No Rose Garden Coming Home During Vietnam War

No Rose Garden Coming Home During Vietnam War

In your newsletter one person in a comment went to Thailand after the War- my best friend is there too- wound up in Pattaya Beach- ( hope it is spelled correct) – fed up with bullshit here in the states- and a big ex-pat community there- also- one group is in the Philipines too- sorry to say that I can feel for those who found it tough to exist here. I stayed like many others and faced and still face some assholes who still are arm chair quarterbacks as to expounding information – and naturally all wrong it seems. The world is not what it used to be- and now with ISIS and the nut job in North Korea- a President who is a new experience for us- who wants radical changes ( good and bad ) for us. I have no answers– but I would enlist again in a heartbeat if I was younger and faced with the same decision parameters as I was against in 1963- I am proud of Old Glory and the U S of A – and still get riled about the wanna-bees who abuse our Country for silly rhetoric- and thank you Sgt Grit for a place to rave and rant about a chance to voice our opinions- we do not always agree- but enjoy the present- look forward to the future- and remember the past.
Sgt Grit wants to hear from you! Leave your comments below or submit your own story!

15 comments


  • BRENDAN MCCARRON

    WELL SAID. MY RECEPTION WAS NOT AS BAD AS MENTIONED HEAR. IT WAS TRYING TO ENJOY MY LIFE AND I SURE DID FOR 6 MONTHS. THEN HAD TO GO BACK TO THE JOB I HAD BEFORE THAT FAMOUS LETTER FROM THE DRAFT BOARD. I CHOSE THE USMC. BEST DECISION I EVER MADE. MY FRIENDS WELCOMED ME HOME. I DID NOT LET THE A. HOLES. PISS ME OFF. HELL AFTER 21 MONTHS IN DANANG VIETNAM WHO GAVE A SHIT ABOUT ASS HOLES AND DRAFT DODGERS . I WAS MAKING UP FOR LOST TIME AND I SURE DID. SEMPER FI TO ALL YOU GRUNTS. YOU ARE THE BACKBONE OF THE USMC. TO THE WRITER OF THIS LETTER I HOPE EVERY NIGHT YOU PRAY THAT THE ASS HOLES WHO SENT US TO VIETNAM BURN IN HELL WITH NO COMING HOME TO HEAVEN. THATS MY WISH. SURE DO HOPE THE USA WAKES UP TO ALL THE OTHER COUNTRYS WE ARE FIGHTING FOR WHILE THEY MOCK US AND STEAL OUR MONEY WE SEND THEM. SURE HOPE PRESIDENT TRUMP CLEANS HOUSE AND KICKS ASS. GEN MAD DOG MATTIS IS A START IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION. THATS MY OPINION. OPINIONS ARE LIKE ASSHOLES. EVERY ONE HAS ONE BUT MARINES ALL HAVE THE SAME OPINION WHEN IT COMES TO FELLOW MARINES. BRENDAN MCCARRON DANANG VIETNAM 1965 TO 1967. 21 LONG MONTHS OF FUN AND TERROR.


  • Sgt Robert L Sisson

    In reply to .Jerry A. Lewis.
    I could not have said my thoughts any better than what you just did. It wasn’t until I was around 65 that I bought my first Vietnam Vet Hat only because I did not want to get in any arguments.


  • Doc John P.

    Same story here as well. I was in country 1966-67 mostly with my beloved grunts. Then I spent the rest of my time a patient in the now defunct US Naval Hospital, Jamaica, Queens, NY. Things were not so bad while in New York City, I felt, but during many convalescent leaves from hospital I would fly to my home town on standby… which required wearing our uniform in those days. Also, because of on going surgeries, the dress green trousers were the only thing I had those days that would fit over the plaster leg casts. Indeed I was a “walking duck” for any protesters and they were always around. Asked to leave a small bar in JFK airport because a loud female and family came in just after I had ordered my beer. Bar tender took my beer and I left. In my home town I was insulted, denied service in both bars and restaurants and often kids would follow me on the street, just out of reach of a swinging crutch- mimicking my limping gait and spewing the usual verbal abuse. I won’t return to that place although many of my family still live there. I was forced to retire from my medical profession because of the anxiety of PTSD. Lost two wives in divorce, lived between Melbourne and Adelaide Australia until I met my current Mrs. and she is the help mate the sort we all need in our lives. Now we live in a very modest home fairly far from town on Puget Sound in NW Washington… and often the sounds of absolute peace and silence are deafening. I reckon I will die here too- for lack of a better AO. At least no one gets in my face any more.


  • .Jerry A. Lewis

    Viet Nam was a special war, special people died their, and special people came home from their. At that time and place, we had a job to do. To us it was no different than Iwo – Okinawa – Germany – Japan, or any other war fought by this great Nation of ours. While I was their, I never felt that we were wrong in being their. I saw good and bad, lots of both. But. at eighteen, nineteen, and twenty, My Country said I needed to be their. I believed in my country then, and I believe in it today. All I have to do is look around and count my blessing’s, along with the rest of the folks that make up this Great Nation. Perfect, not by a long shot, but by far better than any other part of the world that I have seen. These words really aren’t meant for most non Military folks, I am simply reinforcing the feelings of the ones that were their. Most of us were all in the same boat, proud to have served our Country. Came home proud. But, were Stunned by the reception upon our return. A whole year of our life just seemed to vanish. No discussion’s with almost anyone about THE EXPERIENCE you just went through. Hide it, keep it inside. Not really knowing what it all meant. Some of our unfortunate brothers couldn’t hide from their past, they brought the signs of war with them. We just wanted to fit in, and that was tough for any young man that had been through what we had been through. However, there seems to be a brighter side to some of this, and I believe that it may have come as a surprise to those of us veterans that are, let me be fair here, still looking for a little acknowledgement, proud to have served, [Marine Corps or otherwise] or maybe just flat out enjoy wearing your Marine Corps Hat. Or it might even say, Viet Nam Vet on it. You have in some way let people know that you served your country. And unless you are lucky enough to look like a kid, your age will tell them what era you served in. My point is this. My father served and fought in New Gina. And he did get the acknowledgement for serving when he came home. However he passed at the age of 86 and no one mentioned his service to him for the next 60 years. Now, here is where I am going with this. I am now fast approaching 71. I wear my Marine Corps hat quite often. Started at about 65. I can’t count on my fingers and toe’s how many young, old, and in between Marines I have met because of it. Also I have been thanked for my service many many times. And no, it’s not something I am looking for, but it is nice to hear something you missed years ago, when you are a little closer to checking out. Semper Fi Marines, and thank you for your service! Rest in peace to our fallen brothers. You will not be forgotten!


  • tom coughlin

    I am so thankful that I went to boot camp in 1963.It is what I needed.I think I was able to make it because I was to afraid or to dumb to know what was good for me.The drill Sgt”s help make me who i am today.I do not think I would like today boot camp.


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