Our Marine Brotherhood

Entrance to receiving barracks at MCRD San Diego

Though it’s been thirty years that I retired as a Marine I found my Platoon 3331 year book, secondly it’s been fifty years come September that I as you and counts of thousands after us arrived to challenge our body, mind and spirit and to having it broken down so that we could be taught courage, poise, self-confidence and pride of belonging to the worlds finest by earning the title Marine that no one can take from us. These words written at the side entrance to the Receiving Barracks do represent our fighting spirit as a Team and Our Marine Brotherhood.

Semper Fidelis
RamTwo

39 thoughts on “Our Marine Brotherhood”

    1. Sixty three years for me Brother, and I know your feeling for I also still have that pride that keeps me upright and stalwart, Semper Fi.

        1. Hi Mr. Arends. My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. I would love to speak with anyone, actually, that went through boot camp at SD in the 1950s that may read this comment. Thank you.

      1. Hi Mr. Morris, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

  1. Hey Bro’s its been , 44 yrs for me , since graduation day at Parris Island , and yes I to am as proud as I was that day ,, Semper Fi

  2. It has been 57 years since I went through the portal at Receiving Barracks, and 28 years since I retired. I remain a Marine and will be until they throw dirt in my face, and probably after that.

    1. Hi Mr. StClair, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

        1. Hi Mr. Ennett, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

      1. Hi Mr. Connly, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

  3. A kind of rebirth occurs in Marine Corps boot camp. The overwhelming experience forever alters the mind. The recruit’s entire perception of himself/herself is changed. The thought processes, how one deals with problems and challenges, are entirely different than before. The only experience that exceeds becoming a U.S. Marine is accepting Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour. In 1965, the Marine Corps made me who I am today. In 1962, a Jewish carpenter defined my future in eternity.

  4. I WENT THRU PI IN 1958/1960. I AM STILL JUST AS PROUD NOW AS THEM. THAT TRAINING HAS HELPED PUT ME THRU LIFE ALWAYS WATCH MY 6. STILL WEAR A MARINE COVER WHEN EVER I GO OUT & NICE TO HERE PEOPLE SAY THANKS FOR MY SERVICE. I DO AS WELL TO FELLOW MARINES.WHEN ASKED WHY MARINE’S ARE ON NAVY SHIP’S, I JUST RESPOND THAT THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO DANCE WITH.ALWAYS GET A CHUCKLE EVEN FROM NAVY VETS. SEMPER FI.

  5. I don’t know if there is a Marine alive (and, if so, I haven’t met him) who doesn’t say that his life was changed forever and for the better having graduated boot camp as a Marine. I know mine was in 1964.

  6. Hit paris island/October of1952,64 yrs ago,still remember most everything from that time,still thank the lord for all the experiences,good and bad but mostly being changed from an 18 yr old punk know it alll to a MARINE. SEMPER FI ALL.

  7. 60 Years ago 8Aug56 I first got to PI and have never looked back. It was the learning experience that keeps me going even today. Semper Fi

  8. Following a total loss home fire in 2007, one irreplaceable item, my boot camp platoon red book is missed as much as anything else. I don’t know for sure but it would seem this item may be irreplaceable. Although many treasured items are forever gone, this one item is a recurring irritation and I would advise anyone to digitally store a copy of it, along with other items of importance as everything here is temporary, except our Corps, an indestructible force that made all of us stronger for life’s ups and downs. One amusing story will stay with me ’til the end. As ” honor platoon”, we were assigned to base maintanence instead of mess duty for one of our last weeks.. My fellow maggot and I were to clean certain areas of the staff NCO quarters without much supervision and with the over-hanging warning of brig time for using any of the vending machines. While polishing the brass fire extinguisher in one passageway, I heard coins drop into a coke machine around the corner. Since I hadn’t seen anyone else about, I crept into the wash room where I observed the shadow of my fellow worker, chugging down the fruits of his pogey-baiting soda buy, as fast as humanly possible and without any obsevable pleasure as I sternly said “Come here you f***ing puke ! ” in my best D.I. tone. His red faced sheepish appearance was so damned funny that I was immobilized and rolling on the floor as he pummeled me for taking some number of years off his life and put Leavenworth clearly into his future. We later served in “Nam together in “C Co., 7th M.T. Bn. for extended tours and even kept in touch after we got out for years. Hope Cpl.C.A. Towery enjoys a cool one now and then ( I’m sure he does). , M. Van Zee,Cpl. E-4, (1968) 2168782, platoon 270, M.C.R.D. S.D. Semper Fi . ( You can publish my e-mail address, might get some replies you never know.)

  9. I read a lot here of Marines graduating boot camp in the mid 50’s to the early 60’s along with talk of their DI’s, my Dad was a DI at PI in this time frame, Sgt. Shook, any one recall him? I too was a DI at PI mid 70’s but don’t here many talk of that time era. Would love to hear from anyone from these times. Semper Fi Jarheads!

  10. It has been 58 years since I went in the Marine Corps at the tender age of 17. Started boot camp at San Diego 1 July 1958. Platoon 255. Quonset hut days then. After graduation, went across the grinder to Radio Telegraph Operators school. Our barracks was on the 2nd floor over the arches and off to the left of the flag pole. Spent almost six months there before transfer to 1st Composite Radio Co. at Kaneohe MCAS, Hawaii. Discharged June 1962. Wouldn’t exchange those four years for anything.. Semper fi.

    1. Hi Mr. Powell, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

  11. MCRD 2/1957 I believe My Platoon # was 191-not sure thu .Lost my Platoon book in a fire . would give any thing to have it back. Those 13 weeks change n\m e and my out look on live big time Semper Fi

    1. Hi Mr. Maze, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

  12. Don’t recall my Platoon #. Went through PI almost 66 years ago. Can’t remember the names of all I served with but all the other good and bad memories stay with me. SWMPER FI. And bless them all.

  13. Great comments by all. Would love to hear from any who served with me in Platoon 47, 2nd Recruit Training Bn., Parris Island, SC, April – June 1947. In addition to our Platoon picture I have (that I’m unable to post here), I also have individual pictures of some of fellow recruit Platoon 47 Marines that I’d be glad to share. Here are their names (by their “position” in the Platoon Picture), last name in Capital Letters:
    Top Row: NASH; BLAND, Robert L.; KING, Ivan R.; MC DAID, R.; MC CALLISTER, Paul L.; REDMAN; LIPSYNSKI; SHOTTS; BARNHARDT; HALE; SCHILLING, Felix; JONES, George T. Jr.; HOWARD, Edward J.; MARLIN; EDWARDS J. E.;
    2nd From Top: CHAPMAN, Bill; SHOMAKE, David R.; VAN CLEEF, Donald M.; SAUER; CARLSON; BAGLEY; RAY, Walter E.; WOOD, Arthur W. Jr.; COUSINS, James R.; PURNELL; BASSO; ALLISON, Robert L.; O’BRIEN, Jerry T.; MERNA, Gerald F.; BINGHAM, George P.;
    Middle Row: PETERS, Joseph R.; GARDNER, Howard H.; SCOTT; BEATTY, Richard J.; GILBERT, S.L.; JECHENTAAL; MAC LEOD, Edgar B.; HOFFMAN, Gene; YEOMAN; MC ALLISTER, Paul L.; BALLINGER, Bob; LEWIS; LACINA, J.J.; WARD, Charles R.; MORAN, James;
    2nd From Bottom: PERRY; ROUSH; MEECE; ENGLE, Ed; MC PEEK; WILLIAMS; WEIGLE; LANDRY; PARKER, H. A.; ANGERSTEIN, Otto C.; IPPOLITO, George; MEADOWS, David W. Jr.; BARNHILL, Earnest H.; WEST, Samuel J.; AMMERMAN, Blair T.;
    Bottom Row: LUTTRELL, Thomas H.; EASTIN, Albert C.; RICKABAUGH, William H.; BROWN, J. K.; PETRONZIO, Paul A. (He also has a Nephew who was Colonel Paul A. Petronzio); SGT SCHMID, Paul (DI); SSGT ALBRING, J. (Sr. DI–he was killed at the Chosen Reservoir while serving as a Gunnery Sgt); PVT JENSEN (Jr. DI); WINGROVE, Robert C.; KEENAN, Jim; KYLE, B. H.; OVERY, Robert; THOMPSON, Frederick L.
    Above names provided by Gerald F. Merna, 1stLt USMC Ret., (Mustang-MGySgt; Retired 2Oct68).

  14. It will be 51 years ago this coming September 8th. that I “earned” the title of a United States Marine. I was in “Honor Platoon” 244. Would love to to know any of my fellow Marines that earned that tiltle along with me as well as the whereabouts of my Drill Instructors…Sgt. K. V. Davis, Platoon Commander, Sgt. R.B. Goedert, Drill Insructor and Sgt. J.W. Brasher, Drill Instructor. Any former “hats” out their know of there whereabouts?

  15. Marine Brothers, I am applaud at the comments, feelings posted by all of you. A picture is worth a thousand words for the Pride of being a Marine is in our heart and mind forever. Remember it doesn’t matter if you were an “era” or “veteran” during conflicts, but that you were trained and ready to execute as ordered for you are a Marine. Semper Fi!

  16. It’s been 47 years, Jan through March 1969 since I became a Marine, mcrd San Diego platoon 1008, most challenging experience of my life, but I wouldn’t change a thing, God Bless to all you Devil Dogs, Semper Fi

  17. I put my feet on the yellow footprints at Parris Island in August 1968 and left a Marine in October 1968. Semper Fi – Forever and a day. Jim

  18. There are two “Semper Fi” bumper stickers in the pockets of our car doors. Each time we pass a vehicle displaying a Marine sticker or license plate, we hold up the Semper Fi sticker and honk. We have never failed to receive a return honk, a smile, and/or a thumbs up. Once a Marine, always a Marine! Proud Jarhead

  19. Wow ! What memories. July 2nd, 1953. San Diego. Still as proud now as I was on graduation. Scared to death, but I would do it again in a heart beat. A snot nosed kid who thought he knew everything and thought he could whip the world. Semper Fi, Marines.

    1. Hi Mr. Lefker, My great uncle went through boot camp at MCRD SD in 1951 and was killed in the Korean War. I am trying to learn more about boot camp in the 1950s. I would be so honored to talk with you. My e-mail is rredfer1@gmail.com. Thank you.

  20. 67 years since I went to receiving Barracks in 1949 PLT 36 MCRD San Dioego. Web were in wooden BKS Down by the Back Gate.

  21. We the Marines along side our Family of Veterans are the back bone of our country . I have always believed that if we were invaded we would be the 2nd front , pride in our Corps would see us to victory Ooorah Semper Fidelis.

  22. Platoon 22, 1st Battalion. Feb to May 1955. Drill instructors- Ssg. Massey, Sgt. bowling and Sgt. Stacey. Some things never forgotten. From Former sgt.Joe Cosgriff

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