Sgt. Grit Community
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Call me Doc

I served as a Navy Corpsman from 1988-1996.  I hever served on a ship or sub but I've repelled out of choppers, dug foxholes, slept in the rain, ate MREs, carried a 16, and driven a Humvee.  The only time I wore blue was in bootcamp. I say Ooh-Rah not Aye-Aye. I only know the begining of "Anchors Away" but can sing "The Halls of Montezuma" in my sleep.  I know all the MARINE jokes and have told them hundreds of times.  I cuss at the stupid crap you do that makes more work for me.  I threaten to loose your shot records if I don't get my way.  I call you grunt and jarhead when I know you prefer Devil Dog or Leather Neck just to push your buttons.  I would crawl through hell to get to you and drag you back. I would give my life for any and everyone of you and can never thank you nor repay you for giving your life for me and my family.  Some call me a sailor or a squid, but my friends call me Doc.

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A Family of Docs

Wanted to just take a moment before I get to damn old and forget to share this.

My grandfather , my father, his brother, my cousin, myself and my son were all Corpsman; all saw combat except thankfuly my son  – How my father and his brother managed to survive the WWII island campaign is beyond me , both had serious wounds and came back for more.

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Corpsmen Quotes

I don't really give a rat's hind end for the blue side of the Navy. I managed seven years without stepping on ship. I wore green the entire time.

Have you thought about doing some other Corpsmen Quotes on shirts? ie: "You just sit right there and nice Doc will poor you a hot cup of Suck it the Hell UP!", or "If your going to be stupid, you gotta be tough". There are plenty of fine Corpsman sayings we tend to have for Marines that either malinger or are just not the sharpest knife in the proverbial drawer.

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“Doc” Sanchez

Hey Sgt. Grit–

For your "Marine Corps BS pages", an entry for your "CORPSMAN" section:

I was working in the Electroenchephalogram (EEG) Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, IL, when the POWs came home from the 'Nam in January 1973. I felt proud to have 'known' them. Like many young hotshot Corpsmen I knew then, I couldn't keep my mouth shut. One day I was called into the Chief Nurse's office and chewed out for something I didn't do. When I was asked for my opinion I gave it, telling her to fornicate herself. She smiled and dismissed me. Next thing I know, Personnel Office called with orders for me: 3rd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, Okinawa. I was sent first to Devil Doc school at Camp Pendleton where I was honored to meet Gunny Allan J. Kellogg, Jr., Medal of Honor recipient for action in March 1970 in the 'Nam. He was our Company Gunny while I learned how to field strip the Colt .45 Model 1911 and the Mattie Mattel M-16 and dig a slit trench and give Morphine Sulfate 16 mg intramuscular and keep Marines alive under fire.

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Mike’s Home

Dear Sgt Grit,
 

While serving as a Corpsman with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines in Vietnam (1969) we got into an altercation near Hill 1154 near LZ Argonne. Some time during that period I souvienered a NVA/Chinese battle dressing. I told my Marines that I carried around 50 battle dressings in my gear for them, this one was for me if I needed it. I wore it on my helmet the rest of my tour and never needed it.

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