I was there also

By: John Skoufis

Same time I was there as a Marine Corps Scout. I served proudly for my country as a first generation citizen. Not only did I have pride in America and the Corps but so did my family. My father had often said there is no greater sacrifice of love you can make for your country that to defend it when called. The trip home was a blessing but getting back to my old job as a research chemist was met with many insults with statements of sending me back for having served. Times now have changed and I never regretted not being one of those that ran to Canada as they accepted all the sacrifices others made before them that provided the safety and freedom they more than willingly accepted. What I, and we, went through made us not only better civilians but better understood what it took to make the America MOST of us love.

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8 comments


  • Reinhold Woykowski

    I was born in Germany in 1953. My father told me it is my duty to go into the service so in 1972 I joined the Marines. Best move I did.


  • RANDOL PARR

    Please tell us how you really feel. I am a Scottish American and a Sgt in Marines and served in RVN 66-68


  • BRENDAN MC CARRON

    LIKE YOU I ALSO ENJOYED THE BENIFITS OF LIVING IN THE USA AS A IMAGRINT. I JOINED THE MARINES DURING VIETNAM AFTER I GOT MY DRAFT NOTICE. I KNEW I OWED IT TO MY ADOPTED COUNTRY WHICH PROVIDED MY PARENTS AND BROTHERS AND SISTERS JOBS AND A FUTURE WE WERE NOT ABLE TO GET IN OUR NATIVE LAND.
    OUR NATIVE LAND WAS IRELAND RULED BY THE HATED ENGLISH.
    SEMPER FI. MARINES AND GOD DAMN THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND TO HELL. SLAINTE.


  • Cordeiro Gary

    My first combat issue had a canteen cup with the outline of Korea etched on it. Wish I still had it.


  • thomas frawley

    My father was in the marines and was at Iwo,didn’t like to talk about .My uncle was also a Marine during the Korean war,my cousin was in the Marine air wing and I was Motor T at Camp Lejune. Semper Fi.


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