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#MARINE OF THE WEEK // “We had to buckle down. There was no time to dwell.”

#MARINE OF THE WEEK // “We had to buckle down. There was no time to dwell.”

Sgt. Ken Rick
1st Battalion, 7th Marines
Afghanistan, June 22-23, 2012
Award: Silver Star

After the completion of an air assault into an Afghan village, then-Sgt. Ken Rick (now a Staff Sgt.) and his squad were attacked from multiple positions by high volumes of medium machinegun and indirect fire. Rick subjected himself to the enemy fire four times to employ his M4 carbine and M203 grenade launcher accurately while directing his squad’s maneuver. By his leadership, Rick’s squad served the enemy with devastating firepower and forced their immediate withdrawal. Later that day, with complete disregard for his own safety, Rick forfeited cover and ran out of their patrol base, covering 200 meters of open ground to lead a security team and recover a mortally wounded Marine. Though enemy rounds impacted within feet of his position as the security team maneuvered to the patrol base, Rick calmly directed his squad’s fires. He remained outside the patrol base, suppressing the enemy until all of his Marines were safely inside. The following day, Rick again led his squad in countering a complex ambush. The precision fire he employed from his grenade launcher destroyed two enemy fighters and oriented close air support aircraft onto their targets, ultimately leading to the destruction of the enemy. 

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MARINE OF THE WEEK // RAIDER LEADER

MARINE OF THE WEEK // RAIDER LEADER:

Master Sgt. Aaron Torian
2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion
Afghanistan, Jan. 29, 2014
Award: Bronze Star Medal w/ Combat “V”

During a combat operation in Afghanistan, Master Sgt. Torian’s unit came under heavy machine gun and underslung grenade-launcher fire. Maneuvering across open terrain, Torian exposed himself to enemy fire in order to establish better satellite communications and observe the enemy’s maneuvers. He then effectively coordinated multiple rotary-wing close air support missions with rockets, guns, and a hellfire missile. Two weeks later, he was killed in action. “What I admire most about Aaron was his relentless, competitive spirit; unrivaled work capacity and zest for life, family and friends,” said Charlie Goodyear, a long-time friend. “All these things made him an incredible Marine, friend, husband, and father to his family.”

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Master Sgt. Catherine G. Murray, first female Marine to retire from active service, laid to rest

Master Sgt. Catherine G. Murray, the first enlisted female Marine to retire from the Marine Corps, was laid to rest Tuesday in Arlington National Cemetery.

Murray, born in 1917, first served in motor transport during World War II and remained in active service until her retirement in 1962. She said hearing then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1941 radio broadcast announcing the attack on Pearl Harbor was a pivotal moment in her life.

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#MARINE OF THE WEEK // SHOT IN NECK, KEEPS FIGHTING:

#MARINE OF THE WEEK // SHOT IN NECK, KEEPS FIGHTING:

Lance Cpl. Cody Goebel
3rd Battalion, 5th Marines
Sangin, Afghanistan, Nov. 22, 2010
Award: Silver Star

While in Afghanistan’s Helmand province, Lance Cpl. Goebel was manning a security position in the southern Green Zone of Sangin District when he was struck in the neck by enemy small arms fire. Knocked to the ground and severely wounded at his post, he quickly picked himself up, remounted his machine gun, and engaged the enemy’s firing position with full knowledge that his position was critical to his squad’s defense. For seven minutes, he ignored his life threatening wounds and delivered devastating machine gun fire on the enemy’s position, all while refusing medical attention until he was properly relieved. Finally, but only after a fellow squad member had manned his machine gun, Goebel moved 25 meters under his own power and under heavy fire across the observation post’s roof and down a 20-foot ladder to the casualty collection point. Upon reaching the ground, he collapsed due to the loss of blood and had to be carried to a helicopter landing zone for subsequent medical evacuation. His courage, heroism, and dedication to duty after sustaining a life threatening injury resulted in the successful blocking of an enemy attack and six enemy fighters killed. (U.S. Marines photos by Sgt. Timothy Lenzo)

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MARINE CORPS SEARCHES FOR NEW SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM

Giving Marine Commanders the means to communicate beyond line of sight while forward deployed is a critical and necessary capability. A Marine Corps Systems Command-led working group is actively pursuing updates to the Very Small Aperture Terminal Family of Systems, which has been deployed for nearly a decade. The mission: to develop and deliver an updated, cost-effective, reliable solution.

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One Marine killed at School of Infantry, another in custody

One Marine was killed and another taken into custody after a fight broke out at Camp Pendleton’s School of Infantry on Tuesday, according to a Marine official.

The San Diego Union-Tribune reported that the Marine was fatally stabbed.

“An NCIS [Naval Criminal Investigative Service] investigation has been opened, and is currently ongoing,” Marine Capt. Joshua Pena, a spokesman for the Corps’ Virginia-based Training and Education Command, told Marine Corps Times Tuesday.

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IDAHO FALLS FUTURE MARINE SEEKS TO BETTER HIMSELF, INSPIRE COMMUNITY

Born in Fort Washakie, Wyoming, a trouble maker and full of attitude, Devin Nagitsy moved from a reservation to his great grandmothers in Idaho in 2006. Today, he is a Future Marine recruited out of Pocatello, ready to leave for recruit training and earn the title of United States Marine.

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MARINE OF THE WEEK // SELFLESS SACRIFICE:

MARINE OF THE WEEK // SELFLESS SACRIFICE:

Sgt. Rafael Peralta
1st Battalion, 3rd Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7, 1st Marine Division
Fallujah, Iraq, November 15 2004
Award: Navy Cross (Posthumously)

Clearing scores of houses in the previous three days, Sergeant Peralta asked to join an under-strength squad and volunteered to stand post the night of 14 November, allowing fellow Marines more time to rest. The following morning, during search and attack operations, while clearing the seventh house of the day, the point man opened a door to a back room and immediately came under intense, close-range automatic weapons fire from multiple insurgents. The squad returned fire, wounding one insurgent. While attempting to maneuver out of the line of fire, Sergeant Peralta was shot and fell mortally wounded. After the initial exchange of gunfire, the insurgents broke contact, throwing a fragmentation grenade as they fled the building. The grenade came to rest near Sergeant Peralta’s head. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Peralta reached out and pulled the grenade to his body, absorbing the brunt of the blast and shielding fellow Marines only feet away. Sergeant Peralta succumbed to his wounds. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Peralta reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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