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Do Your Duty

I was in the fourth or fifth week of boot camp at MCRD in August 1953 when our senior DI called out “private Daly — front and center.” He stacked one locker box on top of the other and had me climb up on them. He then read the following words written on the flap of a letter from my girlfriend Margaret. “Postman, postman do your duty. Rush this letter to my Cutie.” From that day on I was known as Private Cutie at roll call, mail call and any other time the DI addressed me. That name stuck with me until I was transferred to the 3rd MarDiv 12th Marines, in 1954. In my next letter to Margaret, I told her NEVER to write ANYTHING on the outside of the envelope again. She never did ! 

 Another Marine recruit was caught signing his letter to his girlfriend with his nickname, “Bubbles”. So we had a “Private Cutie” and a “Private Bubbles” until graduation. 

 God bless all Marines. Semper Fi! 

 John B. Daly, 1412090 (0844)

1953-1955

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Comments

Norm Decicco - June 10, 2020

At P I, the private next to me received an envelope with a bunch of love comments on it. After he finished a large amount of side straddle hoopies, and returned to his foot locker I told him he better tell his girlfriend not to do that anymore. He said the letter was from his brother, a Marine of course.

J B Sitler Sgt.USMCR 62-68 - June 10, 2020

HANKAWATHA HIBUTT…… Shine made me do it.

Sgt Hisel ’62 to ’68 USMC Reserve - June 10, 2020

Christmas ’62 MCRDSD, an ex Air Force buddy sent a Christmas package addressed to Private Hibutt, Plt 183. Since I was the only one whose last name started with Hi I was known by that name until I became guide.

Jim Barber - June 10, 2020

Where were all you guys with these funny stories when I asked for submissions for my book? “SH*TBIRD! How I Learned to Love the Corps” was a labor of love by and for Marines. It really turned out to be funny and fun to write. Thanks to all you guys who submitted stories. The book is available at http://www.shitbirdbook.com, also at amazon and Barnes and Noble, in Nook and Kindle. Check out email address on back of book for future book II.

Lloyd Dellacort - June 10, 2020

Marine John Daly, I was in platoon 229 at MCRDSD during the time you were there. Went to ITR and Pickle Meadows before Regimental HQ, 12th Marines in Jan 1954. Lloyd Dellacort 1341399 (2771)

Lloyd Dellacort - June 10, 2020

Marine John Daly, I was in platoon 229 at MCRDSD during the time you were there. Went to ITR and Pickle Meadows before Regimental HQ, 12th Marines in Jan 1954. Lloyd Dellacort 1341399 (2771)

Stan Bussanich - June 10, 2020

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Stan Bussanich
s_bussanich@yahoo.com
76.178.140.35

Boot Camp MCRD 1972. During mail call if there was anything irregular written on the out side of the envelope our Sr. D.I. would call out the privates name and then flip it out the third story barracks window and give us a very short amount of time to run down and get it.

Dave Miller - June 9, 2020

Bootcamp 1967, my Brother was drafted 2 yrs before Mom would let me enlist. She told me years later that she didn’t think I would get in trouble because she sent my Brother Care packages and letters all the time. After about two weeks of BC, Mom sends me a letter loaded with Pogey Bait. Specifically chewing gum sticks taped to 3 pages of letter and the envelope. I was called to center squad bay, my DI suggested I chew the gum myself since Mom didn’t send enough for everyone. So I started taking the letter from the gum, the wrapper from the gum. He said Mom sent the whole thing so there I stood eating an envelope, stamps, 3 pages, 7 sticks of gum with foil and paper AND the Scotch tape was particularly tasty. At this point I had a wad of paper and stuff the size of a softball. I was instructed not to swallow and do not remove the wad until told to. Three days and nights with this wad of stuff. We continued to train as normal then on the third day there was a competition between platoons. Myself and one other recruit could fly up and down the ropes. We were told to cheat, climb the rope get down and get back in the middle of the line. Freeing the fat bodies from making us loose. Gunny caught me and said ‘What in the F*&%ing Jes&*+ CHr%^&name do you have stuck in your mouth recruit? Sir, the recruit MUMBLE, Mumble, choke. Who told you to do that Private? No One Sir, mumble choke. So Gunnysaved me from a fourth day of the mumbles and maybe saved me from choking, Semper Fidelis !

Patrick Vogt - June 9, 2020

When I was in boot camp 1965 my brother sent me a letter. On the return address , in big capital letters, he wrote
LtCol Timothy Vogt. I caught holy hell forever. Oh, you think you are hot stuff. You think you have some pull in the Corps. It
never stopped. My brother said that my father who at that time was a Major did the same thing to him when he was in boot camp.
It did pay off in final inspection. The inspecting officer came in front of me and I came to inspection arms. He asked me my name and
I said Private Vogt, sir. He said do you have a brother Timothy Vogt. I said yes sir. He said tell him hello for me. I forget the Major’s
name. He didn’t ask me any questions and said outstanding as he went to the next Private.
Semper Fi, !stSgt Patrick Vogt, USMC (Retired) Black sheep of the family

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