Marines who served there with him in the 5th Marines. He does not read the newsletter much anymore, but I read it faithfully and call his attention to various items. Thanks again for all you do and God bless you and Yours​.

Bernice Delabarre
rbdfrbc@centurylink.net


MCM Skydive

Sgt Grit,

Check out the link below from the MCM skydive we did in D.C. two weeks ago. Cpl Carpenter (Medal of Honor) is a super representative of our Country and Corps...

We got to see D.C. from a perspective few others will ever see...

Sadly, the clip editor can't spell "Corps".

Semper Fidelis,
John

P.S. Always enjoy your newsletters...

​View the video at Team Fastrax opens the Marine Corp Marathon 2014


Duck And Deer Hunting In Korea

I went to Korea ending up at 1st Combat Service Group, we furnished weapons to the lines and once had to ready (60) .50 caliber machine guns and (50) .30 caliber machine guns to the lines. Weapons put in storage at that time were covered with Cosmoline (a tar like substance) and had to be soaked in solvent to get the cosmoline off (we didn't have any solvent so we used gasoline.) Many of the weapons were from WWII, (having been stored since then and had to be repaired as well), they were soaked in Gasoline. We wore rubber aprons but still were soaked with gasoline from head to toe.

We worked for over 24 hours to get the weapons to the lines for the latest battles with Communist Forces of North Korea. There were other times we worked day and night to supply weapons and what ever was needed, sometimes we had to help supply to get weapons or other supplies ready to ship by truck or plane. Thirty days before I was to return home, I was sent to a Fire Station in Masan where we drove Six-By trucks converted to Fire Trucks that held about a thousand gallons of water.

We were sent to the docks when wood stored by Koreans for Winter somehow had started burning. I took one truck and pushed piles of the burning wood into the water. Koreans went out in boats trying to save as much wood as they could. We even fought fires at Korean Houses where Kim Chee was buried to ferment. There was an old saying in the Marine Corps that went; "Screwed up like a Chinese Fire Drill." I found the background for that saying. There were no fire hydrants in the streets of cities, but there were manhole covers over water. Going to a fire the Korean Fire Truck would come to one of these man hole covers, a Korean Fireman would jump off the back of the fire truck with a mat to cushion his fall, he carried a hose from the truck and would open a man hole, dropping the hose into the water so it could be sucked out to fight the fire. Our fire fighting methods were so advanced to the Koreans at that time.

There were Korean displaced people that lived as best they could in cardboard box homes. They did whatever and wherever they could to survive the terribly cold winters. Special Services told us we could go hunting. We could hunt the Korean Deer (which were about the size of German sheppard dogs) or we could go duck hunting. We tried the deer hunting and got two deer which were cleaned for us by some Korean farmers (of course we gave them lots of the meat). One of our cooks cooked the meat for our unit.

Then we went duck hunting. The ducks had never been hunted and were in large flocks, you would shoot, flocks of ducks would fly off and you could see where they went. We would drive to that area, fire a shotgun, when they flew up again, we would fire into the flock, then load the dead ducks into the back of a Six-By. We gave away many of the ducks to Koreans on the streets going back to camp. On these hunting expeditions we had to have at least three men armed with M1 Garands in case we were attacked by North Korean Gorilla's which were everywhere, but didn't attack a Marine Hunting Party.

My thirteen months in Korea came to an end. We were loaded on a ship and came home.

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired​


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

Vol #11, #3

We talked and talked and talked until my Mom asked "What can I fix you for lunch?" (My Mom was always wanting to fix me something to eat. She must have thought that I was always hungry. And maybe I was.) I said "Why don't you let me take you two out for lunch?" (I knew this wouldn't work... she never wanted me to spend any money on them.) She went out into the kitchen to fix lunch. I said "I had told the B's I would see them later in the day, but I do not want to interfere with any of their meals. Lets leave here shortly after 2:00. How does that sound?" They said "That's okay." We left at about 2:15.

Dad said "Take my car. It hasn't moved since last Friday and it's a 4-door." I told him "I wish to H-ll mine was. I hate 2-door cars. I just didn't have much of a choice when I bought mine." I told Dad "Take Rt. 38 to Pine St, go left to Branch Ave., then go left again. The B's live just a few doors down on the right." We were there by 2:30. Only Mrs.'B' was home. She called Mr. 'B' and he said he would be there within the hour. As soon as we got to the B's house everyone recognized each other and were certain they had met at my high school graduation. That had to be right as I was unable to attend Mary's graduation in 1948 because I was still in school at Camp Lejeune. Mr.'B' was home before 3:30. He recognized my Mom and Dad instantly. The conversation quickly turned to their kids and the fact that we had been thinking of getting married. (I don't think I had told my parents of this revelation.) And it wasn't too long before Mrs.'B' blurted out "It is really beautiful how they sleep together with their arms all wrapped around each other." I could have crawled under a rock when she said that. My Mom looked at me. I knew that 'sleeping together' meant something else to her. She said nothing but I know she did not like what she had just heard. Mrs.'B' knew that we had chosen to live a Platonic lifestyle and I doubt that my Mom had ever heard the word 'Platonic'. Mrs.'B' soon realized that she had said something she should not have. She explained that she meant when we 'napped' together on the living room sofa. That cleared the air as best as it could under the circumstances.

The B's knew, of course, that we had slept together in Mary's bed upstairs, her Aunt Jen's bed in N.Y.C., in their own bed in Ocean City and at motels and hotels when I took Mary to college, but they had not seen us at those times. It was best that these not be brought up at this time or my mother would have gone into orbit. The B's asked us to stay and have dinner with them. My mother said "We appreciate the invitation but we have plans for dinner." I was not aware of any plans but kept quiet. When we were back in the car I asked Mom "What plans did we make?" She replied "We are eating at home. I wanted to get out of there as politely as possible." I did not wish to join them myself and I guess we managed to get out of there as easily as possible. We were back home by about 1700 and Mom went straight to the kitchen to prepare dinner. She did not say a word about Mary and I 'sleeping together'.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Lost And Found

If anyone was in Plt. 352 at Parris Island from July to Oct. in 1962, I would like to hear from you. This also includes our Drill Instructors. E-mail me atagirvin@rochester.rr.com.

Thanks Cpl. Art Girvin
USMC Semper Fi​


Short Rounds

The submission in this week's newsletter from Karen Balske brought back a lot of memories. I had the privilege of serving under Capt. Balske when he was CO of Alpha Battery, 2nd LAAM Bn. atthe Stumps. I was his admin. chief from October of 1968 until December of 1969. I recall a proud and dedicated Marine.

Jim Reese
Sgt. '67 to '71


In response to the story about DI SSgt Blankenship, I recall serving in Viet Nam '66-'67 with a Sgt Blankenship. I was assigned to 1st Marine Regt, S-2 and I believe he was with S-3. I don't know if they are the same person. It might be a "small world".

J Kanavy, Cpl


I really enjoyed the video, "Welcome Home" in your newsletter of November 12th. I'm glad our Military men and women of all the services are welcomed home in this beautiful manner. I hope it never changes. Sure beats the heck out of the way we were received coming back from 'Nam. Semper Fi to all my brothers and sisters.

GySgt J.J. Hinojosa, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
Pain is just fear leaving the body.


"If the Marine Corps wanted you to have a wife, they would have issued you one."

Thank goodness they don't. Like everything else issued in boot camp, you'd have to have it altered eventually.

John H. Hardin


I would like to wish the Marines past and present a Happy Birthday. It was an Honor to serve with the best.

Semper Fi,
Joe "Doc" Garcia
India Co 3/9 Viet Nam '65-'66


​Go have a slice (or two) of birthday cake and (if you are a good litle Marine) maybe a small drink to wash it down. Celebrate as you have earned it!

Gary L. COON
MSgt USMC (Ret)
0902, 10 Nov 14


Quotes

"Marines know how to use their bayonets. Army bayonets may as well be paper-weights."
--Navy Times; November 1994


"The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits."
--Albert Einstein


"Why in hell can't the Army do it if the Marines can. They are the same kind of men; why can't they be like Marines."
--Gen. John J. "Black Jack" Pershing, USA; 12 February 1918


"The United States Marine Corps, with its fiercely proud tradition of excellence in combat, its hallowed rituals, and its unbending code of honor, is part of the fabric of American myth."
--Thomas E. Ricks; Making the Corps, 1997


"You best get your f-cking eyeballs off me... do you have cranial rectal inversion."

"There will only be 7 planets left after I destroy uranus!"

"You eye-f-cking me boy?"

God Bless the American Dream!
Semper Fi!
Sgt Grit

 
©2014 Sgt Grit Inc
All rights reserved
7100 SW 44th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73179
888-NOV-1775
You are reading Sgt Grit's weekly newsletter.

To Submit a story - Email info@grunt.com.
Subscribe to this newsletter.

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 13 NOV 14

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 13 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• Hill 34
• Percy Pride
• Seabees

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Marine Dad, Marine Son, and Future Marine

Sgt Grit

We bought these baby dress blues from you before this little guy was even born. I am so proud of my Marines and hope that the little one follows in Pop's and Dad's footsteps!

Patricia H. Hayes

Make sure that your Devil Pup is ready for inspection with a set of their own!

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set


Korea Then And Now

Seoul Korea in 1953

Seoul Korea today

Hi Sgt Grit,

Here are a couple pictures of me going through Seoul, Korea. One from 1953 and one from what it looks like today. I was in 4.2 Mortar Co. and in SDMD, Platoon 16...

Sgt Bob Holmes
1359XXX


Hill 34

Haney and Goody Vietnam Vets Reunited

It has been 44 years sinse we last saw each other, but we finally made connection. We were in Viet Nam together in 1969-1970 hill 34 An Hoa. We were with 1st 175mm Gun Btry, Self propelled. It's been a long time, but here we are. We live just 225 miles apart so now we can see each other more often.

This is me (Robert Haney) Left, known as doc but I wasn't a corpsman and (Robert Goodman) Goody on the right. If you were with us you can contact me at: rjhaney175@sbcglobal.net. We need to get together.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to all MARINES!

Robert Haney


Happy Birthday Marine Corps

Marine Corps Birthday 1959

On behalf of my father, MSgt William Hauser (Ret), Korean War - 1st Marine Division, Happy Birthday Marine Corps - SEMPER FI!

Also please send wishes and prayers for he is not doing so well these days.

Thanks so much.

(My father is front row, left side)

Andrea Hauser


November 10, 1960

Camp Gieger, Company B, ITR

It was a cold, rainy night in the woods of North Carolina on my first birthday. It was so dark you couldn't see the person next to you. The only protection against the elements was our utilities and 782 gear. We marched off into the gloom and were told to dig foxholes on a sandy hill facing a barely visible tree line to wait for an attack from a RECON platoon that was in training at the same location. Each of us was armed with our M1s from boot camp, with a clip of blanks. So we started digging in the sand. When I figured my hole was deep enough, I discovered my piece was missing. I buried it. The "attack" never came. After we were all sufficiently miserable, the instructors ordered us to rise up and attack the tree line we were facing and fire as we moved. It didn't take me long to dig out my M1 that was now jammed with sand, but when I tried to jack a round in the chamber it made a most disconcerting sound, sort of like crushing a plastic bottle. I wasn't the only one, most of the company had the same problem. Our charge of the tree line only produced spotty gunshots here and there, more like an arcade game in a carnival than an assault by a Marine rifle company.

After our unsuccessful assault through the woods, the instructor(s) had us fall in in platoon formation, force a round into our weapons, hold them straight up over our heads and pull the trigger. I think most of us expected the rifles to explode because of the sand in the mechanisms and barrels. They didn't explode, but several didn't fire. This precipitated a lengthy discourse on the care and cleaning of the M1 while standing in the cold rain in the dark woods of North Carolina. Afterwards, we marched back, in two lines along a dirt road in route step, several miles back to the barracks. The Lieutenant set the pace between the ranks. As we were trudging along he shouted out that this day was the Marine Corps Birthday and that we were to answer his cadence loudly. It went like this:

"Sir! One Hundred and Eighty Five Years of Death H-ll and Destruction! United States Marine Corps! Gung Ho! Gung Ho! Gung Ho!"

Never forget it and always keep my rifle ready.

Norm Spilleth
Cpl, 1960-1964


Marine Training

My husband was and is a Marine. He joined up when he was a junior in High School during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Dropped out of High School and he went to Camp Pendleton in California. After basic boot camp and training, he was sent to Vietnam, lived in a fox hole for 13 months, back in '64-'65. When he came back to California, we met in church. (Some of the Marines came, I think to meet girls) but we hit it off and were married a few months later. When he was released from service, he worked full time and attended college. We both went to a community college and then to California State at Fullerton where we got our degrees, his a BS and mine a BA. We worked our way through college with help of VA education and loans. Bob was accepted at UCLA in Medical School where he worked as a teaching assistant and received high marks.

Bob received his Phd in Bio-Chemistry in 1976. During that time we ate a lot of hot dogs, chicken pot pies (when you could buy them 5 for $1.00.) When I told him we qualified for food stamps, he looked at me with his typical jaw out and said, "you have a roof over your head? you have enough to eat?" When I said yes, his reply was, "we don't need food stamps!" Marine training! After that he accepted a position for 3 years in a post-doc research position.

Finally in 1979 he had a "real job". He was 36. It took a lot of work and I am so proud of him. He is a scientist and has many patents to his name. We have been married for 48 years. I know the Marine Corps had a huge part in shaping his life and making him the man he is today. He is a great husband, father and grand-father and still thinks he is 25, while he buys soccer shoes and runs with 2 of his grand-kids all over the soccer field.

God bless America and the Marine Corps for the opportunity we have had and continue to share in this the United States of America.

Respectfully,
Kathleen A Stout
Wife of a Marine


Eagle, Globe, and Anchor Reflective Decal with 3D Doming


Get A Drag

Hey Grit,

February 1969... SSgt Blankenship, Platoon 3011, MCRD San Diego... "The smoking lamp is lit for one cigarette (all smokers fumbling for their smokes)... I said one cigarette... start it with the guide, pass it on and every one had better get a drag... there better be no non-smokers." Needless to say, the fire on that Winston was real long by the time the last recruit put his lips to it, and we made sure the Guide had 100mm cigs for the future in case this ever happened again.

Cpl A.C. Deck NCOAD (not currently on active duty)
3rd 8 inch Howitzer Battery (SP)
11th Marines, 1st Marine Division (RVN)


Percy Price

Dec. 1962, while staying an additional month for Guard duty in Gitmo. We would go to the EM club for brews. We also used our own troops for MP duty at the club. One night I had a little too much to drink, and felt quite brave. The call came to close up the club, but I had a couple of beers left and I wasn't going to leave them. The voice came from behind me to leave, and of course I wasn't about to leave the beer there. I told the voice behind me I would leave when I was finished! A hand appeared on my shoulder and I (having enough liquid courage) stood up and looked into the eyes of Percy Price, Marine Corps Heavy Weight champion, and having been the only one at that time to beat then Cassius Clay, (now Muhammad Ali). I of course left my beer. I believe the Great Percy Price has gone to his eternal reward. R.I.P. Percy.

Jim Logan


Belleau Wood

Marine drinking from the well at Belleau Wood

Center piece monument at Belleau Wood

Here are some more photos of Belleau Wood that were taken in June of 2014.

Thank you all for your service. For those hardball players in the southeast asia league welcome home. Happy Birthday!

KDT


Japan

Just a note to PFC Keith about HQ-4-12. I was there in 1960-61. Big Red Ebert was 1st Sgt. I was a 2533 radio man, then when I made E-4, was a radio chief. My call sign was Zookeeper 28. We lived in Quonset huts at camp Hague, except when we went to Camp Fuji, Japan for live-fire exercises. Then we lived in tents. We did that twice. Those were the good old days. Liberty in New Koza, Okinawa and Tomoho, Japan, right outside North camp Fuji.

Cpl. Paul Lindner
1959-1963


Welcome Home

"Welcome Home" is a new series being produced by Sleeping Dog Productions, Inc. It tells the story of Vietnam Veterans, from all branches of the service.

This is a trailer from a documentary that is supposed to air next year... 40 years after the fall of Saigon. It is scheduled for release in 2015, the 40th anniversary year of the end of the War.

Watch the Welcome Home movie trailer.


Seabees

Sizable detachments of Seabees, who stormed ashore with Marine assault troops in the first, second, and third waves to land on Bougainville in the Solomon Islands, distinguished themselves by the skill and valor with which they filled their combat assignments.

As the invasion forces approached the enemy beaches, the Seabees manned machine guns on Higgins boats, tank lighters and landing craft. Dare-devil builders leaped ashore from the first boats to nudge into the sand, and unloaded fuel, ammunition, rations and packs while heavy fighting broke out all about them on the beaches. Then, as the Japanese were driven back into the jungle, the Seabees manned beach defenses side-by-side with the Marines.

In addition to these activities, which were beyond the normal call of duty, the volunteer group of 100 Seabee officers and men who landed with the first wave also were credited with additional acts of bravery performed with complete disregard for their personal safety.

Landing craft from one transport had to pass through a narrow channel between two small islands just off Bougainville. Japanese machine gun nests on the inside of both islands had been firing upon every boat that attempted to move through the channel until Seabees manning landing craft guns effectively liquidated them. The Seabee sharp-shooters also helped drive away Japanese Zeroes that attacked the mother ship.

On landing, the rugged construction men rushed supplies from landing craft to combat line. Seabees carried ammunition and water to the front, and as was learned later, kept a group of Marines from being wiped out because of lack of supplies.

One Seabee jumped aboard a crippled tractor after its Marine driver had been shot off, hauled large quantities of ammunition, and helped place 20-mm anti-aircraft guns. Another group of the aroused builders riddled enemy pillboxes while Marines moved in to remove the Japanese with hand grenades. Still other Seabees moved a Marine heavy artillery battery to the front.

Without thought for their own safety, the Navy Construction men carried wounded from the front lines to the landing craft which would return the casualties to the transports for immediate evacuation. The Seabees scooped out foxholes, not only for themselves and the Marines, but for the injured who were unable to dig their own.

When one of the landing craft was hit by heavy artillery fire, a Seabee officer helped unload the wounded and badly needed supplies while other Seabees held the Japanese at bay.

The medical department set up a first aid station and treated men on the front lines (which were still the beach) with morphine and bandages carried in their packs. The first night of the landing, the Seabee detachment was assigned the defense of a portion of the beach. The volunteer group continued to hold this area for the next twenty-four days.

For days after the landing, the battling builders teamed up with Marine patrols to locate and neutralize Japanese snipers infiltrating through the lines.

From the small galley they had set up on the beach, Seabee cooks served hot meals to men on the front lines a few hundred yards away.

The only difference between an M-4 tank and the caterpillar Seabee W.I. Robertson,"MMLC, drove thru a hail of machine gun fire the day the Marines landed on Bougainville is that the tank would have had guns," wrote Marine Combat Correspondent Sergeant William Burnett from the battlefront.

"Within an hour after the first Marine stepped ashore, our 'cats' were on the beach and up to their radiators in work," Burnett quoted the Seabees. 'We were' supposed to keep the beach cleared, sorting supplies and keeping rolling stock from sticking in the sand. But ammunition was running low with the men moving inland, so we also got the job of dragging sleds loaded with shells to them thru the heavy jungle and swamp. We made our own roads as we went."

The bulldozer operators were Landing under fire at Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, Seabees first joined with Marines in defending the beaches against counter-attack, then got busy on construction of military roads feeding front lines. The fighting builders ran one of their roads 700 yards in advance of the Marines' front lines before the Leathernecks yelled for them to hold up a while, forced to the ground by heavy fire many times, according to Robertson. The Seabee said his cat still shows bullet marks on its blade and track. He recalled that when night came and a beachhead was secured, his mates used their bulldozers to knock over the Jap pill boxes and cover up the dead.

Submitted By
John Ratomski


I Am A Marine

I found this on FaceBook. I think your readers (me being on of them) will appreciate it. Lots of us peacekeepers still on watch.

I Am A MARINE

I am a Marine.
I served in no war, although I was prepared for it.
I did not see combat, although I was trained for it.
I did not receive orders to fight, but I was ready to follow them.
I did not see any of my friends die, but I feel the pain when any of my brothers are hurt.
I no longer wear the uniform on my body, but it is still a part of me.
A life, of Service, of Honor, of Integrity.
True to the Corps.
By my actions throughout life, people I encounter will know, "He is a Marine."
When I leave this Earth, my friends will say, "He was a Marine."
For a quiet eternity, the stone will read, "Marine."
Semper Fidelis
I am a Marine.

Tony Pisarek
United States Marine

--John H. Hardin


MACS 5

Sgt.Grit,

I wonder if anyone is still around re 1954 stationed at this landing field. It was about 125 miles north of Cherry Point. I wonder if anyone is still around from MACS 5 motor pool? The base was small but very active. The landing strip was so shaped as a carrier deck with trip wires in one section of it. If I remember the planes were AD 4 Sky raiders Single prop jobs who practiced landings. Marine Air Control Squadron 5 was a radar outfit that brought the planes home and ground control took over to land them. In the motor pool were the diesel generator sets for electric power. The generator sets had to run at exactly 60 cycles not more not less or good by radar sets. I know the base closed before 1957. I know 60 years is a long time ago, but it would be nice to hear from somebody who was at Edenton, NC.

Just read in the most recent letters of a Marine who still has his MCRD platoon red book about the same time period as me. I pulled out the book and went through it. It sure did bring back memories to me. I remember the first night as I was in the rack saying to myself, well stupid what did you get yourself into this time for four years. But no regrets it made a man out of me.

Semper Fi
Sgt Robert (Ski) Nowicki


He Would Never Talk

Dear Mark,

My father, Billy Ray Shelton, was also in the 2nd Marine Division on Tarawa. He too, died young of cancer (48), caused by a lifetime of smoking. He was about 16 when he joined the Marines, (he lied about his age,) and was proud of his Marine service, but other than some general positive stories, he would never talk of the horror he must have experienced. It is only now when I am middle-aged that I am fully realizing the extent of their sacrifice and experiences during that time. My Dad was a country boy from Natchitoches, Louisiana. I suppose lots of divisions had boys from the same part of the country. I found your article fascinating but sad, but it filled in a lot of blanks. Thanks for that. I only wish he was alive when I had sense to ask him some questions. At least you had a chance to thankfully.

Kathy Tweedale
Somerset, England


It Wasn't Pretty

I met one of the people that played on the 2nd Marine Division football squad. He was a classmate of mine in high school. This was the summer of '64 so it wasn't football season. I had just gotten back from my "recruit leave" and was going into Amtrac School at Courthouse Bay.

I really don't remember what a Private would say to a Corporal by way of polite conversation but we had one. It was so nice to meet a Marine that I could actually talk to just like if he was a regular guy.

We talked for 10 minutes or so and the conversation got around to his football career in the Corps. I was quite surprised that Marines were allowed to bash heads with people that weren't Marines. It seems that the 2nd Division played some of the local college level teams and other military unit's teams. The Corporal was a down lineman. He said that it was a fairly "rough" game at that level. So I asked, "how rough"... and he showed his leg. I must say, it wasn't pretty.

It seems that at that level of competition there was a certain amount of "allowable" cannibalism. Remember, this was right around the end of June. Football season was at least 5 months before. But there on his leg was the unmistakeable imprint of a good many teeth bites. I mean entire dentures were represented on his calf. I might have said something to effect... "Did it or does it, hurt... or... Mother of God what the H-ll happened to you?"

Well, it was nice to see a familiar face. I was real happy I could recognize it. But, I made up my mind that Marine Corps Football would be the last thing on my Bucket List.

If memory serves, we didn't have those back then but it was on it and it was in last place!

Later...
McDonald,P.B. (E/5)
4th Amtrac Bn, "A" Co 2nd Plt
1964 to 1970


One Man Bunker

Sgt. Grit,

LCpl Terry Lee Campbell's photo at the bottom of your latest advertisement (2 Dec14) showing the 1968 Birthday cake on Hill 65, reminded me of my brief stay on that hill from around 5 June until 1 August, 1967... when I was transferred to the HQ Battery of 3rd 8-Inch Howitzers out west of DaNang. After spending about six months with the "grunts" of Lima 3/7 as their art'y FO, I was called back to the battery to take over the Fire Direction Center.

My "sleeping quarters" which was a small one-man bunker just outside the entrance of the FDC, had a scenic view of the various rolls of concertina wire strung out along the eastern side of the hill. Most of my time while there was spent inside the FDC bunker.

Semper Fi!
Tom Downey
Once a Captain, USMCR; Always a Marine.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #2)

On Monday morning I walked into my office 10 minutes early as usual. Mr. Dyer (CWO4) and the two civilians were already at their desks... as usual. Louise Harbin, the wife of the Gunny that was the Golf Pro at Paradise Point - where you stayed in 1949 - gave me a beautiful smile. I then announced "Well, the Hudson is no more!" Louise asked "What happened?" I told everyone the same story I just told you. I got out the Onslow County yellow pages and looked for 'Automobile Dealers - New Cars'. There were very few listed and none were Hudson dealers. In 1950 there were only three dealerships in J'ville, a Ford, Chevrolet and Buick. I called the dealer I had purchased the Hudson from in Mt. Holly, N.J. and spoke with George Hodgson himself. I told him what happened and asked if he had another Hudson. He said "Hudsons are a hot commodity. Have you been following the stock car races?" I said that I had not, but that I knew quite well there was nothing else on the road that could catch a Hudson. He said "I only have one at the moment and it's a club coupe. I doubt that you are interested in it." He asked "How many miles did you have on your car?" I said "Just over 121,000." He asked "And how long did you have it?" I replied "Just over 18 months." He said "You must have done a lot of driving." I told him "Just over 1500 miles a week." He gave me the names and phone numbers of four Hudson dealers in N.C. The one in Wilmington only had a club coupe. The dealers in Charlotte and Raleigh were sold out. And the one in Asheville was too far away. I didn't even call that one. Louise and her husband agreed that I could use their car to go into J'ville. He picked her and I up after work and went home. Joe handed me the keys and said "Be careful." I went into J'ville and to the Buick dealer. They had only one car in stock, a 1950 Buick Super Riviera in two-tone green. It sat in the middle of the showroom floor. It was a sharp looking car. It was a new model for 1950. They didn't have to sell me on Buicks. I kept thinking about my choices at the moment. I had few. I decided to get this Buick. They said I could pick it up Tuesday evening... if my credit was approved. I told them that my Hudson was financed thru Union Trust in Mt. Holly, N.J. GMAC would finance the car and they would handle the insurance, too. I knew everything was good and the dealer called me at work a little before noon on Tuesday to tell me "Union Trust said your Hudson was financed in your father's name; not as a cosigner on your note. He said there was a notation on the note that it was for you and that you would be making the payments. He said that you had paid two payments when the first installment was due and then made monthly payments to date; that the account was always paid 30 days or more in advance; thereby establishing an excellent credit rating. Your credit is 'impeccable'.

I told them I would come in to pick up the car at about 7:00 PM. My tags were on the Hudson up in Weldon, so I got a 10 day paper tag. Joe and Louise went with me to get the car. They really liked it. That Dyna-flow transmission was r-e-a-l-l-y smooooooth, an absolute gem.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

I ws not a smoker in boot camp. I felt sorry for he guys that were. It was a week or more if not more before they got their fist smoke! As for me, I was dying for a coke.

B. Otis
Platoon 266
PI '57/'60


Born on 10 November 1961, I am a Corpsman who had the privilege to have served my country, but had the HONOR to have served with the United States Marine Corps.

I retired after 15 and a half years, served 11 and a half with 1st MARDIV (Echo Co. 2Bn/7th Marines, 1stBn/4th Marines, and 1st Mar Regiment) Operation Desert Shield/Storm.

Happy Birthday Brothers & Sisters! Semper Fidelis!

Doc Noll
HM1 (FMF), Retired


A grunts job... locate the enemy, close with him, and destroy him by any means possible.

Semper Fidelis,
Ray Kelley


I was at MCRD San Diego from 28 June 1962 to 18 Sept. 1962. We used clothespins (I think the squared off models with the spring in the middle but don't hold me to that). I suppose, along with the steak & lobster dinners once a week, surf boards, suntan lotion and sun glasses that's just one more thing to make the Pleasure Island graduates feel superior to San Diego.

Jerry D.


Hey Sarge... sure enjoy your newsletters. I went thru USMC boot camp September, 1953. We had a Cpl (Cpl Wise) and two PFCs as our DIs.

My Dad went thru USMC boot camp in 1917... so, I couldn't hold a candle to his stories.

Semper Fi!
Lawrence D. Morrell PhD
Albuquerque


With all the comments about tie ties I'm surprised no one has mentioned that our skivvies drawers did not have elastic waistbands. There were sewn on tie ties on each side which you used to adjust the size and also hang them on the clothes line.

Also, a common expression when the DI didn't want to allow a head call "Use a tie tie on it".

M Oakes
USMC 1956 to 1980


Enjoyed reading the story from Sgt D.B. Whiting about his life at MCRD Plt 295, 1953-1956. I also was at MCRD at the same time in Plt 284, Sgt Wind was my D.I. I too still have my red book from that time. Brings back many stories of my first time away from home, (PRICELESS).

Sgt. G.D. LAISURE


Love these newsletters! My late husband was a proud 30 year Marine! I also enjoyed seeing the picture of Commandant Hagee - knew him from 29 Palms. Happy birthday, Marines! Semper Fi.

Karen Balske


I don't know any alternate words to the Hymn, but do recall in the early 1960's guys singing the Hymn to the tune of two popular songs. One was "Ghost Riders In The Sky" and the other was "Running Bear".

George


Quotes

"[T]he whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary."
--H.L. Mencken, [1918]


"When Gen. Abrial arrived to relieve me as the supreme commander, only don't ask, don't tell kept me from hugging and kissing him."
--Gen. James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"You are part of the world's most feared and trusted force. Engage your brain before you engage your weapon."
--Gen. James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"The safest place in Korea was right behind a platoon of Marines. Lord, how they could fight!"
--MGen. Frank E. Lowe, USA; Korea, 26 January 1952


"You came into my Marine Corps to become a road guard! Outstanding, now that's a man with a plan."

"What the holy h-ll is that recruit? You in some kinda glo-belt beauty pageant? Drop and give me 50 maggot!"

"Who's the slimy little Communist sh-t, twinkle-toed, c-cksucker down here who just signed his own death warrant?!"

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter 13 NOV 14
If you are having trouble viewing this issue, see it on our website:
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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 13 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• Hill 34
• Percy Pride
• Seabees

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Sgt Grit

We bought these baby dress blues from you before this little guy was even born. I am so proud of my Marines and hope that the little one follows in Pop's and Dad's footsteps!

Patricia H. Hayes

Make sure that your Devil Pup is ready for inspection with a set of their own!

Dress Blues Baby 2 Piece Set


Korea Then And Now

Hi Sgt Grit,

Here are a couple pictures of me going through Seoul, Korea. One from 1953 and one from what it looks like today. I was in 4.2 Mortar Co. and in SDMD, Platoon 16...

Sgt Bob Holmes
1359XXX


Hill 34

It has been 44 years sinse we last saw each other, but we finally made connection. We were in Viet Nam together in 1969-1970 hill 34 An Hoa. We were with 1st 175mm Gun Btry, Self propelled. It's been a long time, but here we are. We live just 225 miles apart so now we can see each other more often.

This is me (Robert Haney) Left, known as doc but I wasn't a corpsman and (Robert Goodman) Goody on the right. If you were with us you can contact me at: rjhaney175@sbcglobal.net. We need to get together.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to all MARINES!

Robert Haney


Happy Birthday Marine Corps

On behalf of my father, MSgt William Hauser (Ret), Korean War - 1st Marine Division, Happy Birthday Marine Corps - SEMPER FI!

Also please send wishes and prayers for he is not doing so well these days.

Thanks so much.

(My father is front row, left side)

Andrea Hauser


November 10, 1960

Camp Gieger, Company B, ITR

It was a cold, rainy night in the woods of North Carolina on my first birthday. It was so dark you couldn't see the person next to you. The only protection against the elements was our utilities and 782 gear. We marched off into the gloom and were told to dig foxholes on a sandy hill facing a barely visible tree line to wait for an attack from a RECON platoon that was in training at the same location. Each of us was armed with our M1s from boot camp, with a clip of blanks. So we started digging in the sand. When I figured my hole was deep enough, I discovered my piece was missing. I buried it. The "attack" never came. After we were all sufficiently miserable, the instructors ordered us to rise up and attack the tree line we were facing and fire as we moved. It didn't take me long to dig out my M1 that was now jammed with sand, but when I tried to jack a round in the chamber it made a most disconcerting sound, sort of like crushing a plastic bottle. I wasn't the only one, most of the company had the same problem. Our charge of the tree line only produced spotty gunshots here and there, more like an arcade game in a carnival than an assault by a Marine rifle company.

After our unsuccessful assault through the woods, the instructor(s) had us fall in in platoon formation, force a round into our weapons, hold them straight up over our heads and pull the trigger. I think most of us expected the rifles to explode because of the sand in the mechanisms and barrels. They didn't explode, but several didn't fire. This precipitated a lengthy discourse on the care and cleaning of the M1 while standing in the cold rain in the dark woods of North Carolina. Afterwards, we marched back, in two lines along a dirt road in route step, several miles back to the barracks. The Lieutenant set the pace between the ranks. As we were trudging along he shouted out that this day was the Marine Corps Birthday and that we were to answer his cadence loudly. It went like this:

"Sir! One Hundred and Eighty Five Years of Death H-ll and Destruction! United States Marine Corps! Gung Ho! Gung Ho! Gung Ho!"

Never forget it and always keep my rifle ready.

Norm Spilleth
Cpl, 1960-1964


Marine Training

My husband was and is a Marine. He joined up when he was a junior in High School during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Dropped out of High School and he went to Camp Pendleton in California. After basic boot camp and training, he was sent to Vietnam, lived in a fox hole for 13 months, back in '64-'65. When he came back to California, we met in church. (Some of the Marines came, I think to meet girls) but we hit it off and were married a few months later. When he was released from service, he worked full time and attended college. We both went to a community college and then to California State at Fullerton where we got our degrees, his a BS and mine a BA. We worked our way through college with help of VA education and loans. Bob was accepted at UCLA in Medical School where he worked as a teaching assistant and received high marks.

Bob received his Phd in Bio-Chemistry in 1976. During that time we ate a lot of hot dogs, chicken pot pies (when you could buy them 5 for $1.00.) When I told him we qualified for food stamps, he looked at me with his typical jaw out and said, "you have a roof over your head? you have enough to eat?" When I said yes, his reply was, "we don't need food stamps!" Marine training! After that he accepted a position for 3 years in a post-doc research position.

Finally in 1979 he had a "real job". He was 36. It took a lot of work and I am so proud of him. He is a scientist and has many patents to his name. We have been married for 48 years. I know the Marine Corps had a huge part in shaping his life and making him the man he is today. He is a great husband, father and grand-father and still thinks he is 25, while he buys soccer shoes and runs with 2 of his grand-kids all over the soccer field.

God bless America and the Marine Corps for the opportunity we have had and continue to share in this the United States of America.

Respectfully,
Kathleen A Stout
Wife of a Marine


Get A Drag

Hey Grit,

February 1969... SSgt Blankenship, Platoon 3011, MCRD San Diego... "The smoking lamp is lit for one cigarette (all smokers fumbling for their smokes)... I said one cigarette... start it with the guide, pass it on and every one had better get a drag... there better be no non-smokers." Needless to say, the fire on that Winston was real long by the time the last recruit put his lips to it, and we made sure the Guide had 100mm cigs for the future in case this ever happened again.

Cpl A.C. Deck NCOAD (not currently on active duty)
3rd 8 inch Howitzer Battery (SP)
11th Marines, 1st Marine Division (RVN)


Percy Price

Dec. 1962, while staying an additional month for Guard duty in Gitmo. We would go to the EM club for brews. We also used our own troops for MP duty at the club. One night I had a little too much to drink, and felt quite brave. The call came to close up the club, but I had a couple of beers left and I wasn't going to leave them. The voice came from behind me to leave, and of course I wasn't about to leave the beer there. I told the voice behind me I would leave when I was finished! A hand appeared on my shoulder and I (having enough liquid courage) stood up and looked into the eyes of Percy Price, Marine Corps Heavy Weight champion, and having been the only one at that time to beat then Cassius Clay, (now Muhammad Ali). I of course left my beer. I believe the Great Percy Price has gone to his eternal reward. R.I.P. Percy.

Jim Logan


Belleau Wood

Here are some more photos of Belleau Wood that were taken in June of 2014.

Thank you all for your service. For those hardball players in the southeast asia league welcome home. Happy Birthday!

KDT


Japan

Just a note to PFC Keith about HQ-4-12. I was there in 1960-61. Big Red Ebert was 1st Sgt. I was a 2533 radio man, then when I made E-4, was a radio chief. My call sign was Zookeeper 28. We lived in Quonset huts at camp Hague, except when we went to Camp Fuji, Japan for live-fire exercises. Then we lived in tents. We did that twice. Those were the good old days. Liberty in New Koza, Okinawa and Tomoho, Japan, right outside North camp Fuji.

Cpl. Paul Lindner
1959-1963


Welcome Home

"Welcome Home" is a new series being produced by Sleeping Dog Productions, Inc. It tells the story of Vietnam Veterans, from all branches of the service.

This is a trailer from a documentary that is supposed to air next year... 40 years after the fall of Saigon. It is scheduled for release in 2015, the 40th anniversary year of the end of the War.

Watch the Welcome Home movie trailer.


Seabees

Sizable detachments of Seabees, who stormed ashore with Marine assault troops in the first, second, and third waves to land on Bougainville in the Solomon Islands, distinguished themselves by the skill and valor with which they filled their combat assignments.

As the invasion forces approached the enemy beaches, the Seabees manned machine guns on Higgins boats, tank lighters and landing craft. Dare-devil builders leaped ashore from the first boats to nudge into the sand, and unloaded fuel, ammunition, rations and packs while heavy fighting broke out all about them on the beaches. Then, as the Japanese were driven back into the jungle, the Seabees manned beach defenses side-by-side with the Marines.

In addition to these activities, which were beyond the normal call of duty, the volunteer group of 100 Seabee officers and men who landed with the first wave also were credited with additional acts of bravery performed with complete disregard for their personal safety.

Landing craft from one transport had to pass through a narrow channel between two small islands just off Bougainville. Japanese machine gun nests on the inside of both islands had been firing upon every boat that attempted to move through the channel until Seabees manning landing craft guns effectively liquidated them. The Seabee sharp-shooters also helped drive away Japanese Zeroes that attacked the mother ship.

On landing, the rugged construction men rushed supplies from landing craft to combat line. Seabees carried ammunition and water to the front, and as was learned later, kept a group of Marines from being wiped out because of lack of supplies.

One Seabee jumped aboard a crippled tractor after its Marine driver had been shot off, hauled large quantities of ammunition, and helped place 20-mm anti-aircraft guns. Another group of the aroused builders riddled enemy pillboxes while Marines moved in to remove the Japanese with hand grenades. Still other Seabees moved a Marine heavy artillery battery to the front.

Without thought for their own safety, the Navy Construction men carried wounded from the front lines to the landing craft which would return the casualties to the transports for immediate evacuation. The Seabees scooped out foxholes, not only for themselves and the Marines, but for the injured who were unable to dig their own.

When one of the landing craft was hit by heavy artillery fire, a Seabee officer helped unload the wounded and badly needed supplies while other Seabees held the Japanese at bay.

The medical department set up a first aid station and treated men on the front lines (which were still the beach) with morphine and bandages carried in their packs. The first night of the landing, the Seabee detachment was assigned the defense of a portion of the beach. The volunteer group continued to hold this area for the next twenty-four days.

For days after the landing, the battling builders teamed up with Marine patrols to locate and neutralize Japanese snipers infiltrating through the lines.

From the small galley they had set up on the beach, Seabee cooks served hot meals to men on the front lines a few hundred yards away.

The only difference between an M-4 tank and the caterpillar Seabee W.I. Robertson,"MMLC, drove thru a hail of machine gun fire the day the Marines landed on Bougainville is that the tank would have had guns," wrote Marine Combat Correspondent Sergeant William Burnett from the battlefront.

"Within an hour after the first Marine stepped ashore, our 'cats' were on the beach and up to their radiators in work," Burnett quoted the Seabees. 'We were' supposed to keep the beach cleared, sorting supplies and keeping rolling stock from sticking in the sand. But ammunition was running low with the men moving inland, so we also got the job of dragging sleds loaded with shells to them thru the heavy jungle and swamp. We made our own roads as we went."

The bulldozer operators were Landing under fire at Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, Seabees first joined with Marines in defending the beaches against counter-attack, then got busy on construction of military roads feeding front lines. The fighting builders ran one of their roads 700 yards in advance of the Marines' front lines before the Leathernecks yelled for them to hold up a while, forced to the ground by heavy fire many times, according to Robertson. The Seabee said his cat still shows bullet marks on its blade and track. He recalled that when night came and a beachhead was secured, his mates used their bulldozers to knock over the Jap pill boxes and cover up the dead.

Submitted By
John Ratomski


I Am A Marine

I found this on FaceBook. I think your readers (me being on of them) will appreciate it. Lots of us peacekeepers still on watch.

I Am A MARINE

I am a Marine.
I served in no war, although I was prepared for it.
I did not see combat, although I was trained for it.
I did not receive orders to fight, but I was ready to follow them.
I did not see any of my friends die, but I feel the pain when any of my brothers are hurt.
I no longer wear the uniform on my body, but it is still a part of me.
A life, of Service, of Honor, of Integrity.
True to the Corps.
By my actions throughout life, people I encounter will know, "He is a Marine."
When I leave this Earth, my friends will say, "He was a Marine."
For a quiet eternity, the stone will read, "Marine."
Semper Fidelis
I am a Marine.

Tony Pisarek
United States Marine

--John H. Hardin


MACS 5

Sgt.Grit,

I wonder if anyone is still around re 1954 stationed at this landing field. It was about 125 miles north of Cherry Point. I wonder if anyone is still around from MACS 5 motor pool? The base was small but very active. The landing strip was so shaped as a carrier deck with trip wires in one section of it. If I remember the planes were AD 4 Sky raiders Single prop jobs who practiced landings. Marine Air Control Squadron 5 was a radar outfit that brought the planes home and ground control took over to land them. In the motor pool were the diesel generator sets for electric power. The generator sets had to run at exactly 60 cycles not more not less or good by radar sets. I know the base closed before 1957. I know 60 years is a long time ago, but it would be nice to hear from somebody who was at Edenton, NC.

Just read in the most recent letters of a Marine who still has his MCRD platoon red book about the same time period as me. I pulled out the book and went through it. It sure did bring back memories to me. I remember the first night as I was in the rack saying to myself, well stupid what did you get yourself into this time for four years. But no regrets it made a man out of me.

Semper Fi
Sgt Robert (Ski) Nowicki


He Would Never Talk

Dear Mark,

My father, Billy Ray Shelton, was also in the 2nd Marine Division on Tarawa. He too, died young of cancer (48), caused by a lifetime of smoking. He was about 16 when he joined the Marines, (he lied about his age,) and was proud of his Marine service, but other than some general positive stories, he would never talk of the horror he must have experienced. It is only now when I am middle-aged that I am fully realizing the extent of their sacrifice and experiences during that time. My Dad was a country boy from Natchitoches, Louisiana. I suppose lots of divisions had boys from the same part of the country. I found your article fascinating but sad, but it filled in a lot of blanks. Thanks for that. I only wish he was alive when I had sense to ask him some questions. At least you had a chance to thankfully.

Kathy Tweedale
Somerset, England


It Wasn't Pretty

I met one of the people that played on the 2nd Marine Division football squad. He was a classmate of mine in high school. This was the summer of '64 so it wasn't football season. I had just gotten back from my "recruit leave" and was going into Amtrac School at Courthouse Bay.

I really don't remember what a Private would say to a Corporal by way of polite conversation but we had one. It was so nice to meet a Marine that I could actually talk to just like if he was a regular guy.

We talked for 10 minutes or so and the conversation got around to his football career in the Corps. I was quite surprised that Marines were allowed to bash heads with people that weren't Marines. It seems that the 2nd Division played some of the local college level teams and other military unit's teams. The Corporal was a down lineman. He said that it was a fairly "rough" game at that level. So I asked, "how rough"... and he showed his leg. I must say, it wasn't pretty.

It seems that at that level of competition there was a certain amount of "allowable" cannibalism. Remember, this was right around the end of June. Football season was at least 5 months before. But there on his leg was the unmistakeable imprint of a good many teeth bites. I mean entire dentures were represented on his calf. I might have said something to effect... "Did it or does it, hurt... or... Mother of God what the H-ll happened to you?"

Well, it was nice to see a familiar face. I was real happy I could recognize it. But, I made up my mind that Marine Corps Football would be the last thing on my Bucket List.

If memory serves, we didn't have those back then but it was on it and it was in last place!

Later...
McDonald,P.B. (E/5)
4th Amtrac Bn, "A" Co 2nd Plt
1964 to 1970


One Man Bunker

Sgt. Grit,

LCpl Terry Lee Campbell's photo at the bottom of your latest advertisement (2 Dec14) showing the 1968 Birthday cake on Hill 65, reminded me of my brief stay on that hill from around 5 June until 1 August, 1967... when I was transferred to the HQ Battery of 3rd 8-Inch Howitzers out west of DaNang. After spending about six months with the "grunts" of Lima 3/7 as their art'y FO, I was called back to the battery to take over the Fire Direction Center.

My "sleeping quarters" which was a small one-man bunker just outside the entrance of the FDC, had a scenic view of the various rolls of concertina wire strung out along the eastern side of the hill. Most of my time while there was spent inside the FDC bunker.

Semper Fi!
Tom Downey
Once a Captain, USMCR; Always a Marine.


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #2)

On Monday morning I walked into my office 10 minutes early as usual. Mr. Dyer (CWO4) and the two civilians were already at their desks... as usual. Louise Harbin, the wife of the Gunny that was the Golf Pro at Paradise Point - where you stayed in 1949 - gave me a beautiful smile. I then announced "Well, the Hudson is no more!" Louise asked "What happened?" I told everyone the same story I just told you. I got out the Onslow County yellow pages and looked for 'Automobile Dealers - New Cars'. There were very few listed and none were Hudson dealers. In 1950 there were only three dealerships in J'ville, a Ford, Chevrolet and Buick. I called the dealer I had purchased the Hudson from in Mt. Holly, N.J. and spoke with George Hodgson himself. I told him what happened and asked if he had another Hudson. He said "Hudsons are a hot commodity. Have you been following the stock car races?" I said that I had not, but that I knew quite well there was nothing else on the road that could catch a Hudson. He said "I only have one at the moment and it's a club coupe. I doubt that you are interested in it." He asked "How many miles did you have on your car?" I said "Just over 121,000." He asked "And how long did you have it?" I replied "Just over 18 months." He said "You must have done a lot of driving." I told him "Just over 1500 miles a week." He gave me the names and phone numbers of four Hudson dealers in N.C. The one in Wilmington only had a club coupe. The dealers in Charlotte and Raleigh were sold out. And the one in Asheville was too far away. I didn't even call that one. Louise and her husband agreed that I could use their car to go into J'ville. He picked her and I up after work and went home. Joe handed me the keys and said "Be careful." I went into J'ville and to the Buick dealer. They had only one car in stock, a 1950 Buick Super Riviera in two-tone green. It sat in the middle of the showroom floor. It was a sharp looking car. It was a new model for 1950. They didn't have to sell me on Buicks. I kept thinking about my choices at the moment. I had few. I decided to get this Buick. They said I could pick it up Tuesday evening... if my credit was approved. I told them that my Hudson was financed thru Union Trust in Mt. Holly, N.J. GMAC would finance the car and they would handle the insurance, too. I knew everything was good and the dealer called me at work a little before noon on Tuesday to tell me "Union Trust said your Hudson was financed in your father's name; not as a cosigner on your note. He said there was a notation on the note that it was for you and that you would be making the payments. He said that you had paid two payments when the first installment was due and then made monthly payments to date; that the account was always paid 30 days or more in advance; thereby establishing an excellent credit rating. Your credit is 'impeccable'.

I told them I would come in to pick up the car at about 7:00 PM. My tags were on the Hudson up in Weldon, so I got a 10 day paper tag. Joe and Louise went with me to get the car. They really liked it. That Dyna-flow transmission was r-e-a-l-l-y smooooooth, an absolute gem.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

I ws not a smoker in boot camp. I felt sorry for he guys that were. It was a week or more if not more before they got their fist smoke! As for me, I was dying for a coke.

B. Otis
Platoon 266
PI '57/'60


Born on 10 November 1961, I am a Corpsman who had the privilege to have served my country, but had the HONOR to have served with the United States Marine Corps.

I retired after 15 and a half years, served 11 and a half with 1st MARDIV (Echo Co. 2Bn/7th Marines, 1stBn/4th Marines, and 1st Mar Regiment) Operation Desert Shield/Storm.

Happy Birthday Brothers & Sisters! Semper Fidelis!

Doc Noll
HM1 (FMF), Retired


A grunts job... locate the enemy, close with him, and destroy him by any means possible.

Semper Fidelis,
Ray Kelley


I was at MCRD San Diego from 28 June 1962 to 18 Sept. 1962. We used clothespins (I think the squared off models with the spring in the middle but don't hold me to that). I suppose, along with the steak & lobster dinners once a week, surf boards, suntan lotion and sun glasses that's just one more thing to make the Pleasure Island graduates feel superior to San Diego.

Jerry D.


Hey Sarge... sure enjoy your newsletters. I went thru USMC boot camp September, 1953. We had a Cpl (Cpl Wise) and two PFCs as our DIs.

My Dad went thru USMC boot camp in 1917... so, I couldn't hold a candle to his stories.

Semper Fi!
Lawrence D. Morrell PhD
Albuquerque


With all the comments about tie ties I'm surprised no one has mentioned that our skivvies drawers did not have elastic waistbands. There were sewn on tie ties on each side which you used to adjust the size and also hang them on the clothes line.

Also, a common expression when the DI didn't want to allow a head call "Use a tie tie on it".

M Oakes
USMC 1956 to 1980


Enjoyed reading the story from Sgt D.B. Whiting about his life at MCRD Plt 295, 1953-1956. I also was at MCRD at the same time in Plt 284, Sgt Wind was my D.I. I too still have my red book from that time. Brings back many stories of my first time away from home, (PRICELESS).

Sgt. G.D. LAISURE


Love these newsletters! My late husband was a proud 30 year Marine! I also enjoyed seeing the picture of Commandant Hagee - knew him from 29 Palms. Happy birthday, Marines! Semper Fi.

Karen Balske


I don't know any alternate words to the Hymn, but do recall in the early 1960's guys singing the Hymn to the tune of two popular songs. One was "Ghost Riders In The Sky" and the other was "Running Bear".

George


Quotes

"[T]he whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary."
--H.L. Mencken, [1918]


"When Gen. Abrial arrived to relieve me as the supreme commander, only don't ask, don't tell kept me from hugging and kissing him."
--Gen. James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"You are part of the world's most feared and trusted force. Engage your brain before you engage your weapon."
--Gen. James "Mad Dog" Mattis


"The safest place in Korea was right behind a platoon of Marines. Lord, how they could fight!"
--MGen. Frank E. Lowe, USA; Korea, 26 January 1952


"You came into my Marine Corps to become a road guard! Outstanding, now that's a man with a plan."

"What the holy h-ll is that recruit? You in some kinda glo-belt beauty pageant? Drop and give me 50 maggot!"

"Who's the slimy little Communist sh-t, twinkle-toed, c-cksucker down here who just signed his own death warrant?!"

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 06 Nov 2014

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 06 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• I Informed The Commandant
• DI's Make Us Feel Better
• 189th Marine Corps Birthday

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2014 Marine Corps Birthday Message

Sgt Grit and Staff would like to wish all Marines, both past and present, a very Happy 239th Birthday! Continue to carry on the Marine Corps legacy of honor, courage, and commitment for another 239 years! Semper Fidelis and Gung Ho!


I Informed The Commandant

Army CWO5 Smith photo with Gen Hagee CMC in Iraq

"A Marine is a Marine... There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps

-Iraq, 2004-

Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Hagee, visited his Marines in Iraq for some photo ops at the Al Faw Palace in Baghdad. Marines stood in line to have their picture taken with the Commandant. At the end of the line stood an Army CW04 (me). I informed the Commandant that I served in the Marine Corps in Viet Nam with 2/5 at An Hoa in 1967. I then asked if a former Marine could have his picture taken with the Marine Commandant.

He replied, "Stand next to me, there are no former Marines!"

Mark Smith
CW05 US Army, Retired

Cpl., USMC
2230XXX
1966-68


Youth Full-Zip Soft Shell Jacket with Eagle, Globe, and Anchor Devil Pup Varsity Fleece Jacket with Snap Front

WWII, Med School, Nam

Capt Lea at 93 years old

Capt. D Krause on Lt, Capt. Jim Lea, middle and yours truly on left. Capt. Lea was a Navy Pharm. mate with the Marines in WWII, got out, went to Med school and went back in serving in Nam. That is a total of 33 ribbons on his shirt!

Cheers, Chuck.

Capt. Lea is 93!


1095 Days Left

Sgt Grit,

I still have my Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Ca, Sixth Battalion, Platoon 295, Red Book, from 1953... it's getting a bit old as I am. Brings back so many memories, and I'm wondering if anyone else was in Platoon 295, from August 12th, 1953. Some great pictures, it is like a year book from high school. Shows pictures of Bayonet training, Gas Chamber, Mess Duty, Weapons demo, and various other phases of boot camp training. The DI's were Sgt J. Williams, SDI, PFC G. Quayle JDI, T/Sgt C.W. McCoy CDI. We all had pictures taken and there were 3 platoons, 294, 295 & 296 in the book.

I've read various reports of entering boot camp, and guess the first couple days we all wondered what and the heck did we do when we signed up for 3 years. I remember thinking I've got over 1,095 days left to serve. I still treasure the old book, and fondly remember those days living in the Quonset Huts, hauling sand from the beach and raking the sand, around the Quonset hut so that it looked beautiful. We couldn't wait to get our covers and clothing to bleach out so we didn't look like raw recruits. We even washed them with salt to get them to fade out. We looked pretty good on the parade field. Three months of boot camp and one month of advanced combat training at Camp Pendleton made every one of us a mean, lean, fighting machine. That experience had an effect on my life and at 79 years old I still cherish the experience and am glad to have served the 1095 days. Semper Fi!

Sgt D B Whiting
1953-1956


Finger, Knuckles, Hands

I remember what James M Robinson was talking about with the racetrack. The DI who did that to us Plt. 119, '65 told all of us to go into the huts and get our foot lockers and to standby. When he called for each hut to form on the street, there was three huts if I remember right, my plt. was the first to be called out and anyone who was in the Corps knows what happened next. There was or were screaming, yelling, the use of words nobody ever heard of, fingers, knuckles, hands being crushed. I was lucky.

My bunk along with some other recruits were to the rear of the hut and we watched as the others tried to get through the door. From the position I was at I saw this and could not help but laugh. I know it was wrong but I think anyone who had been there would have done the same thing. This kept up for some time, it seemed like forever. Well it took some time before the guys up front figured out how to get out of that small door and out into the street.

Well there are many stories that I have read in the newsletter that bring it all back. It's a part of our lives that a person will be proud of and never, never forget.

Vic
MCRD '65


DI's Make Us Feel Better

I just finished reading the story about "tie-ties". I had forgotten about using tie-ties to hang our clothes on the line after washing them behind the barracks. I went thru MCRD Parris Island starting in July 1961. I also remember they used green, yellow, red and black flags to fly to indicate the change in daily temperature. On one day our whole platoon lined up and got our medical shots... about three in each shoulder. A few of the shots (like yellow fever) made your arm a little sore or tender. Well our DI's wanted to help us out... so with the black flag flying (temperature at 100+ degrees) he got us out behind the barracks to do some extra push-ups. Then maybe some rifle exercises with our M1's... just to make us feel better.

Semper Fi Marines,
Cpl G. Bradshaw
1941XXX 1961-1967


The Stumps

Sgt. Grit,

During my last couple of months in the Corps in 1971, while stationed at MCB 29 Palms (the stumps), some of us in our engineering company were sent to Big Bear Lake to construct a recreation area for Base Special Services. Just wondering if any of your readers have ever been there, or perhaps were involved in its construction. I was discharged before it was completed, so I never saw how it turned out.

Those couple of months were probably the best I served in the Corps. We lived in tents, had cooks who made our chow, and we ate at a couple of picnic tables set up under the trees. This was in the spring time, and it could get cold at night. At first we had one of those oil heaters in the tent, but it began leaking fuel. So we took a 55 gallon drum, made a door in it (to load wood), hooked up the smoke stack, and we then had a wood heater.

We only had one officer up there with us, I think he was a 1st luey. He was a good guy. As long as we did our job, that was all he really cared about. No inspections, P.T., marching, etc. The popular bar that we went to was called Chad's Place. One of the guy's in our unit moon lighted there as the bouncer. The band they had there (seems like it was the same one every week) would always play the song by Three Dog Night "Joy To The World".

Those were good times.

Active duty Marine, 1967-71


Boot Camp Lance Corporal

I'd like to wish a happy birthday to Tom Arvoy (1963-1967), my closest friend during my enlistment and a good friend during these past 48 years of civilian life. Born 10 November 1943, Tom is lucky enough to have two birthdays on the same day. Happy 71st and Happy 239th, Tom.

Re: Lance Corporal out of boot camp. I did some research and it appears there are some recruits who make L/Cpl out of boot camp. From what I read, the best way to do it is participate in the JROTC program during high school. Be credited with talking two (or more) other numbskulls into joining the Corps (gets you PFC). According to what I read the first two are not necessarily mandatory but they do help. Apparently the thing that will get you L/Cpl out of boot camp is to be selected as the company honor man. We need a current duty Drill Instructor for this one.

Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Jerry D.


USMC Champion Originals Henley Long Sleeve T-shirt


Look At That Pretty Lady

My material grandfather (Stanley Moore) served in the Marines during the early 1900's. (For those of you with a historical bent: I have a photo of him dated 1914, in which he is leaning upon his 1903 .30 Cal, bolt action Springfield rifle in front of his tent, wearing a campaign cover, with a Globe and Anchor emblem in front, a canvas cartridge belt, with bayonet, and a canteen with cover hanging from it stenciled USMC in large black letters. He is dressed in khaki trousers, canvas leggings, and a dark blue shirt).

By the time I returned from 'Nam in early 1969, my grandfather was on his death bed in a facility, and my mother took me to visit him. She warned me before entering his room that he no longer recognized her, or had any memory of his past. I waited at the door to his room until my mother had entered first, at which time I heard him say, "Why look at this pretty lady come to visit me!" As I stepped through the door a couple of seconds later, my grandfather suddenly raised himself up, pointed, and exclaimed, "Why, there's a Marine wearing his expert marksman badge!".

Certain memories never die. Once a Marine, always a Marine!

CPL Ronald H. Mandell
Plt 2030, MCRD San Diego, Oct '67
1st Bridge Co, 7th Eng Battalion, 'Nam '67-'69
Retired Major, US Army


Pumpkin Carving

Thought you might want to share this... It is my understanding a Marine's wife carved this pumpkin. It took her about 16 hours.

Sgt. Dale Mills
1963-1967

Marine Corps pumpkin carving


Bars He Was Wearing

My brother, John L. Sanders, a WWII (Guam & Iwo Jima) Marine was recalled to active duty for Korea. Since he now had a degree from OU, he was selected for OCS and then Basic School. In the summer of 1951 my Mother and I visited him and his family in Alexander, VA. Since I would be a senior in the fall when school started he asked what my plans were. During WWII when ever we played war, I was always a Marine, so I told him I guess I would enlist in the Marine Corps after graduating from High School.

My brother had recognized Jim Weatherall at Quantico and had asked him what he was doing there. He told my brother that he was there on the NROTC program and explained the program to him. He also provided my brother with the address of NROTC MOI at OU. My brother asked me if I would like to go in as and officer. Of course I was looking at the bars he was wearing and I said: "Sure!"

I took the address he gave me and wrote a letter to the NROTC MOI at OU. The rest is history. It's great to have a Marine looking out for his baby brother.

Joe Sanders, Major USMC (ret.)


He Then Said "Go home"

Went to MCRD on March 6, 1961 and was assigned to Platoon 220. We left MCRD 3 times before graduation. 1. Going to Camp Matthews for the rifle range. 2. Going to Balboa Naval Hospital to give blood and the Navy fed us steak dinners with all the fixings. Have had many great steaks since, many a lot better, but I still remember that great meal. 3. We went to a San Diego Chargers game. They were brand new and were in the AFL playing Spring/Summer games. I don't remember who they played but it also was the most remembered football game I ever attended. For a few brief hours I felt free even though we were under the constant watch of our 3 DI's and other authority figures.

Likewise the mob from across the bay "Navy Recruits" were there. Must have been the same bunch that every one else has commented on. They couldn't march in step or anything else.

I also only did one tour and got out. Vietnam came and I thought about getting in the fight. I had volunteered to go to Vietnam in the summer of 1963. Was with B Company 3rd Amtracs and we had a company of amphibian trucks that were going to Vietnam. They were taking one Radio Tech. I wasn't chosen. Any way in 1965 I went to see the Marine Recruiter about Vietnam. He asked if I was nuts or what. I was in the Individual Ready Reserve. He told me the Corps had my address and phone number and if they needed me they would call. He then said "Go home". I went home. Always wondered about that choice. Anyway I am a Marine and Always will Be.

Semper Fi
Gerry Schemel
Cpl of Marines
195XXXX


500 Holiday Boxes For The Troops

Women Marines Association (WMA) Press Release

Holiday Troops Support Press Release

The Women Marines Association (WMA), The Romeo Masonic Temple, the Romeo Post Office and the surrounding community comes together to pack 500 boxes to ship to our service members deployed in harm's way. On 15 November the women Marines of the Women Marines Association will once again work with the Romeo Masonic Temple and the Romeo Post office to pack up 500 holiday boxes for the troops.

The packing will be at the Romeo Masonic Temple located at 231 N. Main, Romeo, MI from 10am to 2:30pm.

The Motor City Chapter of WMA has been sending boxes to our troops since 2004. Marines taking care of our military. This support of course could never happen without the dedicated support of the community. During the holidays we always ship keeping in mind that our military service members are away from those they love. Each package, with card and letter lets them know that they are not alone. They are in the hearts of each and every American and that each box is From Romeo with Love.

As we wind down military operations they also are winding down the supplies that are sent. Most meals consist of MRE's and little more. Our troops are asking for protein items, personal hygiene items and beverage mixes. Hot chocolate and the powered instant cappuccino mixes have been requested.

Join us as we help our fellow service members. Bring your items, help us pack and share the camaraderie and Esprit. WMA ships to all branches of the military. If you can't attend you can still sponsor a box. Each box costs $15.90. Help us make a difference one box at a time. Monetary donations go 100% for postage. Donations can be brought the day of the event or sent to WMA Motor City, PO Box 590, Romeo, MI 48065. We thank you for your support.

Mary Ann Merritt
WMA National PRO
WMA MI2 Motor City


189th Marine Corps Birthday

189th Marine Corps Birthday Program Cover Okinawa 1964

189th Marine Corps Birthday Program 1964 Bn and Hqtrs Battery Pages

Marine Corps Birthday 1964. I celebrated the 189th USMC Birthday with Headquarters 4th Battalion, 12th Marines on Okinawa in 1964.

It doesn't seem like its been 50 years.

PFC KEITH
2d HvyArtyRktBtry, 2d FAG
Hq Btry, 10th Marines
Hq Btry, 4th Bn, 12th Marines


Proudly Displayed

Back of Jerry's Truck

Back of Jerry's RV

I've had my truck for a few years and have proudly displayed USMC products I've purchased from Sgt. Grit on it. I got my RV this year and as you can see I've already started with EGA's over the tail lights as well as the USMC memorial. It looks good but it would look great with a larger one of the memorial on the back though.

Jerry LaFreniere

Get the highlighted tail light decals at:

Eagle, Globe and Anchor 4 Tail Light Decal

Eagle, Globe and Anchor 4" Tail Light Decal


Belleau Wood

Recently there was a lot of press on the Anniversary of WWI. We all know about Belleau Wood. This is what it looks like today courtesy of the Smithsonian Magazine.

Don Harkness

What Belleau Wood looks like today


Fun Loving Jokers

Sgt Grit,

Loved reading about the 'smoking lamp' in boot camp. I remember one memorable day in boot camp, 1964. One of our DIs, it may have been SSgt Bridges, not sure, but he announced that, "The smoking lamp is lit for one cigarette!" As the smokers frantically readied themselves, the DI added, "And I'm smoking it!" Ah, it was at moments like that when I was glad I didn't smoke. Yep, sometimes those DIs were just fun-loving jokers, weren't they!

Semper Fi!
B. Lonn
MCRD San Diego, Spring, 1964


Practice Falling Down

Remember at Cherry Point Air Station - Staff NCO Witticisms - and other humorous incidents arounf the Corps!

We had an old black and white TV in the Rec Room - someone got a few old stuffed chairs and some old wooden chairs in rows before the TV. Naturally the TV shows were not like they have now - and no cable or internet then either. Remember we had shows like Halabaloo - and ShinDig - girls in tight skirts and tight sweaters dancing - and remember Joey Heatherton in a shirt skirt driving us lonely Marines with envy once a week. Marines knew how to express themselves in the way we understood each other -- One dancer had a superb backside - and Lo and Behold one S/Sgt returning from the Staff Club looked in on us lowly Marines - and took one look at the girl on the TV and commented, "Look at the Sh-tter on her." We laughed so hard we were crying and he in a one beer too many gesture - said - "Carry On Men."

We had a Gunny who held muster at the Warehouse where we worked - and he would hold mail call after he read us our daily schedules. He was harsh about being there on time and standing tall in formation - before he called us to "At Ease". One day some Corporal heads the formation and holds mail call first - then a few sh-tbirds leave formation from the rear - and the Gunny shows up and sees some have split - so he calls us to Attention and Holds another Roll Call. The Captain (Group Supply Officer, with the Master Sergeant show up to say a few words after muster.) The Corporal calls out the names - and naturally the biggest screw-up is not in formation - his name is called three times - the Gunny is p-ssed - and tells me find his sorry asz and bring Pvt. Sh-tbird to him. The moron is sitting in a stall in the head reading his mail -- I bring him back to the Formation - and the Gunny goes off on him. The Private gets written up - and I was on telephone watch during lunch time outside the Captain's Office when the Gunny is inside and overhear conversation between them - as the Captain says to the Gunny that he cannot write on Office Hours that "Private Thomaselli was in the sh-thouse reading his mail for missing a muster?"

P.S. The Private got a strong reprimand from the First Sgt. who was a great Marine and friendly with us Marines in the Squadron. The Private eventually made PFC and when the Gunny announced that Pvt. Thomaselli was now a PFC the PFC asked the tall Gunny to bend down as the new PFC wanted to tell him a secret - The Gunny bent down and crazy Tomasellli kissed him on the cheek. The Gunny went Ape Sh-t yelling and the whole formation laughed.

At the enlisted club one night - in the head - we had a urinal like a trough and about 4 Marines could shoulder with about 5 or six deep to release the beer from the pitchers we put away - One clown taps the guy in front of him to hurry him along - but the guy in front turns around sh-t-faced and urinates on 3 other Marines in line waiting.

In Washington, DC in a bar - they had a lot of servicemen as bouncers - in one bar two guys get into a shoving match and a bouncer with the Marine Corps Bulldog Tattoo - grabs them both and tells them to behave or take it outside. One guy wants the bouncer to exit with them - I took one look at the massive forearms and wide shoulders on Mr. Bulldog - and told both guys - "Why don't you two go outside and practice falling down a few times." The Marine laughs and throws them out - and asks me if I want a job there!

Bruce Bender
1963-1967 CPL
Vietnam Era Marine


General Chesty

General Chesty Foot Ferry

Admiral Jack Foot Ferry

It is a foot ferry that runs between Port Orchard and Bremerton Wa. There is also an Admiral Jack. My son-in-law is a Marine. Going on ten years.

Ann


Radar Operator

While reading an article in the most recent Sgt. Grit news I came across an article which supposedly listed all the various MOS's that were in use by the Marine Corps in Vietnam. This article was written by a Tom Tilque and gave the address of the listings. After checking to see if my mos was listed I found that the list did not list the MOS of 6741 Radar Operator. I enlisted the Marine Corps in Feb. 1958 under the "delayed entry program" and upon graduation from High School in June 1958 I was sent to MCRD San Diego where I was a part of Recruit Training Plt. 151. Upon graduation from boot camp I was sent to "aviation Prep School at NAS JAX, Fl. Upon completion of that school I was sent back out to MCRD where I was trained as a Radar Operator MOS 6741. Upon completion of Radar Operator school I was assigned to Marine Air Control Squadron - 7 at MCAF New River, NC. MACS-7 as a unit was deployed to NAS Atsugi, Japan in 1961 and upon completion of my tour in Japan I was assigned to MACS-1 at MCAF Yuma, Az. In 1964 I was sent to the FAAWTC command at Pt' Loma, San Diego where as a Cpl I was assigned (TAD) to the Ground Control Intercept Course which was a course taught my the Navy to train young Officers and Senior Petty Officers in the MOS 6709. I was the only Marine in the class and the lowest (E-4) ranking student in the class. Upon completion I was assigned a secondary MOS of 6709 and I believe at the time I was the only Cpl (E-4) in the Marines to have gone though this course. I returned to MACS-1 in Yuma where I was a Ground Controlled Intercept controller. During the next 18 months I was assigned as a Controller and on a daily bases controlled both Navy and Marine Corps pilots in the training of air intercepts, amassing approx. 2,000 intercepts while training Marine and Navy pilots flying the latest (F-4's and F-8U) type attack/fighter aircraft. In May 1966, I was transferred to MACS-7 which had now been re-deployed from NAS Atsugi, Japan to Chu-lai Vietnam and from there I was sent as the SNCO to the early warning detachment from MACS-7 at Phu-Bai Vietnam and on Feb. 26th, 1967, I was wounded during a mortar attack on the Hue/Phu-Bai airport, and due to my wounds sent back to my parent unit MACS-7 in Chu-Lai and returned home in June 1967.

After the completion of my then current enlistment in Aug 1967 I chose another line of service to our country, that of a Law Enforcement Officer and became a California Highway Patrolman and retired from the Patrol after 29 years in 1996... If there are any other members of either MACS-1 or MACS-7 out there that read these letters from Sgt. Grit, I'd like to hear from them.

Gerald A. Caughman
S/Sgt of Marines 1820xxx/6741/6709
1958-1967


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #1)

Mom interrupted. She said "I presume you are on leave. When do you have to go back?" I replied "Really, I do not have to be back until midnight on the 17th, but I think I will go back late tomorrow night and save as much leave as possible. She said "Oh, I wish you would stay longer. We haven't seen you for more than a year." I said "I'm not driving to N.Y.C. anymore. I'll be back on Friday night - between midnight and 1:00 AM - and I will be here until about 7:00 PM on Sunday." She said "Okay. That sounds good." I told her "I had not told you but I extended my enlistment for another six years on August 4th." Now back to the demise of the Hudson. I was returning to the base from N.Y.C. and had just passed Emporia, Va. when I felt too tired to continue. This had never happened before. I said "I am going to have to stop and rest for an hour - unless there is someone that would care to do the driving." There was no response. All were asleep. I pulled over to rest. When I came to a stop all got awake. I was asked why we had stopped. I said "I am too tired to drive and stopped to rest for an hour or so - unless someone would like to do the driving. The fellow on the far right, who worked in the disbursing office, said "I'll drive." He was from Brooklyn and had been sleeping since we left N.Y.C. I thought nothing of it. We changed seats. He started out and I went to sleep. We had gone only about 15 miles - had not reached Weldon, N.C. - when there was one helluva crash. All got out of the car. The Hudson was almost turned onto its right side. The left side had been ripped from the car. No one was injured. The driver of a tractor-trailer ran over to see if there was anyone hurt. Then he ran down the road to see if anyone was hurt in the other car. There was not. But the driver of that car, a 1950 Buick Roadmaster convertible, said "I don't want any police report. The semi driver said "Why not? The other driver was at fault!" He replied "The lady I am with is my boss's wife and if there is a police report I'll lose my job." The semi driver said "Tell her to get up in the cab of my truck as though she was my passenger." He called for 2 tow trucks but did not notify police. Cars headed for the base started to stop. They were shocked to see the Hudson in a ditch. He said he could take one. I told the fellow that had been driving "You get the H-ll out of here - just in case the police show up."

He was not around if there was a police response. Another car stopped. He took two more. And a third car took two more. The tow trucks arrived. The tow truck operators agreed "These two cars are a "total loss" and hauled them away. They had given me a couple of their business cards. There never was any police response. I was the last to get on my way to Camp Lejeune. I am sure you are wondering what happened. The Hudson had made a foolish attempt to pass the semi on an upgrade. The semi driver saw a car coming from the opposite direction and applied the brakes as he pulled to the right. My driver moved to the right as did the approaching car. They hit left hand headlight to left hand headlight at an estimated combined speed of about 130 M.P.H. The entire left sides of both cars were ripped off - stem to stern.

Happy Birthday and Semper Fi to 'You All'!

The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Happy 350th Birthday Royal Marines!

View the Royal Marines 350th Anniversary video.


I just finished reading this week's (29/30Oct14) issue of your fine newsletter and was pleased to see one of my TBS (class 4-66) and FtSill (class 5-66) classmates contributing. Welcome aboard, "Hoogie!"

Semper Fi!

Tom Downey
(once a captain, USMCR - always a Marine)


I was at Parris Island from July to October in 1962. Plt. 352. We used tie ties.

Charlie Ducar
Cpl. of Marines


A crash fire and rescue man has an MOS of 7051. Someone in your newsletters was asking what the designation was. In war time like Vietnam they are still crash crew men by day and guard duty at night. I am MSgt (E8) Frank Peace a former crash crew man.


Quotes

"I come in peace, I didn't bring artillery. But I am pleading with you with tears in my eyes: If you f-ck with me, I'll kill you all."
--Marine General James Mattis, to Iraqi tribal leaders.


"All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means work. Work is not a curse; it is the prerogative of intelligence, the only means to manhood, and the measure of civilization."
--President Calvin Coolidge


"Hell, these are Marines. Men like them held Guadalcanal and took Iwo Jima. Bagdad ain't sh-t."
--Marine Major General John F. Kelly


"We signed up knowing the risk. Those innocent people in New York didn't go to work thinking there was any kind of risk."
--Pvt. Mike Armendariz-Clark, USMC; Afghanastan, 20 September 2001 As reported on page 1 of the New York Times


"[It is an] essential, unalterable right in nature, engrafted into the British constitution as a fundamental law, and ever held sacred and irrevocable by the subjects within the realm, that what a man has honestly acquired is absolutely his own, which he may freely give, but cannot be taken from him without his consent."
--Samuel Adams, [1768]


"Private, how much rent are you collecting from the visitors living in the bore."

"Attack! Attack! Attack!"

"The best part about being a Marine is that all the sissies were weeded out."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 06 NOV 2014

In this issue:
• I Informed The Commandant
• DI's Make Us Feel Better
• 189th Marine Corps Birthday

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Sgt Grit and Staff would like to wish all Marines, both past and present, a very Happy 239th Birthday! Continue to carry on the Marine Corps legacy of honor, courage, and commitment for another 239 years! Semper Fidelis and Gung Ho!


I Informed The Commandant

"A Marine is a Marine... There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps

-Iraq, 2004-

Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Hagee, visited his Marines in Iraq for some photo ops at the Al Faw Palace in Baghdad. Marines stood in line to have their picture taken with the Commandant. At the end of the line stood an Army CW04 (me). I informed the Commandant that I served in the Marine Corps in Viet Nam with 2/5 at An Hoa in 1967. I then asked if a former Marine could have his picture taken with the Marine Commandant.

He replied, "Stand next to me, there are no former Marines!"

Mark Smith
CW05 US Army, Retired

Cpl., USMC
2230XXX
1966-68


WWII, Med School, Nam

Capt. D Krause on Lt, Capt. Jim Lea, middle and yours truly on left. Capt. Lea was a Navy Pharm. mate with the Marines in WWII, got out, went to Med school and went back in serving in Nam. That is a total of 33 ribbons on his shirt!

Cheers, Chuck.

Capt. Lea is 93!


1095 Days Left

Sgt Grit,

I still have my Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Ca, Sixth Battalion, Platoon 295, Red Book, from 1953... it's getting a bit old as I am. Brings back so many memories, and I'm wondering if anyone else was in Platoon 295, from August 12th, 1953. Some great pictures, it is like a year book from high school. Shows pictures of Bayonet training, Gas Chamber, Mess Duty, Weapons demo, and various other phases of boot camp training. The DI's were Sgt J. Williams, SDI, PFC G. Quayle JDI, T/Sgt C.W. McCoy CDI. We all had pictures taken and there were 3 platoons, 294, 295 & 296 in the book.

I've read various reports of entering boot camp, and guess the first couple days we all wondered what and the heck did we do when we signed up for 3 years. I remember thinking I've got over 1,095 days left to serve. I still treasure the old book, and fondly remember those days living in the Quonset Huts, hauling sand from the beach and raking the sand, around the Quonset hut so that it looked beautiful. We couldn't wait to get our covers and clothing to bleach out so we didn't look like raw recruits. We even washed them with salt to get them to fade out. We looked pretty good on the parade field. Three months of boot camp and one month of advanced combat training at Camp Pendleton made every one of us a mean, lean, fighting machine. That experience had an effect on my life and at 79 years old I still cherish the experience and am glad to have served the 1095 days. Semper Fi!

Sgt D B Whiting
1953-1956


Finger, Knuckles, Hands

I remember what James M Robinson was talking about with the racetrack. The DI who did that to us Plt. 119, '65 told all of us to go into the huts and get our foot lockers and to standby. When he called for each hut to form on the street, there was three huts if I remember right, my plt. was the first to be called out and anyone who was in the Corps knows what happened next. There was or were screaming, yelling, the use of words nobody ever heard of, fingers, knuckles, hands being crushed. I was lucky.

My bunk along with some other recruits were to the rear of the hut and we watched as the others tried to get through the door. From the position I was at I saw this and could not help but laugh. I know it was wrong but I think anyone who had been there would have done the same thing. This kept up for some time, it seemed like forever. Well it took some time before the guys up front figured out how to get out of that small door and out into the street.

Well there are many stories that I have read in the newsletter that bring it all back. It's a part of our lives that a person will be proud of and never, never forget.

Vic
MCRD '65


DI's Make Us Feel Better

I just finished reading the story about "tie-ties". I had forgotten about using tie-ties to hang our clothes on the line after washing them behind the barracks. I went thru MCRD Parris Island starting in July 1961. I also remember they used green, yellow, red and black flags to fly to indicate the change in daily temperature. On one day our whole platoon lined up and got our medical shots... about three in each shoulder. A few of the shots (like yellow fever) made your arm a little sore or tender. Well our DI's wanted to help us out... so with the black flag flying (temperature at 100+ degrees) he got us out behind the barracks to do some extra push-ups. Then maybe some rifle exercises with our M1's... just to make us feel better.

Semper Fi Marines,
Cpl G. Bradshaw
1941XXX 1961-1967


The Stumps

Sgt. Grit,

During my last couple of months in the Corps in 1971, while stationed at MCB 29 Palms (the stumps), some of us in our engineering company were sent to Big Bear Lake to construct a recreation area for Base Special Services. Just wondering if any of your readers have ever been there, or perhaps were involved in its construction. I was discharged before it was completed, so I never saw how it turned out.

Those couple of months were probably the best I served in the Corps. We lived in tents, had cooks who made our chow, and we ate at a couple of picnic tables set up under the trees. This was in the spring time, and it could get cold at night. At first we had one of those oil heaters in the tent, but it began leaking fuel. So we took a 55 gallon drum, made a door in it (to load wood), hooked up the smoke stack, and we then had a wood heater.

We only had one officer up there with us, I think he was a 1st luey. He was a good guy. As long as we did our job, that was all he really cared about. No inspections, P.T., marching, etc. The popular bar that we went to was called Chad's Place. One of the guy's in our unit moon lighted there as the bouncer. The band they had there (seems like it was the same one every week) would always play the song by Three Dog Night "Joy To The World".

Those were good times.

Active duty Marine, 1967-71


Boot Camp Lance Corporal

I'd like to wish a happy birthday to Tom Arvoy (1963-1967), my closest friend during my enlistment and a good friend during these past 48 years of civilian life. Born 10 November 1943, Tom is lucky enough to have two birthdays on the same day. Happy 71st and Happy 239th, Tom.

Re: Lance Corporal out of boot camp. I did some research and it appears there are some recruits who make L/Cpl out of boot camp. From what I read, the best way to do it is participate in the JROTC program during high school. Be credited with talking two (or more) other numbskulls into joining the Corps (gets you PFC). According to what I read the first two are not necessarily mandatory but they do help. Apparently the thing that will get you L/Cpl out of boot camp is to be selected as the company honor man. We need a current duty Drill Instructor for this one.

Forged on the anvil of discipline.
The Few. The Proud.
Jerry D.


Look At That Pretty Lady

My material grandfather (Stanley Moore) served in the Marines during the early 1900's. (For those of you with a historical bent: I have a photo of him dated 1914, in which he is leaning upon his 1903 .30 Cal, bolt action Springfield rifle in front of his tent, wearing a campaign cover, with a Globe and Anchor emblem in front, a canvas cartridge belt, with bayonet, and a canteen with cover hanging from it stenciled USMC in large black letters. He is dressed in khaki trousers, canvas leggings, and a dark blue shirt).

By the time I returned from 'Nam in early 1969, my grandfather was on his death bed in a facility, and my mother took me to visit him. She warned me before entering his room that he no longer recognized her, or had any memory of his past. I waited at the door to his room until my mother had entered first, at which time I heard him say, "Why look at this pretty lady come to visit me!" As I stepped through the door a couple of seconds later, my grandfather suddenly raised himself up, pointed, and exclaimed, "Why, there's a Marine wearing his expert marksman badge!".

Certain memories never die. Once a Marine, always a Marine!

CPL Ronald H. Mandell
Plt 2030, MCRD San Diego, Oct '67
1st Bridge Co, 7th Eng Battalion, 'Nam '67-'69
Retired Major, US Army


Pumpkin Carving

Thought you might want to share this... It is my understanding a Marine's wife carved this pumpkin. It took her about 16 hours.

Sgt. Dale Mills
1963-1967


Bars He Was Wearing

My brother, John L. Sanders, a WWII (Guam & Iwo Jima) Marine was recalled to active duty for Korea. Since he now had a degree from OU, he was selected for OCS and then Basic School. In the summer of 1951 my Mother and I visited him and his family in Alexander, VA. Since I would be a senior in the fall when school started he asked what my plans were. During WWII when ever we played war, I was always a Marine, so I told him I guess I would enlist in the Marine Corps after graduating from High School.

My brother had recognized Jim Weatherall at Quantico and had asked him what he was doing there. He told my brother that he was there on the NROTC program and explained the program to him. He also provided my brother with the address of NROTC MOI at OU. My brother asked me if I would like to go in as and officer. Of course I was looking at the bars he was wearing and I said: "Sure!"

I took the address he gave me and wrote a letter to the NROTC MOI at OU. The rest is history. It's great to have a Marine looking out for his baby brother.

Joe Sanders, Major USMC (ret.)


He Then Said "Go home"

Went to MCRD on March 6, 1961 and was assigned to Platoon 220. We left MCRD 3 times before graduation. 1. Going to Camp Matthews for the rifle range. 2. Going to Balboa Naval Hospital to give blood and the Navy fed us steak dinners with all the fixings. Have had many great steaks since, many a lot better, but I still remember that great meal. 3. We went to a San Diego Chargers game. They were brand new and were in the AFL playing Spring/Summer games. I don't remember who they played but it also was the most remembered football game I ever attended. For a few brief hours I felt free even though we were under the constant watch of our 3 DI's and other authority figures.

Likewise the mob from across the bay "Navy Recruits" were there. Must have been the same bunch that every one else has commented on. They couldn't march in step or anything else.

I also only did one tour and got out. Vietnam came and I thought about getting in the fight. I had volunteered to go to Vietnam in the summer of 1963. Was with B Company 3rd Amtracs and we had a company of amphibian trucks that were going to Vietnam. They were taking one Radio Tech. I wasn't chosen. Any way in 1965 I went to see the Marine Recruiter about Vietnam. He asked if I was nuts or what. I was in the Individual Ready Reserve. He told me the Corps had my address and phone number and if they needed me they would call. He then said "Go home". I went home. Always wondered about that choice. Anyway I am a Marine and Always will Be.

Semper Fi
Gerry Schemel
Cpl of Marines
195XXXX


500 Holiday Boxes For The Troops

The Women Marines Association (WMA), The Romeo Masonic Temple, the Romeo Post Office and the surrounding community comes together to pack 500 boxes to ship to our service members deployed in harm's way. On 15 November the women Marines of the Women Marines Association will once again work with the Romeo Masonic Temple and the Romeo Post office to pack up 500 holiday boxes for the troops.

The packing will be at the Romeo Masonic Temple located at 231 N. Main, Romeo, MI from 10am to 2:30pm.

The Motor City Chapter of WMA has been sending boxes to our troops since 2004. Marines taking care of our military. This support of course could never happen without the dedicated support of the community. During the holidays we always ship keeping in mind that our military service members are away from those they love. Each package, with card and letter lets them know that they are not alone. They are in the hearts of each and every American and that each box is From Romeo with Love.

As we wind down military operations they also are winding down the supplies that are sent. Most meals consist of MRE's and little more. Our troops are asking for protein items, personal hygiene items and beverage mixes. Hot chocolate and the powered instant cappuccino mixes have been requested.

Join us as we help our fellow service members. Bring your items, help us pack and share the camaraderie and Esprit. WMA ships to all branches of the military. If you can't attend you can still sponsor a box. Each box costs $15.90. Help us make a difference one box at a time. Monetary donations go 100% for postage. Donations can be brought the day of the event or sent to WMA Motor City, PO Box 590, Romeo, MI 48065. We thank you for your support.

Mary Ann Merritt
WMA National PRO
WMA MI2 Motor City


189th Marine Corps Birthday

Marine Corps Birthday 1964. I celebrated the 189th USMC Birthday with Headquarters 4th Battalion, 12th Marines on Okinawa in 1964.

It doesn't seem like its been 50 years.

PFC KEITH
2d HvyArtyRktBtry, 2d FAG
Hq Btry, 10th Marines
Hq Btry, 4th Bn, 12th Marines


Proudly Displayed

I've had my truck for a few years and have proudly displayed USMC products I've purchased from Sgt. Grit on it. I got my RV this year and as you can see I've already started with EGA's over the tail lights as well as the USMC memorial. It looks good but it would look great with a larger one of the memorial on the back though.

Jerry LaFreniere

Get the highlighted tail light decals at:

Eagle, Globe and Anchor 4" Tail Light Decal


Belleau Wood

Recently there was a lot of press on the Anniversary of WWI. We all know about Belleau Wood. This is what it looks like today courtesy of the Smithsonian Magazine.

Don Harkness


Fun Loving Jokers

Sgt Grit,

Loved reading about the 'smoking lamp' in boot camp. I remember one memorable day in boot camp, 1964. One of our DIs, it may have been SSgt Bridges, not sure, but he announced that, "The smoking lamp is lit for one cigarette!" As the smokers frantically readied themselves, the DI added, "And I'm smoking it!" Ah, it was at moments like that when I was glad I didn't smoke. Yep, sometimes those DIs were just fun-loving jokers, weren't they!

Semper Fi!
B. Lonn
MCRD San Diego, Spring, 1964


Practice Falling Down

Remember at Cherry Point Air Station - Staff NCO Witticisms - and other humorous incidents arounf the Corps!

We had an old black and white TV in the Rec Room - someone got a few old stuffed chairs and some old wooden chairs in rows before the TV. Naturally the TV shows were not like they have now - and no cable or internet then either. Remember we had shows like Halabaloo - and ShinDig - girls in tight skirts and tight sweaters dancing - and remember Joey Heatherton in a shirt skirt driving us lonely Marines with envy once a week. Marines knew how to express themselves in the way we understood each other -- One dancer had a superb backside - and Lo and Behold one S/Sgt returning from the Staff Club looked in on us lowly Marines - and took one look at the girl on the TV and commented, "Look at the Sh-tter on her." We laughed so hard we were crying and he in a one beer too many gesture - said - "Carry On Men."

We had a Gunny who held muster at the Warehouse where we worked - and he would hold mail call after he read us our daily schedules. He was harsh about being there on time and standing tall in formation - before he called us to "At Ease". One day some Corporal heads the formation and holds mail call first - then a few sh-tbirds leave formation from the rear - and the Gunny shows up and sees some have split - so he calls us to Attention and Holds another Roll Call. The Captain (Group Supply Officer, with the Master Sergeant show up to say a few words after muster.) The Corporal calls out the names - and naturally the biggest screw-up is not in formation - his name is called three times - the Gunny is p-ssed - and tells me find his sorry asz and bring Pvt. Sh-tbird to him. The moron is sitting in a stall in the head reading his mail -- I bring him back to the Formation - and the Gunny goes off on him. The Private gets written up - and I was on telephone watch during lunch time outside the Captain's Office when the Gunny is inside and overhear conversation between them - as the Captain says to the Gunny that he cannot write on Office Hours that "Private Thomaselli was in the sh-thouse reading his mail for missing a muster?"

P.S. The Private got a strong reprimand from the First Sgt. who was a great Marine and friendly with us Marines in the Squadron. The Private eventually made PFC and when the Gunny announced that Pvt. Thomaselli was now a PFC the PFC asked the tall Gunny to bend down as the new PFC wanted to tell him a secret - The Gunny bent down and crazy Tomasellli kissed him on the cheek. The Gunny went Ape Sh-t yelling and the whole formation laughed.

At the enlisted club one night - in the head - we had a urinal like a trough and about 4 Marines could shoulder with about 5 or six deep to release the beer from the pitchers we put away - One clown taps the guy in front of him to hurry him along - but the guy in front turns around sh-t-faced and urinates on 3 other Marines in line waiting.

In Washington, DC in a bar - they had a lot of servicemen as bouncers - in one bar two guys get into a shoving match and a bouncer with the Marine Corps Bulldog Tattoo - grabs them both and tells them to behave or take it outside. One guy wants the bouncer to exit with them - I took one look at the massive forearms and wide shoulders on Mr. Bulldog - and told both guys - "Why don't you two go outside and practice falling down a few times." The Marine laughs and throws them out - and asks me if I want a job there!

Bruce Bender
1963-1967 CPL
Vietnam Era Marine


General Chesty

It is a foot ferry that runs between Port Orchard and Bremerton Wa. There is also an Admiral Jack. My son-in-law is a Marine. Going on ten years.

Ann


Radar Operator

While reading an article in the most recent Sgt. Grit news I came across an article which supposedly listed all the various MOS's that were in use by the Marine Corps in Vietnam. This article was written by a Tom Tilque and gave the address of the listings. After checking to see if my mos was listed I found that the list did not list the MOS of 6741 Radar Operator. I enlisted the Marine Corps in Feb. 1958 under the "delayed entry program" and upon graduation from High School in June 1958 I was sent to MCRD San Diego where I was a part of Recruit Training Plt. 151. Upon graduation from boot camp I was sent to "aviation Prep School at NAS JAX, Fl. Upon completion of that school I was sent back out to MCRD where I was trained as a Radar Operator MOS 6741. Upon completion of Radar Operator school I was assigned to Marine Air Control Squadron - 7 at MCAF New River, NC. MACS-7 as a unit was deployed to NAS Atsugi, Japan in 1961 and upon completion of my tour in Japan I was assigned to MACS-1 at MCAF Yuma, Az. In 1964 I was sent to the FAAWTC command at Pt' Loma, San Diego where as a Cpl I was assigned (TAD) to the Ground Control Intercept Course which was a course taught my the Navy to train young Officers and Senior Petty Officers in the MOS 6709. I was the only Marine in the class and the lowest (E-4) ranking student in the class. Upon completion I was assigned a secondary MOS of 6709 and I believe at the time I was the only Cpl (E-4) in the Marines to have gone though this course. I returned to MACS-1 in Yuma where I was a Ground Controlled Intercept controller. During the next 18 months I was assigned as a Controller and on a daily bases controlled both Navy and Marine Corps pilots in the training of air intercepts, amassing approx. 2,000 intercepts while training Marine and Navy pilots flying the latest (F-4's and F-8U) type attack/fighter aircraft. In May 1966, I was transferred to MACS-7 which had now been re-deployed from NAS Atsugi, Japan to Chu-lai Vietnam and from there I was sent as the SNCO to the early warning detachment from MACS-7 at Phu-Bai Vietnam and on Feb. 26th, 1967, I was wounded during a mortar attack on the Hue/Phu-Bai airport, and due to my wounds sent back to my parent unit MACS-7 in Chu-Lai and returned home in June 1967.

After the completion of my then current enlistment in Aug 1967 I chose another line of service to our country, that of a Law Enforcement Officer and became a California Highway Patrolman and retired from the Patrol after 29 years in 1996... If there are any other members of either MACS-1 or MACS-7 out there that read these letters from Sgt. Grit, I'd like to hear from them.

Gerald A. Caughman
S/Sgt of Marines 1820xxx/6741/6709
1958-1967


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #11, #1)

Mom interrupted. She said "I presume you are on leave. When do you have to go back?" I replied "Really, I do not have to be back until midnight on the 17th, but I think I will go back late tomorrow night and save as much leave as possible. She said "Oh, I wish you would stay longer. We haven't seen you for more than a year." I said "I'm not driving to N.Y.C. anymore. I'll be back on Friday night - between midnight and 1:00 AM - and I will be here until about 7:00 PM on Sunday." She said "Okay. That sounds good." I told her "I had not told you but I extended my enlistment for another six years on August 4th." Now back to the demise of the Hudson. I was returning to the base from N.Y.C. and had just passed Emporia, Va. when I felt too tired to continue. This had never happened before. I said "I am going to have to stop and rest for an hour - unless there is someone that would care to do the driving." There was no response. All were asleep. I pulled over to rest. When I came to a stop all got awake. I was asked why we had stopped. I said "I am too tired to drive and stopped to rest for an hour or so - unless someone would like to do the driving. The fellow on the far right, who worked in the disbursing office, said "I'll drive." He was from Brooklyn and had been sleeping since we left N.Y.C. I thought nothing of it. We changed seats. He started out and I went to sleep. We had gone only about 15 miles - had not reached Weldon, N.C. - when there was one helluva crash. All got out of the car. The Hudson was almost turned onto its right side. The left side had been ripped from the car. No one was injured. The driver of a tractor-trailer ran over to see if there was anyone hurt. Then he ran down the road to see if anyone was hurt in the other car. There was not. But the driver of that car, a 1950 Buick Roadmaster convertible, said "I don't want any police report. The semi driver said "Why not? The other driver was at fault!" He replied "The lady I am with is my boss's wife and if there is a police report I'll lose my job." The semi driver said "Tell her to get up in the cab of my truck as though she was my passenger." He called for 2 tow trucks but did not notify police. Cars headed for the base started to stop. They were shocked to see the Hudson in a ditch. He said he could take one. I told the fellow that had been driving "You get the H-ll out of here - just in case the police show up."

He was not around if there was a police response. Another car stopped. He took two more. And a third car took two more. The tow trucks arrived. The tow truck operators agreed "These two cars are a "total loss" and hauled them away. They had given me a couple of their business cards. There never was any police response. I was the last to get on my way to Camp Lejeune. I am sure you are wondering what happened. The Hudson had made a foolish attempt to pass the semi on an upgrade. The semi driver saw a car coming from the opposite direction and applied the brakes as he pulled to the right. My driver moved to the right as did the approaching car. They hit left hand headlight to left hand headlight at an estimated combined speed of about 130 M.P.H. The entire left sides of both cars were ripped off - stem to stern.

Happy Birthday and Semper Fi to 'You All'!

The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Short Rounds

Happy 350th Birthday Royal Marines!

View the Royal Marines 350th Anniversary video.


I just finished reading this week's (29/30Oct14) issue of your fine newsletter and was pleased to see one of my TBS (class 4-66) and FtSill (class 5-66) classmates contributing. Welcome aboard, "Hoogie!"

Semper Fi!

Tom Downey
(once a captain, USMCR - always a Marine)


I was at Parris Island from July to October in 1962. Plt. 352. We used tie ties.

Charlie Ducar
Cpl. of Marines


A crash fire and rescue man has an MOS of 7051. Someone in your newsletters was asking what the designation was. In war time like Vietnam they are still crash crew men by day and guard duty at night. I am MSgt (E8) Frank Peace a former crash crew man.


Quotes

"I come in peace, I didn't bring artillery. But I am pleading with you with tears in my eyes: If you f-ck with me, I'll kill you all."
--Marine General James Mattis, to Iraqi tribal leaders.


"All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means work. Work is not a curse; it is the prerogative of intelligence, the only means to manhood, and the measure of civilization."
--President Calvin Coolidge


"Hell, these are Marines. Men like them held Guadalcanal and took Iwo Jima. Bagdad ain't sh-t."
--Marine Major General John F. Kelly


"We signed up knowing the risk. Those innocent people in New York didn't go to work thinking there was any kind of risk."
--Pvt. Mike Armendariz-Clark, USMC; Afghanastan, 20 September 2001 As reported on page 1 of the New York Times


"[It is an] essential, unalterable right in nature, engrafted into the British constitution as a fundamental law, and ever held sacred and irrevocable by the subjects within the realm, that what a man has honestly acquired is absolutely his own, which he may freely give, but cannot be taken from him without his consent."
--Samuel Adams, [1768]


"Private, how much rent are you collecting from the visitors living in the bore."

"Attack! Attack! Attack!"

"The best part about being a Marine is that all the sissies were weeded out."

Semper Fi, Mac!
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter

Sgt Grit Newsletter - 30 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51
• Special Assignment
• Out-Of-Body Experience

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Happy Halloween 2014


Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51

Al at dealership with his Z51 Corvette

Z51 Corvette on profile display with Marine Corp Flag

I spent 14 years in the Marine Corps from 1965 to 1979. Now, as the Sr. Vice Commandant of the Marine Corps League (MCL), MGySgt John W. Zaengle Detachment in Glenside, Pa, I wanted my Vette to be "A Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans." Also to use the car at our local car shows to draw attention to the MCL and what we do Marines, their families and veterans.

(Also, had 22 years in Air National Guard.)

Back in April 2013 I put my deposit down on a 2014 Corvette. Of course I was on an allocation list at my dealership in Jenkintown, Pa. I've dealt with them since the 80's and refused to go to another dealership. This was a very special order. Since there was a restriction on the Z51 option, I couldn't even get my order into the system.

The car show season was ramping up, so I contacted an Executive Vice President at General Motors & explained my situation and why I was trying to get the car. The Executive Vice President's office, the Zone Manager, and my dealership all worked together. Everyone was extremely professional and a pleasure to work with. They constantly kept me updated on the progress of my order.

I was able to get the car ordered and delivered in about 6-8 weeks. With all the options I requested, including the Z51 option and the override for the interior color.

The Corvette "Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans" is a special color combination:

1. Laguna Blue, for the Marine Corps dress blue uniform.
2. With dual Crystal Red racing stripes, for the Red Blood stripes that are down each side of the dress blues trousers.
3. Red Interior is to honor those Marines that have shed their blood in defense of our country.

At every show or on the road, people, young and old are taken back by the beauty of the car. It has proven to be the perfect tribute to our Marines.

As of a couple days ago I found that this car is one of 31 - Z51 optioned 2014 Corvettes with dual Crystal Red racing stripes. I'm waiting for the National Corvette Museum to let me know if this is the only one in the Laguna Blue with dual Crystal Red racing stripes & Red/Black Interior color combination. I have to call them back next week to see if this a 1 of 1 car.

I've included a some pictures for you.

Semper Fi!
Al DePue
Marine Corps League
Sr. Vice Commandant
MGySgt. John W. Zaengle Detachment


Racetrack

Sgt. Grit,

When I was in boot Platoon 370 at San Diego (65), one of the Staff DIs was Sgt. McGee. He was crabby most of the time, but displayed a tremendous sense of humor, always at our expense, of course.

He would barely whisper "Get on the road" out of his office door. Someone in the first billet would hear the order and frantically yell it down the line. Since we stumbled into formation in cluster f-ck fashion, he'd punish us with a "Get in the billets" followed immediately by "Get your footlockers and get on the road." Then, "Get in the billets, get on the road, get in the billets, get on the road, girls we're gonna play "racetrack." "Racetrack" entailed gathering a squad of recruits with footlockers into one of those squares of ice plants on either side of the entrances to each billet. We all had busted knuckles, but I can't help but chuckle to myself when I think of how foolish we must have looked. Truth is, that's my kind of humor and "racetrack" is one of my fondest Marine memories.

Semper Fi,
James M. Robinson
SSgt. USMC
1965-1969
Minneapolis


Vietnam Ribbon Cover/Hat


Special Assignment

I was stationed with Mike Company, 3rd Bn, 9th Marines at Camp Sukiran, Okinawa (not Okinawa, Japan) in 1958. Our Staff NCO's had single rooms in the barracks.

One night, one of our Sgts (E-4) had a little too much to drink out in the ville. Upon his return to his squad bay on the second deck in the barracks, he had to use the head. So, he enters the head, and makes use of the urinal. Unfortunately, the Company Gunny's room was right next door to the head and he had gone in the wrong door. The "urinal" turned out to be the Gunny's blanket folded over a radiator. Next morning, in company formation, the Gunny calls out "Sgt Matt-----, front and center. Seems like he had a special assignment for him.

Capt Art Kidd
USMC Ret
1957-1977


Marine Football Program

On the Marine Football Program story (Jim Grimes), I recognized one of the names immediately.

Jim Weatherall, who played ball here locally in White Deer, TX, was the Outland Trophy winner in 1951 at Oklahoma, and went on to play a number of years in the NFL with Detroit, Philly, and the Redskins. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Given the size (and obviously the conditioning, being Marines) of these men in that era, these must have been some pretty darn good football teams.

Dr J B Boren
Amarillo, TX​


Tie-Ties

Here's your challenge for the day!

At Parris Island in 1959 we held a laundry day about once a week... Go to the wash rack behind our barracks and be equipped with the following gear: galvanized bucket, scrub brush, soap bar, and tie-ties.

Tie-ties were used to attach cleaned items to the overhead drying lines (not like the clothes pins that mother used). After an informal search for them they seem to be an item only used at P I and anyone after us Old Corps haven't even heard of such a thing (Do recruits now have commercial laundry services, or electric washing machines, or what?).

​Thanks
MGBGYRENE


Marines STAND

Recruits at MCRD San Diego Battalion Commander Inspection

This image was posted last week on the Sgt Grit Facebook page. The image displays recruits at MCRD San Diego standing at parade rest during a Battalion Commander's inspection. The text on the image reads "MARINES STAND... Serve with, Tactfulness, Accountability, Nobility, and Discipline."

Here are some of the comments left by fans about this post:


Tommy Hicks - M16 they will never feel what the recoil of a M14 feels like.


Daniel Grgurich - I love the 14, what better weapon to take out your enemies at 800 yards.


Beverly Hoyt Holmes - guy in second rank has his knees locked :)


Kenneth Sr Scruggs - Only wore my barracks cover twice,the rest of my tour,I wore the p-ss cover.


Loren Petty Not - so sure about the tact. I have known many tactless Marines, and am probably one of them.


Raymond M. Muro - I am a U.S. Marine, I am the measure against which all others fall short.


View more comments about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


Powder Coated Stainless Steel Lockback Folding Knife


I Knew I Was An SOB

I remember Boot Camp, but I don't remember being beaten, but I do remember Marching until I thought I would die, I remember marching one night after midnight, carrying my bucket full of sand until I thought my arm would fall off. But I wasn't going to give up. I was only 17 years old and when I graduated from Boot Camp, the DI came to me and said; "I didn't think you would make it, you were young, dumb and stupid to boot. I still don't think you will make it!"

All this gave me incentive and I made it but I busted my asz to do it. When I received my emblems I was the proudest SOB in the world (I knew I was an SOB because I was called that so many times in the past few weeks). After further training I finally was sent overseas and I couldn't wait to go into battle. Everyone thought I looked too young and I was given every Sh-t job until finally somehow I slipped through the knot hole and ended up on a ship, an APA. Then somehow me and three other guys had our records lost and no one knew what to do with us.

Finally a smart Clerk/typist or 1st Sgt. knew what to do and got us going and I ended up on Guam on the day it was secured, August 30th, 1944. Instead of fighting I worked my Butt Off loading and unloading supplies, the only enemy I met or saw were Dead and there must have been at least three enemy captured and behind barbed wire clad only in loin cloth's. When I said three I meant three, thats all I saw. I think because I was so small (5'6") and young looking, I went from pillar to post with three other guys.

I ended up on an APA during the Okinawa Invasion, standing on board the ship looking through a Telescope (some sailor had mounted on the deck) I kept a desire for me to go ashore and do my share. Then one day I heard some one calling out and somebody crying and I ran to see what it was.

Japanese civilians were jumping off a cliff, I must have been nineteen years old by this time and could only hope I would soon go ashore. But it wasn't to be. Later when I looked at my new record book I noticed I had participated in the Campaign for Okinawa Junto and the Campaign of the Marianas Island, some old Marine said to me; "What difference does it make, YOU were THERE".

I went back to Pearl Harbor on the APA and ended up in a Guard Detachment. The War ended and because I was loading and unloading supplies, so when I was given a new Record Book I was given a Supply Spec Number (What the MOS was called then), Supply and Administration Spec Numbers were froze and couldn't return to the US until all the 745's (Old rifleman Spec Number) and even the 521's (Basic Marine) had gone home. I finally got home on 10 March 1946, almost six months after the War was over.

I got out and went Home expecting a World Welcoming me home with open arms and a GREAT Job. That wasn't to be either because too many Veterans were already Home and the Job Market was crammed with World War II Vet's, so I joined the 52/20 Club. Congress had passed a law allowing Veterans to Recieve $20.00 a week for 52 weeks unless they got you a job (AND you had to make all appointments the Employment Office Made for you).

H-ll, I had more fun in the Corps and went to the Recruiting Station and asked; "Will you take Veterans?" "H-ll Yes" he said, so I took the Oath and climbed back into Uniform, This time to stay, or so I thought!

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


I Had The Dubious Pleasure

Sgt. Grit,

Allow me, please, to reply to two recent letters in your October 23, 2014 newsletter.

To: Henry ("Hank") Nocella

Only those who have received a less than honorable discharge are "former Marines". You are, and always will be, a Marine - period. You are now wearing a different uniform. That uniform may be a suit and tie. It could also be blue with a badge on the shirt. The uniforms Marines wear are as many and as varied as the men and women who wear them. I'm honored to count myself as one of your Marine brothers.

To: Gary Harlan

I would first like to apologize if I offended you by "implying" that Marines leave or left the Marine Corps because of "peer pressure". I didn't mean to "imply" anything other than the fact that "peer pressure" is a powerful force, back then as well as today. There are many (too numerous to mention) reasons why Marines choose to leave active duty. "Peer pressure" is but one. When we were young, all of us made decisions that later in life we might wish we had made differently. We were young, immature, and sometimes foolish. Frequently, we were placed in unfamiliar surroundings that were dangerous, life threatening. We adjusted to being Marines (a different way of life) in a variety of ways. Many simply decided that the Marine way of life wasn't for them as a career. I don't believe there is a WRONG reason for not making the Marine Corps a career. Every Marine must do what they believe is best for them. The length of time a Marine stays in the Marine Corps, their MOS, or their duty station is absolutely immaterial. What's material is the fact that we are Marine brothers, today, tomorrow, and forever. We all contributed what we could to the accomplishment of the mission. I was also just reflecting on what life as a Marine was like back then.

I had the dubious pleasure of serving 44 months in Vietnam. My first operation was Hastings with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. I was with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines in Hue City and the Tet Offensive in 1968. Captain Ronald Christmas was our Company Commander. He is a retired Lt/Gen and quite instrumental in building the Marine Corps Museum. There were other operations sprinkled through those many months. Many Marines who had no intention of making the Marine Corps a career put their lives on the line for me and other Marines. The hero's names are on the wall in Washington, DC. I'm proud and honored to have served with men of that caliber. Whether a Marine intended to make the Marine Corps a career never made any difference to me. Marines, like you, who didn't make the Marine Corps a career did no less than those of us who chose to make it a career. We who wear the emblem earned it and wear it proudly regardless of where we served or how long we served.

Semper Fi
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Out-Of-Body Experience

Dear Sgt Grit,

I've been reading about some of the troubles some Marines received at boot camp when they got letters with initials written on the backs (SWAK, etc.).

My experience was slightly different.

My older brother was in the Marines eight years before me. When I first got to Parris Island, we recruits were told we were not to receive any mail until further notice and to write and tell everyone "No mail" yet. About the fifth day on the island most of the recruits saw a package on the DI's table at day's end, and after all the remarks that senior drill instructor GySgt Delkowski had to say, he suddenly held up the package and called MY name to come front and center. He asked me if I was expecting any contraband. "Sir, No Sir" I answered. He then asked if I recognized the name and address of the sendee and shoved the package about 2 inches in front of my face. Crossed eyed, I recognized my older brothers writing and wanted to crawl into a hole, because I knew this was not going to end well for me. I said as much as I could in as short a time as possible that it was my older brother... he was in the Marines in the early 50's... he hated me... he's home laughing at me right now... please throw the package away. Other stuff, too, but I can't remember it all now. He then told me to open the package right where I was and show him what's inside. I could see that it was from a quality candy maker in our area, and was sweating about what was going to happen to me.

When I showed him what was in the package he said "What are you going to do with the contents, maggot?" I said pass it around the squad bay (hoping that I wouldn't have to eat the entire contents myself). He said "My maggots don't eat pogy bait, do they maggots?" Everyone yelled louder than anything I had ever heard before, "Sir, No Sir." He says "Well, pass it around the squad bay sh-t head." After I made a trip around the port and starboard sides of the squad bay I returned with the package as full as when I started. I dreaded what I thought was going to happen next, two pounds of chocolate candy crammed down my throat, asphyxiation, death, not becoming a Marine after all.

"Seeing as this is the first time this has happened, I'll keep the package as a reminder to not receive mail until I say you t-rds can receive mail, is that clear people?" he said. "Sir Yes Sir" everyone but me answered. I was having an out-of-body experience about then and it took a few seconds for the words to sink in. When I refocused my eyes he was saying "Dismissed". I stepped back, about faced, and ran faster than I ever ran before to my bunk in case he changed his mind.

Two days later somebody else wasn't so lucky when he had to eat a box of Oreos with Tide laundry detergent poured on them. Didn't take long for the upchucking to start.

By the way, I thanked my brother for sending the package of candy when he did, and he was dumbstruck! I didn't tell him I never had to eat them and I'm sure the DI's had a good time with them.

Got another boot camp story to tell, but it'll be for another time.

L/Cpl Rich Townsend
189xxxx


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #4)

I did not know that my parents had returned to the area and I was shocked to learn that they had purchased The Hemlocks. They had passed that property hundreds - maybe thousands - of times and would often comment about what a lovely place it was. I don't think they ever dreamed of someday owning it. But I am sure they had never really expected to get $464,088 for our farm either. I did not know what they had paid for The Hemlocks but Mr.'B' said it was 'an all cash transaction' and I was sure this property cost MUCH LESS than that. I could not reach my parents by phone and it was almost 2100. I told the 'Bs' that I would go over there in the morning. Mrs.'B' said "You look tired. You won't have to sleep on the sofa tonight. You can go up and sleep in Mary's bed. I am sorry that she will not be joining you - but when you get up there you will think she is there, too. Her room is permeated with the odor of her Prince Matchabelli perfume." And it sure was! This just made me miss her all the more. I slept like a log until my usual wake up time - 0500. I did not wish to disturb anyone so I just laid there and thought about going over to The Hemlocks and seeing my parents for the first time in over a year.

When I heard the 'Bs' going downstairs I got up and took my usual quick shower and got dressed. When I went downstairs Mrs.'B' asked if I would like some breakfast. I said "I'll pass again. I am sure my mother will insist on my having breakfast with them - even if I have stuffed myself here." I told the 'Bs' that I would see them again later in the day and headed over to The Hemlocks. I was sure that my parents and I had a great deal to tell each other. This trip took about 15 minutes or so. I pulled into the long, circular driveway in front of their new home - right up behind my Dad's Rocket Oldsmobile '98'. I sat there a moment and looked at this house. It must have been 60 feet long and 24 feet deep (What I could see at that time. I later learned that the middle third was about 10 or 12 feet deeper.) It was three stories high. I walked to the front door and used the large brass knocker to let them know they had a visitor. My Mom answered and my Dad was only a few steps behind her. We hugged and kissed. My Mom said "I knew you were in the area. We had been here only one day when the mail carrier delivered our first letter. He said he wasn't sure if it was for the Cecils or the new owners. It was the smallest letter I have ever seen in the U.S. Mail. It was for you. I do not know who it is from. It is postmarked from Washington, D.C. and smells like it was dipped in perfume." I knew who it was from. Mom handed it to me. The letter was only about one inch bigger in each direction than a business card. It was addressed to 'Sgt. H. T. Freas, USMC, The Hemlocks, Mt. Laurel Road, Moorestown, N.J.' I slipped it into my pocket. Mom said "Aren't you going to open it?" I said "I'll open it later." She looked a bit puzzled about this.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Smedley D. Butler's Signature

There are probably many more versions of the Marines' Hymn than most can count.

Circa 1963 a few miles West of Lawrence, Kansas. I met someone who I later found out was a Marine. We helped him and his wife escape from a tornado which appeared to be headed towards their house. It was less than 1/4 mile away when we went high port and got away. It missed their house by 100 yds. We got back to his house and found out he was a Marine too. He had participate in the second campaign of Nicaragua. He said when he got discharged from the Marines, it was the day Smedley D. Butler retired. After Gen Butler signed his discharge papers they walked out of headquarters building together. He dug out his discharge paper and there was Smedley D. Butler's signature.

He also dug out copies of the words for the Marine Corps Hymn that lamented, and described, and cussed Nicaragua. There were quite a few versus. Wish I could remember the words.

It never stops amazing me the types of stories you can hear from old Marines if you just take the time to sit a listen. I've met and talked to two Marines that participated in one of the Chinese boxer rebellions and of course this Nicaragua Marine. Most memorable one to me was one that survived the Bataan(sp) Death March.

They gave me much to live up to.

(Hoogie) Gysgt/Capt USMC (ret)
1960-1980


Apprentices Of War: Memoir Of A Marine Grunt

Apprentice of War Book Cover

Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt is a book by Gary Tornes, who served as a United States Marine during the Vietnam War. He tells a vivid and memorable account of military life and the struggles of the foot Marine in Viet Nam. His story illustrates the timeless tragedy of combat that faced the American Marine of that generation. It reveals an emotional and compelling side to what a grunt's life was like on a daily basis in the jungles of Nam. And while Gary takes his readers into the combat zone of that particular war, and tells how the average Marine tried to survive the bloody and brutal challenges in southeast Asia, it's a story that any Marine from any conflict can relate to. The power packed, in-depth, detailed action of Apprentices of War will give you an insight into what he and his fellow Marines encountered and makes Gary's book hard to put down.

Get your hardback copy today at: Apprentices of War: Memoir of a Marine Grunt.


Then Armageddon Started

Six of us from NE Okla (Miami) joined on the 1st of Aug 1953, bussed to KC to catch a train to MCRD San Diego. We got there fairly late and rode cattle cars to the Depot. We were taken to the north side of Grinder, one of the old buildings facing it and we were put on the top floor of very large room with a total of about 100 newbies. There was a flat roof off the front of the room and we all went outside to observe our new world. A DI walking in arcade under us heard the noise and stepped out in the assumed the pose... hands on hips, sneer on mouth. After a 6-minute azs chewing, he advised us to get our stupid civilian Aszzes inside... Then Armageddon started... Supposedly some guy with a defective brain gave him the middle finger salute and then the fun began.

Before we got inside, he was upstairs and had stopped on the first floor and had gotten 3 or 4 other DI's... (assistants I suppose)... briefed them on the situation and everyone was ready... Unfortunately the guy who (reportedly) gave him the salute was wearing a blue shirt, as was I and quite a few others. Of course we got special attention... I was raised with Yes Sir and Yes Mam but some of these guys weren't and they seemed too dumb to understand that, that was required...

After about 30 minutes (seemed like hours) we were told to get into the bunks and do nothing but breathe till morning... I have no idea if this was a staged production or not but it worked...

As with everyone else in the room I wondered as I tried to go to sleep, what the h-ll; have I gotten into... but we soon found out...

Sgt Don Wackerly
1953-1956


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #5)

I had stepped inside. It seemed like I had walked into a museum. The ceilings were about 12 feet high. Seeing my Mom & Dad for the first time in over a year was a pleasure. Mom said "I want to show you around - but I want to get you some breakfast first. What can I fix for you?" I replied "ANYTHING. I have not eaten since lunch yesterday at the Midway." That made her day. She started to work on one of her huge breakfasts. I sat at the very large marble top table that she had acquired when we bought the farm in 1939. I admired the place. It was HUGE, a quite typical 'country kitchen' - about 20 feet square - but all of the kitchen appliances were modern. She fixed my usual half dozen FRESH eggs - sunny side up, scrapple, bacon, corn meal mush and my quart of milk. (I mentioned FRESH eggs because the USMC was still using cold storage eggs purchased for WWII).

Mom & Dad were anxious to show me around. The 'Living Room' and 'Sitting Room' were each about 20 by 24 ft. We went upstairs. The ceilings on the 2nd floor - with four bedrooms and two baths - were 'only' about 10 feet tall - and those on the 3rd floor with another four bedrooms and two baths were the usual 8 feet. There was an attic, too, but I did not go up there. Mrs. Cecil had left a lot of antique furniture that she had no room for in her new home. Mom loved these but had not yet decided where she would put them - and she might be selling some of them. Then we went outside to see the barn and other outbuildings. The nearest building was about the size of a standard poultry house, about 22x26 ft. It was fully enclosed with a big lock on the doors. Then there were four sheds, about 26 ft. deep, with open fronts. The total width of the four was about 100 ft. They were empty. The machinery that had at one time been stored in them was long gone. And then we were at the barn - the biggest barn I had ever seen. We went inside. It had milking stalls for 100 cows and four birthing pens. And of course an enclosed milkhouse over in one corner. I climbed the ladder to look into the haymow. It was huge and reminded me of an airplane hanger. It was empty. (If you had no cows you needed no hay) I climbed down and went over to look into the milkhouse. Then we walked towards the house. We looked at all the beautiful shrubbery and flowers that Mrs. Cecil had planted. My Dad, a born gardener, really liked these.

We walked towards the front of the house. Dad wanted to see my new Buick. He liked it. He asked "What happened to your Hudson?" I replied "I'll tell you the whole sordid story when we get back into the house. How many miles do you have on your Olds?" He said "It's just about to go over 20,000 miles." (And that was in just over a year while on one vacation around the United States) We went inside the house and sat down in the living room. I said "Now that you are sitting down, I will tell you about the demise of the Hudson. I do not know where you were on the 2nd Sunday in April, but you came within a gnats whisker of losing your youngest son."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


Taps

Whitehall, N.Y. – Joseph J."Coach" Marcino, Jr., 91, of Whitehall, died Monday, October 20, 2014 at Glens Falls Hospital surrounded by his loving family by his side following a brief illness.

He was born on May 25, 1923 in Whitehall, N.Y. the son of Joseph and Angela (Bagnacelli) Marcino. Joseph was a member of the American Legion Post #83 of Whitehall. He was also a member of Our Lady of Hope Roman Catholic Church of Whitehall. Joseph was a graduate of Whitehall High School. He then enlisted into the United States Marines Corps serving in WW II, achieving the rank of Sergeant. While serving with Company A, Fifth Tank Battalion, Fifth Marine Division on Volcano Islands on Iwo Jima on March 18, 1945, his tank became disabled forward of the enemy lines. Under heavy enemy fire, he and his crew dismounted the tank and made repairs enabling them to continue forward on their mission. For his devotion and courage, he was awarded the Bronze Star.


Short Rounds

In response to Sgt O:

In 2012 I was at a reunion of 1/9 in San Diego and we attended a graduation while there, and there were a few recruits that were graduating as not only E-2 but some E-3's.

GySgt Larry Schafer, 214xxxx
MCRDSD, platoon 361, Aug '65
Co B, 2ndAmTracBn, Camp Lejeune Jan66-Sep66
A, Co, 1/9 Oct66-Feb67 RVN
CAP-P, Feb67-Oct67 RVN
I&I, Pasadena, Calif., Nov67-Aug69


Hi Sgt.,

We all know the tradition of who gets the first and second piece of our birthday cake. I have a great idea on who should get the third piece of cake, etc. Any Marine who was born on November 10th. starting with the oldest.

Once And Always... Semper Fi!

Brian Stack
P.S. By the way I was born on November 10, 1941 :)


Grimes, get your Dod-gamned, hucking fands out of your pockets! Give me ALL of the squat thrusts in the known universe Grimes!

Grimes with Marine Vets that he went to boot camp with


To "Gy Mac" about the poser: do what I did with one, retire then slap him upside the head and call him a loser. To those arguing about rank leaving boot: Anthony "Squid" Bovenvize left MCRDPICS in 1969 as an E-4, former Navy Corpsman.

Peter Dahlstrom


Gunny McMahon, the lyrics 'Admiration of the Nation' were replaced with 'First to Fight for Right and Freedom' around 1929/1930.

GySgt. P. Santiago
1946-1968


Sgt. Grit,

My suggestion to GySgt Mac. Gunny, don't waste your time and effort. However, if you insist on confronting the poser, then do it calmly and deliberately. And do it without getting physical or loud. I'll bet most of the other employees are well aware that he's lying. I'll also bet that they have little or no respect for the poser. I admire you for wanting to defend our Marine Corps and all Marines against posers whose lies make us all cringe. But he just isn't worth it, now or ever. Semper Fi - Devil Dog - Good Luck.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Here's a 55-year old quickie:

Drill on the P I grinder in 100-degree heat, our Senior D I gave us an at-ease break for the canteen and salt pills.

At the same time he dropped his trousers to square away and tuck in his shirt. Much to the whole platoon's surprise we saw that his bright and white skivvies were decorated with red hearts. (And we realized that this "monster" had a life off the drill field and was human after all!)

​MGBGYRENE


Thanks, for best coffee cup in universe,oohra!

Scott

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Quotes

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive."
--C.S. Lewis


"Freedom is not free, but the U.S. Marine Corps will pay most of your share."
--Ned Dolan


"[T]he crisis is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition, that can be heaped upon us, till custom and use shall make us as tame and abject slaves."
--George Washington (1774)


"A Marine is a Marine. I set that policy two weeks ago - there's no such thing as a former Marine. You're a Marine, just in a different uniform and you're in a different phase of your life. But you'll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico. There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps


"Life without liberty is like a body without spirit."
--Kahlil Gibran


"An honest man can feel no pleasure in the exercise of power over his fellow citizens."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1813


"What is the difference between a fairy tale and a sea story? One starts out once upon a time and the other starts out hey man this is no BULLSH-T."

"I'm so short I'm sleeping in a match box using a rifle patch for a blanket."

"Bends and mothers until you change the rotation of the earth!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 30 OCT 2014

In this issue:
• Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51
• Special Assignment
• Out-Of-Body Experience

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Tribute 2014 Corvette Stingray Z51

I spent 14 years in the Marine Corps from 1965 to 1979. Now, as the Sr. Vice Commandant of the Marine Corps League (MCL), MGySgt John W. Zaengle Detachment in Glenside, Pa, I wanted my Vette to be "A Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans." Also to use the car at our local car shows to draw attention to the MCL and what we do Marines, their families and veterans.

(Also, had 22 years in Air National Guard.)

Back in April 2013 I put my deposit down on a 2014 Corvette. Of course I was on an allocation list at my dealership in Jenkintown, Pa. I've dealt with them since the 80's and refused to go to another dealership. This was a very special order. Since there was a restriction on the Z51 option, I couldn't even get my order into the system.

The car show season was ramping up, so I contacted an Executive Vice President at General Motors & explained my situation and why I was trying to get the car. The Executive Vice President's office, the Zone Manager, and my dealership all worked together. Everyone was extremely professional and a pleasure to work with. They constantly kept me updated on the progress of my order.

I was able to get the car ordered and delivered in about 6-8 weeks. With all the options I requested, including the Z51 option and the override for the interior color.

The Corvette "Tribute To Our Marine Corps Veterans" is a special color combination:

1. Laguna Blue, for the Marine Corps dress blue uniform.
2. With dual Crystal Red racing stripes, for the Red Blood stripes that are down each side of the dress blues trousers.
3. Red Interior is to honor those Marines that have shed their blood in defense of our country.

At every show or on the road, people, young and old are taken back by the beauty of the car. It has proven to be the perfect tribute to our Marines.

As of a couple days ago I found that this car is one of 31 - Z51 optioned 2014 Corvettes with dual Crystal Red racing stripes. I'm waiting for the National Corvette Museum to let me know if this is the only one in the Laguna Blue with dual Crystal Red racing stripes & Red/Black Interior color combination. I have to call them back next week to see if this a 1 of 1 car.

I've included a some pictures for you.

Semper Fi!
Al DePue
Marine Corps League
Sr. Vice Commandant
MGySgt. John W. Zaengle Detachment


Racetrack

Sgt. Grit,

When I was in boot Platoon 370 at San Diego (65), one of the Staff DIs was Sgt. McGee. He was crabby most of the time, but displayed a tremendous sense of humor, always at our expense, of course.

He would barely whisper "Get on the road" out of his office door. Someone in the first billet would hear the order and frantically yell it down the line. Since we stumbled into formation in cluster f-ck fashion, he'd punish us with a "Get in the billets" followed immediately by "Get your footlockers and get on the road." Then, "Get in the billets, get on the road, get in the billets, get on the road, girls we're gonna play "racetrack." "Racetrack" entailed gathering a squad of recruits with footlockers into one of those squares of ice plants on either side of the entrances to each billet. We all had busted knuckles, but I can't help but chuckle to myself when I think of how foolish we must have looked. Truth is, that's my kind of humor and "racetrack" is one of my fondest Marine memories.

Semper Fi,
James M. Robinson
SSgt. USMC
1965-1969
Minneapolis


Special Assignment

I was stationed with Mike Company, 3rd Bn, 9th Marines at Camp Sukiran, Okinawa (not Okinawa, Japan) in 1958. Our Staff NCO's had single rooms in the barracks.

One night, one of our Sgts (E-4) had a little too much to drink out in the ville. Upon his return to his squad bay on the second deck in the barracks, he had to use the head. So, he enters the head, and makes use of the urinal. Unfortunately, the Company Gunny's room was right next door to the head and he had gone in the wrong door. The "urinal" turned out to be the Gunny's blanket folded over a radiator. Next morning, in company formation, the Gunny calls out "Sgt Matt-----, front and center. Seems like he had a special assignment for him.

Capt Art Kidd
USMC Ret
1957-1977


Marine Football Program

On the Marine Football Program story (Jim Grimes), I recognized one of the names immediately.

Jim Weatherall, who played ball here locally in White Deer, TX, was the Outland Trophy winner in 1951 at Oklahoma, and went on to play a number of years in the NFL with Detroit, Philly, and the Redskins. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Given the size (and obviously the conditioning, being Marines) of these men in that era, these must have been some pretty darn good football teams.

Dr J B Boren
Amarillo, TX​


Tie-Ties

Here's your challenge for the day!

At Parris Island in 1959 we held a laundry day about once a week... Go to the wash rack behind our barracks and be equipped with the following gear: galvanized bucket, scrub brush, soap bar, and tie-ties.

Tie-ties were used to attach cleaned items to the overhead drying lines (not like the clothes pins that mother used). After an informal search for them they seem to be an item only used at P I and anyone after us Old Corps haven't even heard of such a thing (Do recruits now have commercial laundry services, or electric washing machines, or what?).

​Thanks
MGBGYRENE


Marines STAND

This image was posted last week on the Sgt Grit Facebook page. The image displays recruits at MCRD San Diego standing at parade rest during a Battalion Commander's inspection. The text on the image reads "MARINES STAND... Serve with, Tactfulness, Accountability, Nobility, and Discipline."

Here are some of the comments left by fans about this post:


Tommy Hicks - M16 they will never feel what the recoil of a M14 feels like.


Daniel Grgurich - I love the 14, what better weapon to take out your enemies at 800 yards.


Beverly Hoyt Holmes - guy in second rank has his knees locked :)


Kenneth Sr Scruggs - Only wore my barracks cover twice,the rest of my tour,I wore the p-ss cover.


Loren Petty Not - so sure about the tact. I have known many tactless Marines, and am probably one of them.


Raymond M. Muro - I am a U.S. Marine, I am the measure against which all others fall short.


View more comments about this post on the Sgt Grit Facebook Page.


I Knew I Was An SOB

I remember Boot Camp, but I don't remember being beaten, but I do remember Marching until I thought I would die, I remember marching one night after midnight, carrying my bucket full of sand until I thought my arm would fall off. But I wasn't going to give up. I was only 17 years old and when I graduated from Boot Camp, the DI came to me and said; "I didn't think you would make it, you were young, dumb and stupid to boot. I still don't think you will make it!"

All this gave me incentive and I made it but I busted my asz to do it. When I received my emblems I was the proudest SOB in the world (I knew I was an SOB because I was called that so many times in the past few weeks). After further training I finally was sent overseas and I couldn't wait to go into battle. Everyone thought I looked too young and I was given every Sh-t job until finally somehow I slipped through the knot hole and ended up on a ship, an APA. Then somehow me and three other guys had our records lost and no one knew what to do with us.

Finally a smart Clerk/typist or 1st Sgt. knew what to do and got us going and I ended up on Guam on the day it was secured, August 30th, 1944. Instead of fighting I worked my Butt Off loading and unloading supplies, the only enemy I met or saw were Dead and there must have been at least three enemy captured and behind barbed wire clad only in loin cloth's. When I said three I meant three, thats all I saw. I think because I was so small (5'6") and young looking, I went from pillar to post with three other guys.

I ended up on an APA during the Okinawa Invasion, standing on board the ship looking through a Telescope (some sailor had mounted on the deck) I kept a desire for me to go ashore and do my share. Then one day I heard some one calling out and somebody crying and I ran to see what it was.

Japanese civilians were jumping off a cliff, I must have been nineteen years old by this time and could only hope I would soon go ashore. But it wasn't to be. Later when I looked at my new record book I noticed I had participated in the Campaign for Okinawa Junto and the Campaign of the Marianas Island, some old Marine said to me; "What difference does it make, YOU were THERE".

I went back to Pearl Harbor on the APA and ended up in a Guard Detachment. The War ended and because I was loading and unloading supplies, so when I was given a new Record Book I was given a Supply Spec Number (What the MOS was called then), Supply and Administration Spec Numbers were froze and couldn't return to the US until all the 745's (Old rifleman Spec Number) and even the 521's (Basic Marine) had gone home. I finally got home on 10 March 1946, almost six months after the War was over.

I got out and went Home expecting a World Welcoming me home with open arms and a GREAT Job. That wasn't to be either because too many Veterans were already Home and the Job Market was crammed with World War II Vet's, so I joined the 52/20 Club. Congress had passed a law allowing Veterans to Recieve $20.00 a week for 52 weeks unless they got you a job (AND you had to make all appointments the Employment Office Made for you).

H-ll, I had more fun in the Corps and went to the Recruiting Station and asked; "Will you take Veterans?" "H-ll Yes" he said, so I took the Oath and climbed back into Uniform, This time to stay, or so I thought!

GySgt. F. L. Rousseau, USMC Retired


I Had The Dubious Pleasure

Sgt. Grit,

Allow me, please, to reply to two recent letters in your October 23, 2014 newsletter.

To: Henry ("Hank") Nocella

Only those who have received a less than honorable discharge are "former Marines". You are, and always will be, a Marine - period. You are now wearing a different uniform. That uniform may be a suit and tie. It could also be blue with a badge on the shirt. The uniforms Marines wear are as many and as varied as the men and women who wear them. I'm honored to count myself as one of your Marine brothers.

To: Gary Harlan

I would first like to apologize if I offended you by "implying" that Marines leave or left the Marine Corps because of "peer pressure". I didn't mean to "imply" anything other than the fact that "peer pressure" is a powerful force, back then as well as today. There are many (too numerous to mention) reasons why Marines choose to leave active duty. "Peer pressure" is but one. When we were young, all of us made decisions that later in life we might wish we had made differently. We were young, immature, and sometimes foolish. Frequently, we were placed in unfamiliar surroundings that were dangerous, life threatening. We adjusted to being Marines (a different way of life) in a variety of ways. Many simply decided that the Marine way of life wasn't for them as a career. I don't believe there is a WRONG reason for not making the Marine Corps a career. Every Marine must do what they believe is best for them. The length of time a Marine stays in the Marine Corps, their MOS, or their duty station is absolutely immaterial. What's material is the fact that we are Marine brothers, today, tomorrow, and forever. We all contributed what we could to the accomplishment of the mission. I was also just reflecting on what life as a Marine was like back then.

I had the dubious pleasure of serving 44 months in Vietnam. My first operation was Hastings with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. I was with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines in Hue City and the Tet Offensive in 1968. Captain Ronald Christmas was our Company Commander. He is a retired Lt/Gen and quite instrumental in building the Marine Corps Museum. There were other operations sprinkled through those many months. Many Marines who had no intention of making the Marine Corps a career put their lives on the line for me and other Marines. The hero's names are on the wall in Washington, DC. I'm proud and honored to have served with men of that caliber. Whether a Marine intended to make the Marine Corps a career never made any difference to me. Marines, like you, who didn't make the Marine Corps a career did no less than those of us who chose to make it a career. We who wear the emblem earned it and wear it proudly regardless of where we served or how long we served.

Semper Fi
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Out-Of-Body Experience

Dear Sgt Grit,

I've been reading about some of the troubles some Marines received at boot camp when they got letters with initials written on the backs (SWAK, etc.).

My experience was slightly different.

My older brother was in the Marines eight years before me. When I first got to Parris Island, we recruits were told we were not to receive any mail until further notice and to write and tell everyone "No mail" yet. About the fifth day on the island most of the recruits saw a package on the DI's table at day's end, and after all the remarks that senior drill instructor GySgt Delkowski had to say, he suddenly held up the package and called MY name to come front and center. He asked me if I was expecting any contraband. "Sir, No Sir" I answered. He then asked if I recognized the name and address of the sendee and shoved the package about 2 inches in front of my face. Crossed eyed, I recognized my older brothers writing and wanted to crawl into a hole, because I knew this was not going to end well for me. I said as much as I could in as short a time as possible that it was my older brother... he was in the Marines in the early 50's... he hated me... he's home laughing at me right now... please throw the package away. Other stuff, too, but I can't remember it all now. He then told me to open the package right where I was and show him what's inside. I could see that it was from a quality candy maker in our area, and was sweating about what was going to happen to me.

When I showed him what was in the package he said "What are you going to do with the contents, maggot?" I said pass it around the squad bay (hoping that I wouldn't have to eat the entire contents myself). He said "My maggots don't eat pogy bait, do they maggots?" Everyone yelled louder than anything I had ever heard before, "Sir, No Sir." He says "Well, pass it around the squad bay sh-t head." After I made a trip around the port and starboard sides of the squad bay I returned with the package as full as when I started. I dreaded what I thought was going to happen next, two pounds of chocolate candy crammed down my throat, asphyxiation, death, not becoming a Marine after all.

"Seeing as this is the first time this has happened, I'll keep the package as a reminder to not receive mail until I say you t-rds can receive mail, is that clear people?" he said. "Sir Yes Sir" everyone but me answered. I was having an out-of-body experience about then and it took a few seconds for the words to sink in. When I refocused my eyes he was saying "Dismissed". I stepped back, about faced, and ran faster than I ever ran before to my bunk in case he changed his mind.

Two days later somebody else wasn't so lucky when he had to eat a box of Oreos with Tide laundry detergent poured on them. Didn't take long for the upchucking to start.

By the way, I thanked my brother for sending the package of candy when he did, and he was dumbstruck! I didn't tell him I never had to eat them and I'm sure the DI's had a good time with them.

Got another boot camp story to tell, but it'll be for another time.

L/Cpl Rich Townsend
189xxxx


From the DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #4)

I did not know that my parents had returned to the area and I was shocked to learn that they had purchased The Hemlocks. They had passed that property hundreds - maybe thousands - of times and would often comment about what a lovely place it was. I don't think they ever dreamed of someday owning it. But I am sure they had never really expected to get $464,088 for our farm either. I did not know what they had paid for The Hemlocks but Mr.'B' said it was 'an all cash transaction' and I was sure this property cost MUCH LESS than that. I could not reach my parents by phone and it was almost 2100. I told the 'Bs' that I would go over there in the morning. Mrs.'B' said "You look tired. You won't have to sleep on the sofa tonight. You can go up and sleep in Mary's bed. I am sorry that she will not be joining you - but when you get up there you will think she is there, too. Her room is permeated with the odor of her Prince Matchabelli perfume." And it sure was! This just made me miss her all the more. I slept like a log until my usual wake up time - 0500. I did not wish to disturb anyone so I just laid there and thought about going over to The Hemlocks and seeing my parents for the first time in over a year.

When I heard the 'Bs' going downstairs I got up and took my usual quick shower and got dressed. When I went downstairs Mrs.'B' asked if I would like some breakfast. I said "I'll pass again. I am sure my mother will insist on my having breakfast with them - even if I have stuffed myself here." I told the 'Bs' that I would see them again later in the day and headed over to The Hemlocks. I was sure that my parents and I had a great deal to tell each other. This trip took about 15 minutes or so. I pulled into the long, circular driveway in front of their new home - right up behind my Dad's Rocket Oldsmobile '98'. I sat there a moment and looked at this house. It must have been 60 feet long and 24 feet deep (What I could see at that time. I later learned that the middle third was about 10 or 12 feet deeper.) It was three stories high. I walked to the front door and used the large brass knocker to let them know they had a visitor. My Mom answered and my Dad was only a few steps behind her. We hugged and kissed. My Mom said "I knew you were in the area. We had been here only one day when the mail carrier delivered our first letter. He said he wasn't sure if it was for the Cecils or the new owners. It was the smallest letter I have ever seen in the U.S. Mail. It was for you. I do not know who it is from. It is postmarked from Washington, D.C. and smells like it was dipped in perfume." I knew who it was from. Mom handed it to me. The letter was only about one inch bigger in each direction than a business card. It was addressed to 'Sgt. H. T. Freas, USMC, The Hemlocks, Mt. Laurel Road, Moorestown, N.J.' I slipped it into my pocket. Mom said "Aren't you going to open it?" I said "I'll open it later." She looked a bit puzzled about this.

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas, Sr.


Smedley D. Butler's Signature

There are probably many more versions of the Marines' Hymn than most can count.

Circa 1963 a few miles West of Lawrence, Kansas. I met someone who I later found out was a Marine. We helped him and his wife escape from a tornado which appeared to be headed towards their house. It was less than 1/4 mile away when we went high port and got away. It missed their house by 100 yds. We got back to his house and found out he was a Marine too. He had participate in the second campaign of Nicaragua. He said when he got discharged from the Marines, it was the day Smedley D. Butler retired. After Gen Butler signed his discharge papers they walked out of headquarters building together. He dug out his discharge paper and there was Smedley D. Butler's signature.

He also dug out copies of the words for the Marine Corps Hymn that lamented, and described, and cussed Nicaragua. There were quite a few versus. Wish I could remember the words.

It never stops amazing me the types of stories you can hear from old Marines if you just take the time to sit a listen. I've met and talked to two Marines that participated in one of the Chinese boxer rebellions and of course this Nicaragua Marine. Most memorable one to me was one that survived the Bataan(sp) Death March.

They gave me much to live up to.

(Hoogie) Gysgt/Capt USMC (ret)
1960-1980


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Then Armageddon Started

Six of us from NE Okla (Miami) joined on the 1st of Aug 1953, bussed to KC to catch a train to MCRD San Diego. We got there fairly late and rode cattle cars to the Depot. We were taken to the north side of Grinder, one of the old buildings facing it and we were put on the top floor of very large room with a total of about 100 newbies. There was a flat roof off the front of the room and we all went outside to observe our new world. A DI walking in arcade under us heard the noise and stepped out in the assumed the pose... hands on hips, sneer on mouth. After a 6-minute azs chewing, he advised us to get our stupid civilian Aszzes inside... Then Armageddon started... Supposedly some guy with a defective brain gave him the middle finger salute and then the fun began.

Before we got inside, he was upstairs and had stopped on the first floor and had gotten 3 or 4 other DI's... (assistants I suppose)... briefed them on the situation and everyone was ready... Unfortunately the guy who (reportedly) gave him the salute was wearing a blue shirt, as was I and quite a few others. Of course we got special attention... I was raised with Yes Sir and Yes Mam but some of these guys weren't and they seemed too dumb to understand that, that was required...

After about 30 minutes (seemed like hours) we were told to get into the bunks and do nothing but breathe till morning... I have no idea if this was a staged production or not but it worked...

As with everyone else in the room I wondered as I tried to go to sleep, what the h-ll; have I gotten into... but we soon found out...

Sgt Don Wackerly
1953-1956


From The DISBURSING CHIEF

(Vol #10, #5)

I had stepped inside. It seemed like I had walked into a museum. The ceilings were about 12 feet high. Seeing my Mom & Dad for the first time in over a year was a pleasure. Mom said "I want to show you around - but I want to get you some breakfast first. What can I fix for you?" I replied "ANYTHING. I have not eaten since lunch yesterday at the Midway." That made her day. She started to work on one of her huge breakfasts. I sat at the very large marble top table that she had acquired when we bought the farm in 1939. I admired the place. It was HUGE, a quite typical 'country kitchen' - about 20 feet square - but all of the kitchen appliances were modern. She fixed my usual half dozen FRESH eggs - sunny side up, scrapple, bacon, corn meal mush and my quart of milk. (I mentioned FRESH eggs because the USMC was still using cold storage eggs purchased for WWII).

Mom & Dad were anxious to show me around. The 'Living Room' and 'Sitting Room' were each about 20 by 24 ft. We went upstairs. The ceilings on the 2nd floor - with four bedrooms and two baths - were 'only' about 10 feet tall - and those on the 3rd floor with another four bedrooms and two baths were the usual 8 feet. There was an attic, too, but I did not go up there. Mrs. Cecil had left a lot of antique furniture that she had no room for in her new home. Mom loved these but had not yet decided where she would put them - and she might be selling some of them. Then we went outside to see the barn and other outbuildings. The nearest building was about the size of a standard poultry house, about 22x26 ft. It was fully enclosed with a big lock on the doors. Then there were four sheds, about 26 ft. deep, with open fronts. The total width of the four was about 100 ft. They were empty. The machinery that had at one time been stored in them was long gone. And then we were at the barn - the biggest barn I had ever seen. We went inside. It had milking stalls for 100 cows and four birthing pens. And of course an enclosed milkhouse over in one corner. I climbed the ladder to look into the haymow. It was huge and reminded me of an airplane hanger. It was empty. (If you had no cows you needed no hay) I climbed down and went over to look into the milkhouse. Then we walked towards the house. We looked at all the beautiful shrubbery and flowers that Mrs. Cecil had planted. My Dad, a born gardener, really liked these.

We walked towards the front of the house. Dad wanted to see my new Buick. He liked it. He asked "What happened to your Hudson?" I replied "I'll tell you the whole sordid story when we get back into the house. How many miles do you have on your Olds?" He said "It's just about to go over 20,000 miles." (And that was in just over a year while on one vacation around the United States) We went inside the house and sat down in the living room. I said "Now that you are sitting down, I will tell you about the demise of the Hudson. I do not know where you were on the 2nd Sunday in April, but you came within a gnats whisker of losing your youngest son."

Semper Fi. The old, real old, real, real old (85) Master Gunny.

Harold T. Freas Sr.


Taps

Whitehall, N.Y. – Joseph J."Coach" Marcino, Jr., 91, of Whitehall, died Monday, October 20, 2014 at Glens Falls Hospital surrounded by his loving family by his side following a brief illness.

He was born on May 25, 1923 in Whitehall, N.Y. the son of Joseph and Angela (Bagnacelli) Marcino. Joseph was a member of the American Legion Post #83 of Whitehall. He was also a member of Our Lady of Hope Roman Catholic Church of Whitehall. Joseph was a graduate of Whitehall High School. He then enlisted into the United States Marines Corps serving in WW II, achieving the rank of Sergeant. While serving with Company A, Fifth Tank Battalion, Fifth Marine Division on Volcano Islands on Iwo Jima on March 18, 1945, his tank became disabled forward of the enemy lines. Under heavy enemy fire, he and his crew dismounted the tank and made repairs enabling them to continue forward on their mission. For his devotion and courage, he was awarded the Bronze Star.


Short Rounds

In response to Sgt O:

In 2012 I was at a reunion of 1/9 in San Diego and we attended a graduation while there, and there were a few recruits that were graduating as not only E-2 but some E-3's.

GySgt Larry Schafer, 214xxxx
MCRDSD, platoon 361, Aug '65
Co B, 2ndAmTracBn, Camp Lejeune Jan66-Sep66
A, Co, 1/9 Oct66-Feb67 RVN
CAP-P, Feb67-Oct67 RVN
I&I, Pasadena, Calif., Nov67-Aug69


Hi Sgt.,

We all know the tradition of who gets the first and second piece of our birthday cake. I have a great idea on who should get the third piece of cake, etc. Any Marine who was born on November 10th. starting with the oldest.

Once And Always... Semper Fi!

Brian Stack
P.S. By the way I was born on November 10, 1941 :)


Grimes, get your Dod-gamned, hucking fands out of your pockets! Give me ALL of the squat thrusts in the known universe Grimes!


To "Gy Mac" about the poser: do what I did with one, retire then slap him upside the head and call him a loser. To those arguing about rank leaving boot: Anthony "Squid" Bovenvize left MCRDPICS in 1969 as an E-4, former Navy Corpsman.

Peter Dahlstrom


Gunny McMahon, the lyrics 'Admiration of the Nation' were replaced with 'First to Fight for Right and Freedom' around 1929/1930.

GySgt. P. Santiago
1946-1968


Sgt. Grit,

My suggestion to GySgt Mac. Gunny, don't waste your time and effort. However, if you insist on confronting the poser, then do it calmly and deliberately. And do it without getting physical or loud. I'll bet most of the other employees are well aware that he's lying. I'll also bet that they have little or no respect for the poser. I admire you for wanting to defend our Marine Corps and all Marines against posers whose lies make us all cringe. But he just isn't worth it, now or ever. Semper Fi - Devil Dog - Good Luck.

Semper Fi,
A Former "Hat"
GySgt, USMC, (Ret)


Here's a 55-year old quickie:

Drill on the P I grinder in 100-degree heat, our Senior D I gave us an at-ease break for the canteen and salt pills.

At the same time he dropped his trousers to square away and tuck in his shirt. Much to the whole platoon's surprise we saw that his bright and white skivvies were decorated with red hearts. (And we realized that this "monster" had a life off the drill field and was human after all!)

​MGBGYRENE


Thanks, for best coffee cup in universe,oohra!

Scott

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Quotes

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive."
--C.S. Lewis


"Freedom is not free, but the U.S. Marine Corps will pay most of your share."
--Ned Dolan


"[T]he crisis is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition, that can be heaped upon us, till custom and use shall make us as tame and abject slaves."
--George Washington (1774)


"A Marine is a Marine. I set that policy two weeks ago - there's no such thing as a former Marine. You're a Marine, just in a different uniform and you're in a different phase of your life. But you'll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico. There's no such thing as a former Marine."
--General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps


"Life without liberty is like a body without spirit."
--Kahlil Gibran


"An honest man can feel no pleasure in the exercise of power over his fellow citizens."
--Thomas Jefferson, 1813


"What is the difference between a fairy tale and a sea story? One starts out once upon a time and the other starts out hey man this is no BULLSH-T."

"I'm so short I'm sleeping in a match box using a rifle patch for a blanket."

"Bends and mothers until you change the rotation of the earth!"

Fair winds and following seas.
Sgt Grit

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Sgt Grit Newsletter - 23 OCT 2014

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36th CMC General Joseph F. Dunford

All Hail the 36th Commandant of the Marine Corps! General Joseph F. "Fighting Joe" Dunford.

Read the Commandant's message to all Marines:

Commandant's message to all Marines

Different Versions Of Marines' Hymn

Sgt Grit,

Has there ever been any type of research into how many different versions there are to The Marines' Hymn?

A little background into my request... I returned from Okinawa to San Diego in early June, 1957... married the love of my life in the Base Chapel at MCRDep on 26 June 1957 and had over 56 fantastic years with her, which ended on 25 October 2013; she is waiting for me until I report for guard duty some day.

On 31Dec13, I changed to DISH Network, and one of the features are 70+ channels of Sirius XM satellite radio; one of which is "40s on 4", mostly songs (a lot of tear-jerkers) from the WWII era. You haven't heard anything until you hear a jazz version of The Marine's Hymn by Bob Crosby (Bing's brother) and his "Bob Cats". Another band has the version in question with words, "admiration of the Nation, we're the finest ever seen, and we glory in the title 'United States Marine'", and it goes on to the wording about the Streets of Heaven being guarded by United States Marines.

Semper Fi...
James R. McMahon
GySgt of Marines (1949-1970)