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Col. Mike Lowe’s Speech at Quantico

Col. Mike Lowe’s speech at Quantico

Col. Lowe was invited to be a guest speaker at a formal “Dining In” at Basic School at Quantico and who took the time to actually compose a crowd-friendly, entertaining message.

The following are the remarks of Col. Mike Lowe, the Commander of Marine Corps Base Quantico. These remarks are very much to the point and the Colonel held the absolute attention of everyone at the mess. Colonel James M. Lowe
Commander
Marine Corps Base Quantico

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Clinton’s Loathing Letter

Clinton’s Loathing Letter
by Lt. Col. Michael Mark (Reprinted with permission of Military magazine, 2122 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818. A sample copy of Military may be obtained by writing to the above address)

The story on page 6 about Bob Dole as a young man during World War II contrasts dramatically with what is known about Bill Clinton when he was called upon during time of war. Bob Dole served in the infantry with courage and nearly died from wounds received.

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The Fourth Marines in Shanghai, China

THE FOURTH MARINES IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

While Shanghai is rapidly changing with old buildings giving way to new buildings, there are still many places remaining related to the Fourth Marine regiment's long presence in the city from 1927 to 1941. The 1st and 3rd Battalions of the regiment were deployed to Shanghai in 1927 to protect American citizens and property in Shanghai's International Settlement (the "Settlement") on the Puxi or west side of the Huangpu River (then called the Whampoo River). The 2nd Battalion was deployed to Tientsin, China at the same time and redesignated into another regiment. The 2nd Battalion of the Fourth Marines was reactivated in Shanghai on September 18, 1932 in order for the regiment to be at full strength to effectively defend the U.S. defense sector of the Settlement. The 3rd Battalion was deactivated in Shanghai on December 19, 1934.

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Remember Them by Mike Morgan

Sgt Grit,
This Sunday my church will have our annual Memorial Day Service. We Honor those who have fought and died to allow us the right to worship and serve Jesus Christ. Those who have served will be recognized during the service, we have a Color Guard from a local high school ROTC come in. This year we will honor a special Marine who just passed away last week. Cpl. David Miller, he was an Iwo Jima Marine, a Purple Heart Recipient and most importantly a Pastor of 45 years. I sat next to him during our Sunday services and many of opportunity to talk with him. His love for the Corps was only surpassed by his love for Jesus Christ and serving Him. In Honor of his service to our country, I have enclosed something that I wrote to display on our bulletin board at my church. I am no writer, but just wanted our younger generation to remember where their freedom comes form and its cost. It is not directly related to the Marine Corps, but to all of our servicemen and woman. If possible could you pass this on to allow some of the youth of America to understand what freedom cost. Thank you to those who have served and serve.

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I needed to tell you this

I needed to tell you this

Dear Sgt Grit Well it was that time again when I said goodbye to my son, of the few, of the proud. Strangely it was harder this time than the last time. Last time I watched a boy go off to war and this time I saw a man climb onto that bus. The reality of it is that the 3/2 lost 14 brave, courageous men at the last deployment. I started a scholarship here in Tampa, Florida for Lance Corporal Eric W. Herzberg, 20 years old killed by a sniper in Al Anbar Province and a friend of my son’s.

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“In Retrospect” of the Vietnam War

Mr. McNamara’s Other War
Published in the Washington Post, Sunday, April 30, 1995

The bitter controversy unleashed by the publication of former defense secretary Robert S. McNamara’s Vietnam memoir, “In Retrospect,” gives new meaning to the words “McNamara’s war.” Having now slogged our way through the book itself, the outpouring of criticism with which it was met at the moment of publication and some of the relevant history of the time, we conclude the following: In a strange way both Mr. McNamara and those who belabor him for not having either resigned or spoken out at at time when he might have hastened the end of the war are saying the same thing. The critics say he should have done one or the other or both. The author provides a devastating case study of a governmental process, which he did much to create and keep running, that all but guaranteed he wouldn’t. He and the others would instead just keep on improvising, trying one more thing, taking one more step, finding one more reason not to do what both he and his critics now wish he had.

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