Skip to content

My Story About Jumping Into Foxholes

The date was Feb 67. I was on my way back after a 30 day free leave for extending 6 months. Flew in to DaNang with a E-7 sitting next to me asking a billion questions. Now at that time transit was in hardbacks near the airfield, no Hilton yet. It is night and I am BSing with a team from 26 Marines. They there for rabies shots. All the sudden we hear a “freight trains” going over our heads. Then loud explosions on other side of airfield. Well this same E-7 runs in yelling about getting into the trenches. So being good Marines we get up go out and proceed to watch the FNG’s jump into a trench 1/2 full of water and mud. We did not say a thing, just walked back to the hootch a went to sleep. Funny, never saw that Gunny again. Semper Fi

Previous article USMC superior training

Comments

Henry Young - April 13, 2020

In reply to Aubrey E Easterlin.
Cpl. Easterlin, I was on that very same Operation(Steel Pike) I was aboard the USS Francis Marion, APA 47. I had the duty of guarding the victims of the helecoptor crash on the way back to Lejuene. I was with H Co. 2/8. RVN 65/66/69. Semper Fi brothers

Will Clifford - April 13, 2020

In reply to Sgt Clark – VN 66-67.
The water table in the Danang area, and especially at Red Beach, was about three feet from the surface, so it is not news that the fighting holes in the area always held water. Now for as the freight train noise; yep, sounds familiar, but the first time that I heard it up close and personal was that I thought a jet from Danang airfield was lost and was skimming our base camp, oh what a surprise.

Douglas Harper - April 13, 2020

After nightly rockets and mortars, we used to sleep through the attacks at Marble Mountain and watch the FNG’s run for the rat-infested, water-filled bunkers. However, the war was serious and I’m glad I made it home. While there I did all I could to train the FNG’s to survive.
Jarhead, USMC 1963 – 1972, Vietnam 1967-1968 SSgt.

Get the word out to Vietnam Vets, there is help at the VA!

Nick - April 13, 2020

You guys have to be SHITIN me this is not a story about frikin FOXHOLES or political correctness! The guy told a story of a memory he had! com’on Jarheads!! Nick 0311/853

Bob Mauney - April 13, 2020

I understand the point and it is valid. However, it is possible that he writer used the term “foxhole” because about every reader would probably relate to “foxhole”, even non-Marines and civilians that read these stories. As a Vietnam Vet I normally use the term “foxhole” when speaking to non-Marine vets and civilians. It seems to eliminate confusion and explaination. Not everyone knows the meanings of “fighting hole” or “fighting trench”….Bob Mauney..Vietnam 1966/1967

Bob Mauney - April 13, 2020

In reply to Norman Wyatt.
I undderstand the point and it is valid. However, it is possible that the writer used the term “foxhole” because about every reader would probably relate to “foxhole”, even non-Marines and civilians that read these stories. As a Vietnam Vet I normally use the term “foxhole” when speaking to non-Marine vets and civilians. It seems to eliminate confusion and exlaination. Not everyone knows the meanings of “fighting hole” or “fighting trench”….Bob Mauney..Vietnam 1966/1967

Cpl Bob Korean Vet - April 13, 2020

You had to be very careful what pits you jumped into in Korea in the 1950’s. Korean farmers used human manure for fertilizer. Unbelievable but true.

gary - April 13, 2020

In reply to Aubrey E Easterlin.
Hi, Aubrey!
Ah, yes, the Med Cruise. Good times! However, 20 amphibious landings is really an exaggeration. If it was about a 6 month cruise, 20 landings would not allow a lot of time for steaming around the Med or hitting all those great liberty ports! Maybe you’re counting more than 1 landing per anchorage.
Semper fidelis!
Gary: 0302

Aubrey E Easterlin - April 13, 2020

For some reason that story reminds me of my tough guy platoon sergeant when I was on a med Cruise. During that 7 months. We made about 20 and amphibious Landings… The first was Operation Steel Pike in 1964 off the coast of Spain. I was a salty squad leader corporal. After circling around in the peterboat for about 15 minutes my bad ass platoon sergeant turn green and puked his guts out. Yes it’s true even a Marine Sergeant can be humbled

Norman Wyatt - April 13, 2020

If they were truly “foxholes” they were probably full of USA troops as during that time the USMC had no “foxholes”!!! None! I believe the writer may have meant “fighting holes”!

Leave a comment

* Required fields