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When Times are Trying , Just a Little Humor

Grunt.com Admin |

Around the winter, spring of “68” the TET offensive was in full swing. I was a ammo tech H&S Co 3/7 around a little village called Dia Lac at the four corners. When most Marines called it a day they would leave their radios on after Armed Forces Radio went off the air. That way it would come back on in the morning without having to turn it back on and you know it was around 0600 hr. This particular morning around o545 hrs we started catching incoming and, of course, there was a scramble to get your stuff to a hole or bunker. The mortar rounds were right on top of us so the closest spot was right under the hooch It wasn’t a small bunker but it got crowded real quick. So, I always tried to get to the ammo dump because the bunkers are built so much better. After about 5 min. of this It stopped I decided to make a run for the dump. Well, about that time “old Charlie ” seem to know when I stuck my head out he put one almost on top of us. I fell back in the bunker and you know how quiet it gets. You could’ve heard a pin drop for about 30 seconds. Then all of a sudden you hear “GOOOOOOOOOOOD MORNING VIET NAM!” coming from the radio when it came back on. Well, there’s probably at least 3 to 500 Marines on this hill (Hill 37) at any given time and most have their radios on. After about 15 seconds you hear someone start to laugh, then someone else starts, pretty soon the whole hill is cracking up. You remember a lot of bad scenes over there but once in awhile there’s a little humor. Sid Crews Cpl. 2311 P.I.Platoon 264, platoon guide. Enlisted Aug. 65 to June 69 Nam Nov. 66 to July 68

16 comments

I think I heard that story somewhere before!! LOL Harry

Harry,

In reply to Harry.
I hope this the same Harry that wrote before telling me they approved the Compensation for bladder cancer. They wrote me (after you told me about it I contacted them) and my rep got in touch with me. They said I will be approved that I have to go to a meeting in 2 months to determine the amount. It will be back dated to 2009 Thanks again Harry. Semper Fi

Sgt Robert L Sisson,

In reply to Sgt Robert L Sisson.
Glad I could help! Harry

Harry,

This was posted the first time about 6 months ago. I think Sgt. Grit is checking to see if were paying attention or maybe they like my story. LOL. Semper Fi my friends.

sidney crews,

In reply to Harry.
I was really pissed that it had to come from you and not my REP. I can not tell you how much I appreciate this Harry. I had been dealing with them since 2009 and then when cancer came back in 2014. I would have thought they would have contacted me. I told her this and she said they are over loaded with cases. They should have there computers set up to notify people how many more guys out there have no idea. To begin with it was a guy at work who first told me about it in 2009 when I came back to work after being off a few months(4 months) about the water..He was also a MARINE stationed at Lejeune.

Sgt. Robert L Sisson,

In reply to Harry.
I was really pissed that it had to come from you and not my REP. I can not tell you how much I appreciate this Harry. I had been dealing with them since 2009 and then when cancer came back in 2014. I would have thought they would have contacted me. I told her this and she said they are over loaded with cases. They should have there computers set up to notify people how many more guys out there have no idea. To begin with it was a guy at work who first told me about it in 2009 when I came back to work after being off a few months(4 months) about the water..He was also a MARINE stationed at Lejeune.

Sgt. Robert L Sisson,

Great story Sidney!! Loved it.

Raul Miranda,

In reply to sidney crews.
It is a good story,worth repeating. Semper Fi Sidney! Harry.

Harry,

In reply to Sgt. Robert L Sisson.
You are right on Sgt. I have assisted a few that were never notified.The latest is a Marine stationed there in 1963. He is now 75 years old and, had his first tumor removed when he was 63.On the subject of amount,If your cancer is still active you should receive 100%. Back payments have not been approved yet.Your payment will start on the day the presumptive was authorized as long as you already had a claim in.Any other payments will come later after they are authorized,Keep on top of it sometimes they go back to the initial diagnosis. Harry

Harry,

Great story Sidney!! Loved it.

Raul Miranda,

In reply to sidney crews.
It is a good story,worth repeating. Semper Fi Sidney! Harry.

Harry,

In reply to Sgt. Robert L Sisson.
You are right on Sgt. I have assisted a few that were never notified.The latest is a Marine stationed there in 1963. He is now 75 years old and, had his first tumor removed when he was 63.On the subject of amount,If your cancer is still active you should receive 100%. Back payments have not been approved yet.Your payment will start on the day the presumptive was authorized as long as you already had a claim in.Any other payments will come later after they are authorized,Keep on top of it sometimes they go back to the initial diagnosis. Harry

Harry,

Hi Sidney, Jimmy here. I was a Kilo Marine also. There from Dec ’67 to Jan ’69. Wasn’t at hill 37 when this happened. Was on hill 55. Any how good story, Semper Fi brother.

Jimmy Clay,

In reply to Sgt. Robert L Sisson.
Right now I have no problem. I had 3 tumors removed in 09 then again in 14 other tumors They were just starting to form,in 14, these were not cut out like the first time in 09 when I had 3 tumors .All I needed was 5 chemo treatments . This must have worked because I go in the hospital for a cysto exam every 6 months and no sign of cancer. It is now every year. I will know again in June. I first put in a claim as agent orange in 09 then my friend told me about the water also in 09. That is when i put the first claim for the water. Around 10 or 11 they said they would pay my doctor bills. I told them I wanted compensated I already had complete medical coverage. So this is where we stand. I still think it is agent orange. I know a few guys that were over there in the Army that have gone through what I have with the Bladder cancer. Thanks a lot for all the information Harry. My doctor told us this is the type of cancer that keeps coming back you never know when so you have to go in the hospital for the exams to catch it before it spreads.

Sgt. Robert L Sisson,

My brother is suffering and I long for him to come home from Vietnam. I don’t know anyone who fought with him, but I can tell you he was a Magnificent Bastard 2/4th Hotel Company! He was seriously wounded and was exposed to agent orange. He was the Oustanding Marine of his platoon at Camp Lejune, but we did not get to see him graduate, nor did we understand the honor of what that meant. Sadly my dad had already died, the age of 33, from bronchitis. Mom raised all eight of us alone and was too broke to go anywhere other than church. She still does not realize how bad Vietnam was, much less the Tet Offensive, PTSD, AGENT ORANGE, or anything about the bad water at Pariris Island. I have had to save my brother from his suffering 3 times in the last 24 months! I love him very much, but only now am I beginning to see him and how deep his wounds are. He took shrapnel in his left leg while crossing a river and nearly drowned. He doesn’t talk about anything of Vietnam, which kills me because I long for him to heal at least a little bit. Lately his left arm is excruciatingly painful and it’s really hard for him to walk. I would like to find someone who might have been there with him, someone who can relate to him because they themselves were there. I am begging you fellow Marines to not leave him back there in Daido, drowning in the river. I fear he may die soon from the toxins ravaging his body. I myself am para military, only a retired police officer, the little sister of a tattered, lonely, lost Marine who cannot find his way home. His wife is on duty every night praying for him and warding off his hypnagogic nightmares. He is now her Vietnam PTSD, but she has loved him for 48yrs now and has nightmares of her own, as do their four daughters who do not understand why she doesn’t just leave him. They are in their marital Vietnam and do not know how to get out, they are doing all they can do to not die. My brother Alfred believes in God but he needs a brother to remind him that he is home now and that it’s okay to cry and say goodbye to Vietnam. I was so sheltered that I fear it might be to late for me to help him, so I’m looking to you and pleading for someone to help me help my brother. I “see” him, I just don’t know how to reach him! To all of you I say, Welcome home! You are worthy to be loved and I thank you from the depths of my heart for your service. All of you make me feel safe here in America the beautiful! God bless you all. Respectfully submitted – Susan

Susan Romero,

Hi Susan, I would feel re-missed If I did not reply. There are a lot of people,probably near where you live, that could help.The VA hospital has a PTSD clinic and, most VA clinics have a social worker and psychologist on staff.If you are looking for another Vietnam vet to help,the Vietnam vets of America could help or If you want another Marine to talk to him call the local Marine Corps League. Most Veterans Organizations have a service foundation that you can call. My personal preference is the DAV.He deserves to live find him help! You can not do it on your own! God Bless Harry

Harry,

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